Movies with a strong Christian component

berserker2001

Robin
Orthodox
Nothing about “The Witch” struck me as glamorizing witchcraft. Quite the opposite of most recent films/series in the genre. It was disturbing to say the least.
I will fully admit that I don't watch too many movies anymore, and am not overly adept at interpreting their deeper meanings that often, but throughout the movie a family is being used for rituals and spells by a band of shadowy witches hiding in the woods. The family tries to protect themselves with wholesome means, but the forces of evil win at every turn. The forces of evil out-pivot the forces of good. Eventually, the ultimate evil is the daughter essentially betraying her loved ones, in favor of joining the witch cult in the woods which is promoted as the more powerful force, capable of magic and control. This is the most intense sales job you could possibly pitch to attract young women to the dark powers of witch craft. Even the satanists came out and gave it their full stamp of approval, largely for it's "anti-Christian, anti-patriarchal" message which they support.
Why satanists have given new horror movie The Witch their endorsement
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
I will fully admit that I don't watch too many movies anymore, and am not overly adept at interpreting their deeper meanings that often, but throughout the movie a family is being used for rituals and spells by a band of shadowy witches hiding in the woods. The family tries to protect themselves with wholesome means, but the forces of evil win at every turn. The forces of evil out-pivot the forces of good. Eventually, the ultimate evil is the daughter essentially betraying her loved ones, in favor of joining the witch cult in the woods which is promoted as the more powerful force, capable of magic and control. This is the most intense sales job you could possibly pitch to attract young women to the dark powers of witch craft. Even the satanists came out and gave it their full stamp of approval, largely for it's "anti-Christian, anti-patriarchal" message which they support.
Why satanists have given new horror movie The Witch their endorsement
I agree with this interpretation which is why the movie did not click with me on a deeper level. The power of prayer and faith in God was powerless against the witches magic in this movie which is a deception unto itself. Compare this to The Rite where the priest accepts Christ and is then able to cast out the demon.
 

An0dyne

Robin
I think the point was quite the opposite. The nuance of Puritan theology is in play here too; there’s actually a lot of attention to detail in this regard throughout the film (e.g., quoting the Reformed catechism in use at that time). The devil exploits the spiritual weakness (pet sins) of each member of the family and undoes them accordingly.

From the beginning, the pride of the father (his ultimate downfall in the end) resulted in his excommunication from the church (self-imposed or otherwise; I can’t remember the specifics as it’s been a while since I watched it). This resulted in the baby being outside the covenant grace of baptism. The sin of the father was his undoing, as he was killed by the witch outside of grace.

The father’s spiritual arrogance separated his family from the church and blinded him to the grave spiritual problems festering in each member. If I recall correctly, the mother was lacking in charity and used the catechism as a club rather than as a source of spiritual aid. The twins’ breaking the commandment against false witness was their undoing. The older boy was undone by lust. And the father in the end fell to despair when he concluded he was not “elect.” His entire worldview was shaped by the perspective that God would preserve his family if they were “elect.” But he neglected to take proper spiritual headship and yet was still prideful of his own theological integrity. Pride went before the fall.

As I said it’s been a while since I watched it so I may be misremembering a few things. But the painstaking attention to detail the creator took struck a chord with me (even the set and musical score were designed using historical materials from that era and using obscure period instrumentation). I can see why it wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea if you’re not into the nuances of 18th century Puritanism lol.
 

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Elder Joseph the Hesychast

Last year there was an excellent documentary in english about St. Joseph the Hesychast of Mount Athos, starring Christian American actor Jonathan Jackson. It's titled Elder Joseph because he was canonized a few months after its release.


The film depicts the life of an ascetic monk of Mt. Athos who recently has been canonised a Saint by the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The title of the film bears his monastic name: Elder Joseph the Hesychast.

Scenes from his early childhood on the island of Paros, his transition and efforts in Athens, lead on to his monastic life on Mt. Athos. Having been offered the invitation by God for an ascetic life, he was tonsured a monk in 1921. He was granted many experiences of the divine but simultaneously great demonic temptations. He lived with prayer, fasting and vigil, and was granted the Grace of the Holy Spirit, while obtaining the spiritual gifts of foresight and prophesy. Elder Joseph very soon took on students, one of whom has also been canonised a saint: Elder Efraim of Katounakia. Another three of his spiritual students became Abbots of the monasteries of Mt. Athos, just as he himself had prophesied. His spiritual children built up monastic centres in Greece, Cyprus, USA, Canada and all over the world. Elder Joseph is recognised as one of the greatest contemporary ascetic personalities of Mt. Athos, and the Church at large.

