My sister vaccinated my 7 year old niece

Denam8487

Sparrow
Catholic
Against the wishes of my mother.

And why did she do this? Because our Canadian cousin-in-law who fiercely promotes the transgender agenda told her that she wouldn't be safe. My sister didn't wait for more information to come out or consult me to get my input.

We all grew up in a Catholic household and I was the only one of us to keep the faith (even though my sister will still go up and receive Communion on Christmas despite not having a Catholic wedding or ever going to Church.)

It's keeping in line with bad behavior as she refuses to baptize both of her children. My sister also seems to have disdain for her son who is 3-years old. She was staying at home to raise my niece but before he turned a year old she reentered the workforce and now works for Google putting in 70 hour weeks even though her husband makes more than enough to support them. So they hire third world immigrants to watch their kids. She buys LOL dolls for my niece without any second thought despite the fact that they're priming young girls for promiscuous lifestyles.

It shouldn't have come as a shock that she would give my niece the sacrament of the Death Cult but somehow it still was. Three months ago she tried to guilt me into getting the shot because "Delta is a gamechanger" and she refuses to come home to see my parents for Christmas because my mom helps babysit our daughter.

It's all so tiresome.
 

Denam8487

Sparrow
Catholic
You should take this as a clue. She isn't interested in what you have to say so you shouldn't waste your time. Based on your description, I would remove this person from my life.

Unfortunately I’ve come to that same conclusion. We may not see one another for years to come and I doubt our future conversations will be much beyond wishing each other well on holidays and birthdays.

I was always in her shadow growing up because she’s 5 years older than me and I always sought her advice. Now, I find her character questionable at best and there’s not much to talk about as long as she’s going along with the global agenda.

She’s one among many in my family that I’ve lost touch with over the past 2 years. But Christ told us that this would happen in Matthew’s Gospel so I shouldn’t be surprised.
 

MajorStyles

Pelican
Catholic
Unfortunately I’ve come to that same conclusion. We may not see one another for years to come and I doubt our future conversations will be much beyond wishing each other well on holidays and birthdays.

I was always in her shadow growing up because she’s 5 years older than me and I always sought her advice. Now, I find her character questionable at best and there’s not much to talk about as long as she’s going along with the global agenda.

She’s one among many in my family that I’ve lost touch with over the past 2 years. But Christ told us that this would happen in Matthew’s Gospel so I shouldn’t be surprised.

I think that a lot of us are in a similar boat—losing faith in those that we once admired. This is one of the most difficult aspects of the plandemic. The globalist lies are somewhat palatable, since we can keep them at an arm’s distance (more or less). But when they’ve infiltrated our parents, our siblings, our long-time friends….then the damage hits home.
 

andy dufresne

Pelican
Other Christian
I think that a lot of us are in a similar boat—losing faith in those that we once admired. This is one of the most difficult aspects of the plandemic. The globalist lies are somewhat palatable, since we can keep them at an arm’s distance (more or less). But when they’ve infiltrated our parents, our siblings, our long-time friends….then the damage hits home.
My Mother, a woman who I once regarded as the most intelligent person I've known is now triple jabbed and refuses at all to question the narrative. She also grew up with parents who lived near Nazi Germany. I can't understand how she doesn't see it.

I can't believe how many good people have fallen for this evil.
 

Denam8487

Sparrow
Catholic
My Mother, a woman who I once regarded as the most intelligent person I've known is now triple jabbed and refuses at all to question the narrative. She also grew up with parents who lived near Nazi Germany. I can't understand how she doesn't see it.

I can't believe how many good people have fallen for this evil.

Outside of my family the only person (aside from my wife) that I know who has let me know that they haven't gotten the shot is my Muay Thai coach who is a Muslim immigrant from Morocco who competes professionally. When I asked him why, he told me that he doesn't need it and that he thinks it would mess up his training regimen.

A third world immigrant Muslim is literally the only other person I know that has held out.
 

nagareboshi

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Like other people often say on this forum, I suggest keeping silent and avoiding immediate conflict while praying for this person. It is very sad but you shouldn't give up on her in your heart. She is your sister by blood, assigned to your family by God for a reason, and she is leading little souls in her family towards suffering. This past year I noticed that my encounters with family members were greatly improved when I stopped arguing and prayed privately instead.
 

