Must-read Books (a definitive list)

Big Jim

Gold Member
"Law of Success" by Napoleon Hill. Predecessor to his more famous "Think and Grow Rich" (also superb). These are originally 1920s and 1930s success manuals. Require a diligent approach, over time. My teenaged sons and I have just taken six months to study and apply the first work in detail.
 
Big Jim said:
"Law of Success" by Napoleon Hill. Predecessor to his more famous "Think and Grow Rich" (also superb). These are originally 1920s and 1930s success manuals. Require a diligent approach, over time. My teenaged sons and I have just taken six months to study and apply the first work in detail.
Well done sharing it with your sons!

Even though I'm not finished yet, I love the book.
 

emuelle1

Woodpecker
Gold Member
I just finished Duke's "My Awakening" last week. I consider it a must read, and highly recommend it. Can't speak for Adios America.
 

emuelle1

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Pride male said:
White Power by George Lincoln Rockwell. It is free on the internet.
Rockwell's "This Time The World" is also available for free. I have the .pdf. Haven't gotten to it yet.
 

Big Jim

Gold Member
"Think And Grow Rich" (Napoleon Hill)
"Convict Conditioning" (Paul Wade--penname)
"The Secret of the Ages" (Robert Collier)
"Scientific Advertising" (Claude Hopkins)
"Millionaire Success Habits" (Dean Graziosi)

Those I have read cover-to-cover. Some multiple times.

An idea for other members:

Install a random number generating app on your phone.

Grab a book in your rotation (one which covers principles you want to enforce permanently). Either a print copy or a digital copy.

Use the random number generator app to spit out a digital location or page number at random. Set the timer app on your phone for a specific number of minutes (I use 10 minutes per book). Start reading from the top of that page or location for the allocated time.

Grab this opportunity throughout your day whenever you can. Fill the holes in your day with empowering reading. I generally pack 40 to 60 minutes of such empowering reading into every day. Over time, the effect is remarkable.

Periodically, I work other books in and out of the rotation. Those five above are the current ones, but many others come and go. A lot of them come back too.
 

LeoneVolpe

Pelican
Gold Member
"The Prince" by Niccolo Machiavelli.

It's just as relevant today as it was over five hundred years ago, as human nature has changed very little, if at all since then. Machiavelli was truly red pill before being red pill was cool.

Any book written by Robert Greene:

"48 Laws of Power," "The Art of Seduction," "33 Strategies of War," "The 50th Law" and "Mastery."
 

Nascimento

Ostrich
Gold Member
SirTimothy said:
Moscow 1941 - Rodric Braithwaite
Historical book that mainly covers the Siege of Moscow in 1941 by the Germans. As historical books go, this one is like a microscope. It goes into detail on Soviet expansion, subsequent invasion by the Nazis, battlefield conditions, government propaganda, internal power struggles, and daily life in besieged Moscow. It quotes people from generals all the way down to peasants. The book really gives a sense of what it must have been like in that situation - the desperation, the confusion, and the relief when it was all over. The most exciting history book I know of.
I'd like to give this one a read. I just finished Russia's War by Richard Overy (recommended) so I need to take a break from WW2 first.

Any comprehensive read on the eastern front is worth studying in my opinion. It gives you an invaluable perspective on life. The hardest struggles I'll encounter in life will never hold a candle to what the average soldier had to deal with in those trenches in the winter.
 

johnwain

Pigeon
Great thread, have added a few more to the ever growing list of books to read across a wide spectrum of topics (economics, finance, politics, biographies, philosophy, history)

What I've read recently.

"Art of the deal" (and other Trump books). The original is the best, a lot of Trump's writing follows a common theme across most of his books, probably overkill to read all of his and would focus on 'Art of the Deal if you've never read. It's amazing how he still practices the common themes in that book to this very day during his presidency. 8/10

"Traders, Guns and money"
Good introduction into the world of the financial markets (specifically derivatives trading) and the culture/personality of Traders. Knowing this profession fairly well I would say it's pretty accurate. Is a long read. 6/10

"Danger and Play"
A very easy read, good brief overview and summary of Cernovich's work/personality. 5.5/10

"Flying Free" by Nigel Farage or "Londonistan" by Melanie Philippe
For anyone interested in UK, EU or the reasons behind Brexit this is a must read and good summary of the aforementioned topics. Was published years ago by the (then) leader of Ukip and one of the 'Architect's of BREXIT', Nigel Farage.

Londonistan has a stronger focus on the Islamation of the UK, over 10 years old but still extremely relevant to this day. Both 8/10

"Never eat Alone"
Excellent book on how to market yourself in your chosen career path and make the most of your opportunities. Great for anyone who especially is in a role that requires a significant amount of face2face interaction. 7/10

+2 on the recommendation of '7 Habits of Highly effective people', a strong recommendation to help with goal setting, frame of mind and getting rid of bad habits. 7/10
 
I'm surprised this one hasn't been mentioned as Dr Jordan Peterson quotes it constantly but:

The Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsy

he also recommends

War & Peace and The Idiot/Crime and Punishment from the Russian greats.
 

BoiBoi

Kingfisher
fokker said:
I really need to get a copy of Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!. I know Roosh praised it back in 2007.
I'm almost done and yeah, it's a great book. You get a really fascinating view into the mind of a very smart man.
 

Loki131

Pigeon
johnwain said:
Great thread, have added a few more to the ever growing list of books to read across a wide spectrum of topics (economics, finance, politics, biographies, philosophy, history)

What I've read recently.

"Art of the deal" (and other Trump books). The original is the best, a lot of Trump's writing follows a common theme across most of his books, probably overkill to read all of his and would focus on 'Art of the Deal if you've never read. It's amazing how he still practices the common themes in that book to this very day during his presidency. 8/10

"Traders, Guns and money"
Good introduction into the world of the financial markets (specifically derivatives trading) and the culture/personality of Traders. Knowing this profession fairly well I would say it's pretty accurate. Is a long read. 6/10

"Danger and Play"
A very easy read, good brief overview and summary of Cernovich's work/personality. 5.5/10

"Flying Free" by Nigel Farage or "Londonistan" by Melanie Philippe
For anyone interested in UK, EU or the reasons behind Brexit this is a must read and good summary of the aforementioned topics. Was published years ago by the (then) leader of Ukip and one of the 'Architect's of BREXIT', Nigel Farage.

Londonistan has a stronger focus on the Islamation of the UK, over 10 years old but still extremely relevant to this day. Both 8/10

"Never eat Alone"
Excellent book on how to market yourself in your chosen career path and make the most of your opportunities. Great for anyone who especially is in a role that requires a significant amount of face2face interaction. 7/10

+2 on the recommendation of '7 Habits of Highly effective people', a strong recommendation to help with goal setting, frame of mind and getting rid of bad habits. 7/10
I always get the sense that Cernovich isn't so much as a must read author, but one that if you read his work, it does have benefits.
 
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