The unique film uncovers his ascetic struggles in the most deserted parts of Mt. Athos. The film is unique in that the entire life of the ascetic monk is dramatised with great precision and detail by the 5 time EMMY award winning Jonathan Jackson. It is the first time the camera lens has captured the hidden ascetic life of the monks of Mt. Athos. Elder Joseph met with experienced elders, some of whom have recently been canonised as Saints.

Also on Vimeo
 

berserker2001

Robin
Orthodox
I think the point was quite the opposite. The nuance of Puritan theology is in play here too; there’s actually a lot of attention to detail in this regard throughout the film (e.g., quoting the Reformed catechism in use at that time). The devil exploits the spiritual weakness (pet sins) of each member of the family and undoes them accordingly.

From the beginning, the pride of the father (his ultimate downfall in the end) resulted in his excommunication from the church (self-imposed or otherwise; I can’t remember the specifics as it’s been a while since I watched it). This resulted in the baby being outside the covenant grace of baptism. The sin of the father was his undoing, as he was killed by the witch outside of grace.

The father’s spiritual arrogance separated his family from the church and blinded him to the grave spiritual problems festering in each member. If I recall correctly, the mother was lacking in charity and used the catechism as a club rather than as a source of spiritual aid. The twins’ breaking the commandment against false witness was their undoing. The older boy was undone by lust. And the father in the end fell to despair when he concluded he was not “elect.” His entire worldview was shaped by the perspective that God would preserve his family if they were “elect.” But he neglected to take proper spiritual headship and yet was still prideful of his own theological integrity. Pride went before the fall.

As I said it’s been a while since I watched it so I may be misremembering a few things. But the painstaking attention to detail the creator took struck a chord with me (even the set and musical score were designed using historical materials from that era and using obscure period instrumentation). I can see why it wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea if you’re not into the nuances of 18th century Puritanism lol.
I appreciate your perspective from a very deep Christian historical standpoint on the nature of schisms and pride, so I think you are correct at least in that sense of an accurate interpretation from a mature mindset.... I am only purely speaking to how the movie would play in the mind of, say, an 18 year old impressionable Gen-Z girl who will take the movie's message at more of a superficial level. I am sensitive to such Hollywood programming because I have 3 nieces in their teenage years, who I am trying to subtly influence with Christian morality and deeper meaning, and they are into horror movies and to some extent that Billie Eilish pop-gothic aesthetic which is a short leap from witch-craft culture. I wish I could think of the other modern horror witch propaganda movies I've watched with them, I think there was 2 others, I'll try to remember and post later. But I am highly suspicious of this witch/ gothic propaganda towards teen girls.
 

An0dyne

Robin
I appreciate your perspective from a very deep Christian historical standpoint on the nature of schisms and pride, so I think you are correct at least in that sense of an accurate interpretation from a mature mindset.... I am only purely speaking to how the movie would play in the mind of, say, an 18 year old impressionable Gen-Z girl who will take the movie's message at more of a superficial level. I am sensitive to such Hollywood programming because I have 3 nieces in their teenage years, who I am trying to subtly influence with Christian morality and deeper meaning, and they are into horror movies and to some extent that Billie Eilish pop-gothic aesthetic which is a short leap from witch-craft culture. I wish I could think of the other modern horror witch propaganda movies I've watched with them, I think there was 2 others, I'll try to remember and post later. But I am highly suspicious of this witch/ gothic propaganda towards teen girls.
To be honest, I think they would find the movie incredibly boring. When I saw it in theaters, people literally walked out halfway through complaining how dull it was. I saw it with my younger sibling/cousin (in your concerned age ranges at the time) and they were incredibly bored by it as well. I think it takes a mature viewer to find it “enjoyable,” if that makes sense. But that’s just based on the reactions I experienced to it.
 

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
"Paul, Apostle of Christ" is one of the better movies I've seen in years, especially the last half.
This film from 2018 is truly a great Christian movie and stars Jim Caviezel as the Evangelist Luke, who visits St. Paul in a Roman prison in order to record some of the events of his life after Paul was sentenced by Nero.
 

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Here's a summary of most of the Christian films in this thread. For the older movies, I've pasted Leonard Maltin's reviews because I've found over many years that nearly anything he rates 3 stars out of 4 or higher is worth watching. For the newer ones, I've pasted the Wiki synopses. They're in alphabetical order.

