Must-read Books (a definitive list)

nola

 
Fortis said:
Fair enough.

I personally think women should not learn to read at all.
It is interesting to think about what the current world would be like if women could not read, vote or hold public office.

Maybe bring back the scarlet letter as well?

Someone should write a book on that, I vote for roosh to write that. He could earn a fat stack of cash from all the leftist journalist buying it to quote it for their hit pieces.
 

Syberpunk

Pelican
Gold Member
I've finished reading Endurance (Ernest Shackleton) by Alfred Lansig and every few pages I felt I was not worthy of what I was reading.



Every page had me hanging on, I'm ashamed to say as an Irish man, I was aware of the story but truly I didn't know anything about it. My eyes were spinning in my head at what 28 men went through over the course of two plus year separated from the world.

Quite literally the most anti-soy story you will ever read. An antidote to every film you've seen and moral relativism story of the last century. The thoughts of this odyssey/ordeal being filmed in the right way would single handedly course correct our societies (half joking). Every story within a 100 mile radius could fuck off compared to this one and looks like a child's finger painting.

A PETA REEEEEEEE fest: dogs, penguins, sea lions birds murdered over and over and in the most savage ways.

If you want a mind reboot on what you're capable of, read this. Yes it is sometimes repetitive, sprawling and you will be sick of the term "ice floes" much like the men themselves. The story is fucking ludicrious. I felt like I was being driven bonkers along with them.

We've devolved in a very real sense. This was an Age of Heroes, truly feels mythic. The way they maintain composure and even smile in the face of death consistently....at sub zero temperatures for two years, wearing same clothes for two years

Stop what you're doing and buy. Even halfway though it, I felt changed by it. Shackleton and his men, who quickly become "as helpless and isolated from the outside world as if they were on another planet," show you, just as quickly, the best that humans can be.

I was going to put it in the positivity page. The book has an understated feel to the descriptions and yet its incredibly tense.
 

Richard Turpin

Kingfisher
Syberpunk's review of 'Endurance' and the amazon reviews I've read so far have got me interested. Should be right up my alley. Will buy it next payday. I agree, that this was an 'age of heroes' and it just feels like we're all now just picking over the bones of what's left to achieve.

In writing that, I'm reminded of a quote by Jack Donovan;

'How long will men be satisfied to replay and reinvent the conflict dramas of the past through books and movies and games, without the hope of experiencing any meaningful conflict in their own lives? When will we grow tired of hearing the stories of great men long dead? How long will men tolerate this state of relative dishonor, knowing that their ancestors were stronger men, harder men, more courageous men—and knowing that this heritage of strength survives in them, but that their own potential for manly virtue, for glory, for honor, will be wasted?'

I've already said 'Might Is Right' but I'll add 'The Sea Wolf' to my list of must-reads. Stirring stuff. Oh, and 'The Way Of Men' as well.
 

Eusebius

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Pride male said:
Is Tale of 2 cities a must read?
Nope. It's actually one of Dickens' weakest works, and atypical for him. My favorite Dickens is probably Bleak House, but if you're new to the author I'd suggest starting with Great Expectations.
 
RawGod said:
Pride male said:
Is Tale of 2 cities a must read?
Nope. It's actually one of Dickens' weakest works, and atypical for him. My favorite Dickens is probably Bleak House, but if you're new to the author I'd suggest starting with Great Expectations.
Tale of Two Cities didn't feel like a book. It was incredibly generic and I couldn't connect with the story or any of the characters. They seemed incredibly one-dimensional. Too much allegory drawing from Christ like figures. The opening monologue is probably the best part.
 
I can't believe nobody has mentioned "Fup" by Jim Dodge.

Or maybe it's here but I can't find it...3 characters is too short for search function.

The most redpill book I've ever read...lovely. Economical too.
 

Leads

Robin
Fanatical Prospecting by Jeb Blount

Brilliant Biz book, highly ranked on Amazon. After reading several similar sales books, this one really made an impact. Humorous style of writing brought a bit of entertainment, while dropping heavy knowledge bombs.