NoMoreTO

Hummingbird
Catholic
I agree with @nagareboshi. If you are able to maintain a relationship with your sister, you can have a positive influence on her and her children as an uncle and provide them with a view into "another path" and an alternative perspective on things. Every person will have an opportunity at salvation, and while the children have the vax, they didn't really make the choice themselves.

It is sad that she is receives communion while not being "in communion" with the Church, or receiving the sacrament of penance. Perhaps there is a way to explain to her that this is considered a sacrilege, but I think you'd have to do that in steps using a level of persuasion. Many Catholics do this now, in part because they do not receive proper instruction, but obviously this rests on the individual. It is disturbing how someone who doesn't want to baptize their children, or speaks against Church teaching, still insists they have a right to receive. To me it is some sort of movement where they feel that they are still Catholic, and that the Church should adjust to them. Which sadly on the ground level the Church does appear to cave, but confession is a requirement at least once a year.
 

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
She sounds like my sister who got her 6 yr old daughter vaxxed this week.

Far left lunatic.

But in the end, you can only do so much. It's not as it was when we were little kids. She's a mother and a wife now. She's living her life as an adult thousands of miles from me. I wouldn't expect her to consult with you on whether she would vax her child, just as my sister wouldn't consult with me.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Your niece is not your own. You have no right or claim upon her upbringing. The mother can do whatever she wants with the child. If she wants your input on upbringing then great, but if not, and she refuses the truth you have attempted to lovingly share, pray for her intently. The stronger your faith, the more power your prayers will have to make a difference. Christ calls us to love everyone, including our enemies, even relatives that make dumb decisions.
 
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Denam8487

Sparrow
Catholic
Your niece is not your own. You have no right or claim upon her upbringing. The mother can do whatever she wants with the child. If she wants your input on upbringing then great, but if not, and she refuses the truth you have attempted to lovingly share, pray for her intently. The stronger your faith, the more power your prayers will have to make a difference. Christ calls us to love everyone, including our enemies, and even relatives that make dumb decisions.

Amen, brother.
 
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MajorStyles

Pelican
Catholic
My Mother, a woman who I once regarded as the most intelligent person I've known is now triple jabbed and refuses at all to question the narrative. She also grew up with parents who lived near Nazi Germany. I can't understand how she doesn't see it.

I can't believe how many good people have fallen for this evil.

I somethimes wonder if the passage, "Many are called but few are chosen" applies here. There is some cosmic force at work beyond our understanding.
 

Denam8487

Sparrow
Catholic
Sooooo...whats the child's fathers position in all this?
Your guess is as good as mine. He’s a workaholic who plays with them on the weekends. He’s either completely onboard or apathetic and blindly trusts my sister.

Unfortunately many husbands will just go along with their wives so they don’t have to fulfill their role as head of the household and spiritual priest.
 

NoMoreTO

Hummingbird
Catholic
Your guess is as good as mine. He’s a workaholic who plays with them on the weekends. He’s either completely onboard or apathetic and blindly trusts my sister.

Unfortunately many husbands will just go along with their wives so they don’t have to fulfill their role as head of the household and spiritual priest.

I remember reading the 40 hour workweek. Tim Ferris made a great point back then about our society. People feel if they provide money, or are making money that they are successful. But truly, life is so much more than making bank in your job. The father most likely sees providing for his children as his primary duty, and while this is true in many respects, it is equally true that his childrens' virtue, morals, Faith is as much his responsibility as the roof over their heads and the food in their bellies.
 

Feyoder

Pelican
Like other people often say on this forum, I suggest keeping silent and avoiding immediate conflict while praying for this person. It is very sad but you shouldn't give up on her in your heart. She is your sister by blood, assigned to your family by God for a reason, and she is leading little souls in her family towards suffering. This past year I noticed that my encounters with family members were greatly improved when I stopped arguing and prayed privately instead.

No there should be conflict. You should make it clear forcefully and passionately that what she’s doing is absolutely abysmal. As much as you think your responsibility to your niece demands it.

Personally, if it were me, when the niece grows up I want to have a good answer if she ever asks “what did you say when they vaxed me?”
 

OrthoSerb

Sparrow
Orthodox
No there should be conflict. You should make it clear forcefully and passionately that what she’s doing is absolutely abysmal. As much as you think your responsibility to your niece demands it.