The Agony and the Ecstacy (1965)
140 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 2.5 stars out of 4:
Huge spectacle of Michelangelo's artistic conflicts with Pope Julius II has adequate acting overshadowed by meticulous production. Short documentary on artist's work precedes fragmentary drama based on bits of Irving Stone's novel. Starring Charlton Heston.

Amazing Grace (2007)
The true story of evangelical politician William Wilberforce, who fought to end slavery in the British Empire.

The Apostle (1997)
Starring, directed and written by Robert Duvall, who plays a preacher from Texas. After his happy life spins out of control, he changes his name, goes to Louisiana and starts preaching on the radio.

Barabbas (1962)
134 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 3 stars out of 4:
Lavish production, coupled with good script (based on Lagerkvist's novel) and generally fine acting by large cast make for engrossing, literate experience. Overly long. Starring Anthony Quinn.

The Bells of St. Mary's (1945)
126 min, no rating, black & white
Leonard Maltin review 3 stars out of 4:
Amiable if meandering sequel to Going My Way, with Father O'Malley assigned to a run-down parish where Bergman is the Sister Superior. Bing Cosby introduces the song "Aren't You Glad You're You?" Also shown in computer-colored version.

Ben Hur (1959)
212 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 3.5 stars out of 4:
Epic-scale rendering of Gen. Lew Wallace's "Tale of the Christ." Charlton Heston and Stephen Boyd are well matched as the proud Jew Ben-Hur and his boyhood friend Messala, whose blind allegiance to Rome turns him into a bitter enemy. Poky at times, but redeemed by the strength of its convictions. Some of the special effects show their age, though the galley-slave sequence, and climactic chariot race (directed by Andrew Marton and staged by the legendary stunt expert Yakima Canutt) are still great. Some TV prints expand to widescreen format for the 15-minute chariot race sequence only. Filmed in MGM Camera 65.

The Case for Christ (2017)
A 2017 American Christian drama film directed by Jon Gunn and written by Brian Bird, based on a true story that was inspired by the 1998 book of the same name by Lee Strobel. The film stars Mike Vogel, Erika Christensen, Faye Dunaway and Robert Forster, and follows an atheist journalist who looks to disprove his wife's Christian faith.

The Catholics (1973)
Leonard Maltin review (TV) Above Average [Maltin's ratings for TV are below, average, or above]:
78 min, no rating, color
Powerful futuristic religious drama pitting strong-willed abbot Trevor Howard against emissary-of-change Martin Sheen, sent by the Vatican to his secluded monastery. Wordy but thought-provoking; adapted by Brian Moore from his novel. Video title: The Conflict.

Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954)
101 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 2.5 stars out of 4:
Hokey sequel to The Robe has Emperor Caligula (Jay Robinson) searching for magic robe of Christ; Victor Mature dallies with royal Susan Hayward. CinemaScope.

Diary of a Country Priest (1950)
France, 120 min, no rating, black & white
Leonard Maltin review 3.5 stars out of 4:
The life and death of an unhappy young priest attempting to minister to his first parish in rural France. Slow-moving but rewarding, with brilliantly stylized direction. Robert Bresson also scripted.

Elder Joseph the Hesychast (2020)
The film depicts the life of an ascetic monk of Mt. Athos who recently has been canonised a Saint by the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The title of the film bears his monastic name: Elder Joseph the Hesychas

The Flowers of Saint Francis (1950)
Italy, 89 minutes, no rating, black & white
A series of vignettes depicting the lives of the original Franciscan monks, including their leader and the bumbling Ginepro. Directed by Roberto Rossellini and co-written by Federico Fellini.

Going My Way (1944)
126 min, no rating, black & white
Leonard Maltin review 4 stars out of 4:
Sentimental story of down-to-earth priest Father O'Malley (Bing Crosby) winning over aging superior (Barry Fitzgerald) and sidewalk gang of kids is hard to resist—thanks to the skills of writer-director McCarey, who won two Oscars. Academy Awards also went to Crosby, Fitzgerald, Best Picture, and Best Song: "Swinging on a Star." Sequel: The Bells of St. Mary'S.

The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1966)
France-Italy, 135 min, no rating, black & white
Leonard Maltin review 4 stars out of 4:
Unconventional, austere film on life and teachings of Christ, based solely on writings of the Apostle, Matthew. Amateur cast (including director's mother) is expressive and moves with quiet dignity. Ironically, director of this masterpiece was a Marxist.

Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958)
158 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 3 stars out of 4:
True story of English servant (Ingrid Bergman) who, despite her lack of credentials, realizes her dream of becoming a missionary in China.

The Island (2006) (Russian: Остров, romanized: Ostrov)
A 2006 Russian film about a fictional 20th century Eastern Orthodox monk in an obscure monastery, who is considered to be a holy man able to pray for immediate cures and give sage advice. Probably the best film depicting healing through prayer, as well as Christian clairvoyance and premonition/discernment.

Jesus of Nazareth (1977)
TV mini-series, 6+ hours
A 1977 British-Italian epic film and television drama serial directed by Franco Zeffirelli and co-written by Zeffirelli, Anthony Burgess, and Suso Cecchi d'Amico which dramatizes the birth, life, ministry, crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus. It stars Robert Powell as Jesus, and features an all-star cast of actors, including eight who had won or would go on to win Academy Awards: Anne Bancroft, Ernest Borgnine, Laurence Olivier, Christopher Plummer, Anthony Quinn, Rod Steiger, James Earl Jones, and Peter Ustinov.

King of Kings (1961)
168 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 3.5 stars out of 4:
The life of Christ, intelligently told and beautifully filmed; full of deeply moving moments, such as the Sermon on the Mount, Christ's healing of the lame, and many others. Memorable Miklos Rozsa score. Not without flaws, but well worthwhile; grandly filmed in widescreen Super Technirama 70. Narrated by Orson Welles, Roberty Ryan as John the Baptist, and Rip Torn as Judas Escariot.

Lilies of the Field (1963)
93 min, no rating, black & white
Leonard Maltin review 3 stars out of 4:
A "little" film that made good, winning Sidney Poitier an Oscar as handyman who helps build a chapel for the Abbess (Lilia Skala) and her German-speaking nuns. Quiet, well acted, enjoyable. Director Nelson followed this with a TV movie, Christmas Lilies of the Field.

A Man for All Seasons (1966)
UK, 120 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 4 stars out of 4:
Splendid film based on Robert Bolt's play about Sir Thomas More's personal conflict when King Henry VIII asks his support in break with Pope and formation of Church of England. Scofield's rich characterization matched by superb cast, vivid atmosphere. Six Oscars include Best Actor, Director, Picture, Screenplay (Robert Bolt), Cinematography (Ted Moore), Costumes. Remade for TV in 1988.

The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima (1952)
102 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 3 stars out of 4:
Thoughtful account of religious miracle witnessed by farm children in 1910s; intelligent script. Retitled: Miracle of Fatima.

My Night at Maud's (1969)
France, 105 min, Rated PG, black & white
No. 3 of Eric Rohmer's "Six Moral Tales" is most intellectual, with Jean-Louis Trintignant as moral Catholic man infatuated with woman completely unlike himself. Talky, fascinating, more specialized in appeal than later entries in series. Marrie Christine Barrault's first film.

Ordet (1955)
Denmark, 125 min, no rating, black & white
Leonard Maltin review 4 stars out of 4:
Two rural families, at odds with each other over religious differences, are forced to come to grips with their children's love for each other. Arguably Director Carl Theodor Dreyer's greatest film, but certainly the movies' final word on the struggle between conventional Christianity and more personalized religious faith. Truly awe-inspiring, with a never-to-be-forgotten climactic scene. Based on a play by Kaj Munk, which was filmed before in 1943.

Paul, Apostle of Christ (2018)
106 minutes, color, starring Jim Caviezel. I give this 4 out of 4 stars.
Caviezel plays Luke the Evangelist, who has come to Rome in order to speak with St. Paul, who has been imprisoned by Nero. Great script, great acting, great film on a small budget.

Quo Vadis? (1951)
171 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 3 stars out of 4:
Gargantuan MGM adaptation of Henryk Sienkiewicz' novel set during the reign of Nero; Roman soldier Taylor has to figure out how to romance Christian Kerr without both of them ending up as lunch for the lions. Meticulous production includes fine location shooting and Miklos Rozsa score based on music of the era. Remade for Italian TV.

Risen (2016)
A 2016 American biblical drama film directed by Kevin Reynolds and written by Reynolds and Paul Aiello. The film stars Joseph Fiennes, Tom Felton, Peter Firth, and Cliff Curtis, and details a Roman soldier's search for Yeshua's body following his resurrection. Columbia Pictures released the film to theaters in the United States on February 19, 2016. It received mixed reviews and grossed $46 million worldwide.