Always looking for more so let me your faves. I only read non fiction biz books
 

Alsos

Kingfisher
Richard Turpin said:
Syberpunk's review of 'Endurance' and the amazon reviews I've read so far have got me interested. Should be right up my alley. Will buy it next payday. I agree, that this was an 'age of heroes' and it just feels like we're all now just picking over the bones of what's left to achieve.

In writing that, I'm reminded of a quote by Jack Donovan;

'How long will men be satisfied to replay and reinvent the conflict dramas of the past through books and movies and games, without the hope of experiencing any meaningful conflict in their own lives? When will we grow tired of hearing the stories of great men long dead? How long will men tolerate this state of relative dishonor, knowing that their ancestors were stronger men, harder men, more courageous men—and knowing that this heritage of strength survives in them, but that their own potential for manly virtue, for glory, for honor, will be wasted?'

I've already said 'Might Is Right' but I'll add 'The Sea Wolf' to my list of must-reads. Stirring stuff. Oh, and 'The Way Of Men' as well.
Home of the Blizzard is another good read in the Heroic Age of Exploration vein, if you haven't already read it (it's the story of the Australian South Pole expedition under Douglas Mawson). You have to read through a lot of the book as setup for Mawson's account of his own disastrous sledging excursion, but it's worth it. Dudes were badass, especially Mawson himself.
 
I recently read "Thinking, Fast and Slow" by Daniel Kahnemann & Amos Tversky as well as "Nudge" & "Misbehaving" from Robert Thaler. Those guys cross-reference each other since they worked together, and I've stumbled upon them by Nassim Taleb that cheeky cunt kept hyping them up in his book. All of them essentially talk about the failing of economists, but though the aforementioned kept a respectfully worded "well, maybe economists are quiiiite right" distance Nassim Taleb went nuclear with the "economists are faggots and basically read these Kahnemann researcher guys or you're an asshole".

Anyway, their book deals with psychology and economics, namely how to enrich the sterile, rationality based approach of economics with the proper psychology of how ACTUAL humans behave to bring it more in line with reality. Kahneman & Tversky come more from the pure psychology direction and thus deal with biases, heuristics and psychological models of behavior, while Thaler comes from economics originally and was a curious dabbler in psychology. Together, these dudes pioneered the field of new behavioral economics.

Why I liked these books so much is they remind me of my times studying econ in college. We started out learning that neoclassical model of the markets, and it always struck me as ass-backward and wrong. You know, complete markets, no information asymmetry, everyone is rational and so in tune with all their wants and desires that they can formulate their precise equilibrium points. What human behaves like this? This was more of a theory made to describe robots. And thus during college times, I felt this feeling of "why am I wasting time with this bullshit". Now I find this books, it's like a relief. Finally someone also starts to consider how actual humans behave in the markets!
 

RedKurrant

Sparrow
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned The Count of Monte Cristo. Written by Dumas, it's an adventure novel about a young French sailor who was falsely imprisoned during the early 19th Century.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
Pride male said:
Is Gone Girl a must read?
No, but it is nice to have a female villain.

I liked her debut novel, "Sharp Objects," in which pretty much all the women were evil, from moms down to the town hot teen manipulator.
 
+1 any Trump book.

Also there's a good book by Newt Gringich, 'Understanding Trump'. Great for shutting up any mindless Trump-basher.

Anything Nassim N Taleb. 100 great ideas in each book.

Jerry Weintraub 'When I stop Talking You'll Know I'm Dead' - great story, inspirational.

General tip - Amazon unlimited. $7.99 a month then all books are free. As they have no value (in a way) you can just zip through them. A lot of the free books rip-off and quote published authors, so you get the same ideas for free.
 

Richard Turpin

Kingfisher
RedKurrant said:
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned The Count of Monte Cristo. Written by Dumas, it's an adventure novel about a young French sailor who was falsely imprisoned during the early 19th Century.
RedKurrant, yep, 'The Count of Monte Cristo' is superb. I'm comfortable with classifying it as a 'Must-read'. It gets a mention in other threads, like this one 'Whenever you finish a book, post it here';

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-43544-post-1781087.html#pid1781087

I've added some of my favourite quotes from the book to the above thread.
 
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