Personally, if it were me, when the niece grows up I want to have a good answer if she ever asks “what did you say when they vaxed me?”
And where is the discernment in creating family conflict, especially after the child has received the vaccine? You're suggesting Denam8487 should create this demonstrative conflict in order to be able to say he did something (that didn't make a positive difference) if he get's asked what he did in a decade. Personally I prefer Roosh's suggestion of forbearance and prayer. This also leaves open the possibility that his sister will actually turn to him when she needs some help or guidance. You seem to think that you can forcefeed people truth at a time and place of your choosing and then write them off if they can't digest it. If you've created conflict and introduced emotional distance, it will be that much harder and that much more unlikely that she will be able to have a meaningful relationship with Denam8487. She will have to overcome the passions of bitterness, pride, judgement and anger etc. I don't see any wisdom in going down this path, it seems demonic.

What you're suggesting reminded me of this commentary by Saint Paisios:

A Christian must not be fanatical; he must have love for and be sensitive towards all people. Those who inconsiderately toss out comments, even if they are true, can cause harm.

I once met a theologian who was extremely pious, but who had the habit of speaking to the secular people around him in a very blunt manner; his method penetrated so deeply that it shook them very severely. He told me once: “During a gathering, I said such and such a thing to a lady.” But the way that he said it, crushed her. “Look”, I said to him, “you may be tossing golden crowns studded with diamonds to other people, but the way that you throw them can smash heads, not only the sensitive ones, but the sound ones also.”

Let’s not stone our fellow-man in a so-called “Christian manner.” The person who – in the presence of others – checks someone for having sinned (or speaks in an impassioned manner about a certain person), is not moved by the Spirit of God; he is moved by another spirit.

The way of the Church is love; it differs from the way of the legalists. The Church sees everything with tolerance and seeks to help each person, whatever he may have done, however sinful he may be.

I have observed a peculiar kind of logic in certain pious people. Their piety is a good thing, and their predisposition for good is also a good thing; however, a certain spiritual discernment and amplitude is required so that their piety is not accompanied by narrow-mindedness or strong-headedness. Someone who is truly in a spiritual state must possess and exemplify spiritual discernment; otherwise he will forever remain attached to the “letter of the Law”, and the letter of the Law can be quite deadly.

A truly humble person never behaves like a teacher; he will listen, and, whenever his opinion is requested, he responds humbly. In other words, he replies like a student. He who believes that he is capable of correcting others is filled with egotism.

A person that begins to do something with a good intention and eventually reaches an extreme point, lacks true discernment. His actions exemplify a latent type of egotism that is hidden beneath this behavior; he is unaware of it, because he does not know himself that well, which is why he goes to extremes.
 

Denam8487

Sparrow
Catholic
And where is the discernment in creating family conflict, especially after the child has received the vaccine? You're suggesting Denam8487 should create this demonstrative conflict in order to be able to say he did something (that didn't make a positive difference) if he get's asked what he did in a decade. Personally I prefer Roosh's suggestion of forbearance and prayer. This also leaves open the possibility that his sister will actually turn to him when she needs some help or guidance. You seem to think that you can forcefeed people truth at a time and place of your choosing and then write them off if they can't digest it. If you've created conflict and introduced emotional distance, it will be that much harder and that much more unlikely that she will be able to have a meaningful relationship with Denam8487. She will have to overcome the passions of bitterness, pride, judgement and anger etc. I don't see any wisdom in going down this path, it seems demonic.

What you're suggesting reminded me of this commentary by Saint Paisios:



I pray and fast for her every day. My father-in-law (who’s a fisherman) said that the reason Jesus picked fishermen as catcher of men is that they understood timing and methods.
 

infowarrior1

Crow
Protestant
Your guess is as good as mine. He’s a workaholic who plays with them on the weekends. He’s either completely onboard or apathetic and blindly trusts my sister.

Unfortunately many husbands will just go along with their wives so they don’t have to fulfill their role as head of the household and spiritual priest.

And to add to the previous commentator. He is by being a workaholic making an Idol of that work and career. He isn't having his priorities straight. And has failed in his duty of being a Father for reasons as mentioned by @NoMoreTO previously.
 
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Geo Martin

Robin
Catholic
Your niece is not your own. You have no right or claim upon her upbringing. The mother can do whatever she wants with the child. If she wants your input on upbringing then great, but if not, and she refuses the truth you have attempted to lovingly share, pray for her intently. The stronger your faith, the more power your prayers will have to make a difference. Christ calls us to love everyone, including our enemies, even relatives that make dumb decisions.
Absolutely we should pray for their conversion, but at the same time the bible tells in many many passages us to not associate with people who willingly disobey the Lord, and the woman described sounds to me like one of those.
 
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