The Robe (1953)
135 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 2.5 stars out of 4:
Earnest but episodic costume drama from Lloyd C. Douglas novel about Roman centurion who presides over Christ's crucifixion. Burton's Oscar-nominated performance seems stiff and superficial today, while Mature (as his slave Demetrius) comes off quite well! Famed as first movie in CinemaScope, though it was simultaneously shot "flat." Sequel: Demetrius and the Gladiators.

The Ten Commandments (1956)
220 min, no rating, color
Leonard Maltin review 4 stars out of 4:
Vivid storytelling at its best. Biblical epic follows Moses' life from birth and abandonment through manhood, slavery, and trials in leading the Jews out of Egypt. Few subtleties in De Mille's second handling of this tale (first filmed in 1923) but few lulls, either. Parting of the Red Sea (De Mille's second!), writing of the holy tablets are unforgettable highlights. Oscar-winning special effects. VistaVision.

The Way (2010)
123 minutes, color, written and directed by Emilio Estevez, starring his father Martin Sheen. I give it 2.5/4 stars and agree with Kirk Honeycutt of The Hollywood Reporter, who wrote a mixed review, stating: "Emilio Estevez's The Way is an earnest film, its heart always in the right place, but it's severely under dramatized." Difficult to avoid spoilers here. Sheen's character walks part of the real Christian pilgrimage route Camino de Santiago, and encounters fellow travelers from France to Spain. The setting of the film is Christian even if the pilgrims who make up the cast are not the most devout, but are more like a typical collection of oddballs in a road-trip movie.
 
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Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Forgot one film because it's a given, but of course Passion of the Christ (2004) has to be at the top of the list IMHO, although some Christians think it overemphasizes the violence.

For those who consider The Godfather or other films with themes tangential to Jesus' teaching to be Christian movies, I'd like to offer a bit of trivia about the Holy Sacrament of Baptism portrayed in The Godfather (with Coppola's daughter as the infant) that I think is relevant and an example of why such films are not Christian.

The words for baptism used in the movie (around the 2:37 mark) do not match the normal ceremony. In the normal ceremony, it says in Latin that, “God will come to judge the living and the dead, and the world by fire," but in the movie it says that Michael will do this. Coppola is a genius film maker and this could be a tiny detail of his creative flourish referring to Michael's revenge at the end of the movie, but I'm certain from his films, DVD interviews, etc., that Coppola's into mystery religions, even though I don't think he's ever publicly said so, and I think his use of Christianity in his movies is thematic and plot driven—not authentic—but symbolic of the characters and of his own beliefs.

Another trivial example, one that I may be over-interpreting I'll grant, is in Coppola's masterpiece The Conversation (1974). In the last sequence, when Harry Caul is looking for a bug, he's tearing up everything in sight but initially skips over a statuette of Mother Mary, only to finally come back to it in order to look for a listening device. He tries to break it, but it cannot be broken because it's plastic, so he literally unrolls/unravels it (((like a scroll))) and finds absolutely nothing inside.

I think the symbolism with the Mother Mary statuette is obvious and I also do not think a devout Christian would include it, but Coppola did include it, not in order to be disrespectful or blasphemous, but because it was revelatory of himself and his view of Catholicism/Christianity. Therefore, no Coppola film is Christian, and neither are many other flicks with some Christian meaning or references, because they're made by people who disbelieve. While God can turn a film or other work by a non-believer into something with a Christian meaning and purpose, I think that is a rare exception in the film industry.
 
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MrFreezy

Sparrow
Danish movie Land of Mine from 2015:


Technically a war movie. Or maybe post war. About how the Danish treated the leftover German soldiers, in this case teenagers, after the war. Forcing them to clean of the beach from land mines by freaking hands.

Strong movie! One of very few European movies on WW2 that I respect. 99% garbage.

Christian subject here: How to forgive your enemy!
 
I think the point was quite the opposite. The nuance of Puritan theology is in play here too; there’s actually a lot of attention to detail in this regard throughout the film (e.g., quoting the Reformed catechism in use at that time). The devil exploits the spiritual weakness (pet sins) of each member of the family and undoes them accordingly.

From the beginning, the pride of the father (his ultimate downfall in the end) resulted in his excommunication from the church (self-imposed or otherwise; I can’t remember the specifics as it’s been a while since I watched it). This resulted in the baby being outside the covenant grace of baptism. The sin of the father was his undoing, as he was killed by the witch outside of grace.

The father’s spiritual arrogance separated his family from the church and blinded him to the grave spiritual problems festering in each member. If I recall correctly, the mother was lacking in charity and used the catechism as a club rather than as a source of spiritual aid. The twins’ breaking the commandment against false witness was their undoing. The older boy was undone by lust. And the father in the end fell to despair when he concluded he was not “elect.” His entire worldview was shaped by the perspective that God would preserve his family if they were “elect.” But he neglected to take proper spiritual headship and yet was still prideful of his own theological integrity. Pride went before the fall.

As I said it’s been a while since I watched it so I may be misremembering a few things. But the painstaking attention to detail the creator took struck a chord with me (even the set and musical score were designed using historical materials from that era and using obscure period instrumentation). I can see why it wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea if you’re not into the nuances of 18th century Puritanism lol.
That's why Molinism I believe fits the Scriptural Data. For how can God desire all to repent and be saved yet somehow make it entirely involuntary as if they are Robots playing out their roles.

Makes God out to be Schizophrenic. A good article on this key passage used by Calvinists:
 
Here's a summary of most of the Christian films in this thread. For the older movies, I've pasted Leonard Maltin's reviews because I've found over many years that nearly anything he rates 3 stars out of 4 or higher is worth watching. For the newer ones, I've pasted the Wiki synopses. They're in alphabetical order.

The Agony and the Ecstacy (1965)
Amazing Grace (2007)
The Apostle (1997)
Barabbas (1962)
The Bells of St. Mary's (1945)
Ben Hur (1959)
The Case for Christ (2017)
The Catholics (1973)
Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954)
Diary of a Country Priest (1950)
Elder Joseph the Hesychast (2020)
The Flowers of Saint Francis (1950)
Going My Way (1944)
The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1966)
Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958)
The Island (2006)
(Russian: Остров, romanized: Ostrov)
Jesus of Nazareth (1977)
King of Kings (1961)
Lilies of the Field (1963)
A Man for All Seasons (1966)
The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima (1952)
My Night at Maud's (1969)
Ordet (1955)
Paul, Apostle of Christ (2018)
Quo Vadis? (1951)
Risen (2016)
The Robe (1953)
The Ten Commandments (1956)
The Way (2010)
Great list, but missing one of the best ones and one of my personal favorites:

The Bible... In The Beginning (1966)

Such a fantastic film, I am surprised so much made it into the film itself and how accurate it is to the scriptures. It captures all the beauty and good, as well as the evil and the things we should be wary of. No other movie shows the subtle details such as the devil's form before he was a crawling serpent (you see him fall out of the tree before becoming a snake) , the bones on the canaanite womans dress who mocks Noah reminiscent of all anti-God pagan cultures, and the homosexual and crossdressing deviants of Sodom with their excessive makeup who resemble modern day gays too closely. There is even a scene where Abraham walks with Isaac in the ruins of Sodom and explains their fate, chilling but true. His best line in the movie "we must obey Him in all things" as he is given the ultimate test of faith.
 

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Great list, but missing one of the best ones and one of my personal favorites:

The Bible... In The Beginning (1966)

Such a fantastic film, I am surprised so much made it into the film itself and how accurate it is to the scriptures...
I haven't seen it, but it has a great cast and looks interesting. Here's what a couple of critics said about it. Maltin rarely gives a one star review.

Pauline Kael Review
John Huston's agnostic version of the stories of Genesis. There are times when God seems to be smiling, such as during the dispersal of the animals after the landing of the Ark, and other times when God demands cruel proofs of obedience, such as in the story of Abraham (George C. Scott). A sprawling, flawed epic, but with some breathtaking conceptions and moments of beauty. With Michael Parks, Ulla Bergryd, Richard Harris, Ava Gardner, Stephen Boyd, and Peter O'Toole; cinematography by Giuseppe Rotunno. A Dino De Laurentiis Production; released by 20th Century-Fox. For a more extended discussion, see Pauline Kael's book Kiss Kiss Bang Bang.

Leonard Maltin Review: 1.0 stars out of 4
Unsuccessful epic dealing with Adam and Eve, Cain and Abel, Noah and the Flood, etc. (first 22 chapters of Genesis). Only Huston himself as Noah escapes heavy-handedness. Definitely one time you should read the Book instead. Filmed in Dimension 150.
 

Domino

Pigeon
The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945)

Here’s a clip I think all members of THIS forum can appreciate
It’s a man’s world!
Better times.
 

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
What did that critic find to be agnostic about it?
No idea. Perhaps she elaborates in her book as these reviews by Kael and Maltin that were put into Microsoft Cinemania are as concise as possible.
 
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