Naming your son '<your name> Jr'

PixelFree

Kingfisher
Ghibellino said:
If the goal is to signal good breeding in an Anglo context,

Ahhh OK, now I get it. It's to signal good breeding. i.e. you have a close, tight knit family AND know who your Dad was AND he has an identity worth passing on AND it's something other elite do.

Reminds me of how family trees are 'racist'... because only certain people can trace their lineage on 23andme and Ancestry.com from those uploaded ship logs and other historical documents.
 

bugsy

Chicken
Kids benefit from high expectations, sense of tradition, heritage, and purpose. The intent of so many cultural traditions is to inculcate children with a sense of who they are supposed to be and where they come from. And an inherited name also serves this purpose.

Having said that, it's kind of creepy and weird. LeBron regrets naming his son after himself.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/amp/world-us-canada-44978813
 

Dallas Winston

Ostrich
Gold Member
A lot of the American astronauts during the space race were juniors. I think it was the Mercury astronauts.

Some popular news piece came out back then explaining that juniors, at least back in those days, tended to have a high likelihood of success in life.

My Dad explained this to me when explaining why I was a Jr.

Made sense to me. I've done alright.
 
I'm a non Jr. - no issue here. First sons' had special privledges throughout history, maybe that is the way it should be.

This is a traditional thing, and modern society is really against it. They are against us shaping our son in our image so to speak. But if the Father is a good man, this is exactly what he should be doing.

All of this, "my kid is an individual and his uniqueness is for us to discover" is modern bull shit. Yes, we know each person is unique, but families also have an inheritance, an ethos, a tie to history and ancestry. Naming your child after a relative, or giving a JR. or II is a good thing.

This is a very well thought out perspective on the subject, and I whole heartedly agree!
My wife is due in May and she is fully supportive of our son taking my name. For me, it was just instinctual and not even a question. My first name is my GGdads, second name is my Gdads as well as my dads, so my son will have mine and my second son will have my dads. It's a badass patriarchal pattern!
 

Leafcutter

Chicken
My first born son is named after me, but we just refer to him by his middle name (which is also his baptismal name). No need for "junior" in informal speech.
 

Hypno

Crow
My first born son is named after me, but we just refer to him by his middle name (which is also his baptismal name). No need for "junior" in informal speech.

This is very common in the South. Many men go by their middle name in informal speech, especially if all threee names are identical to their fathers name.

Also, you can name your son after a male ancestor, like a grandfather, in which case he is Grandfthers' Name the Second rather than Junior.

Personally I didn't want my son to feel he had any pressure to be like me or on to follow in my footsteps. I hope he makes some different career choices than I did, and I have worked very hard to give him the freedom to do just that. On the the other hand, if I knew he was going to be as much like me as he is then I woudl have named him Junior.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
All Russians' middle names are patronymics—a form of the father's name. I think it contributes to the stability of the society. It's one of those things that's just off the table, the way it is, a settled question.
Same with Bulgaria, although in Bulgaria my wife grew up under Russian communism.

She and her sister have the same middle name. Liubamirova, the female version of Liubamire. It's weird seeing it written in English. Любамирова. That's better.

It's how it's done over there.

In America I'm no fan of passing down first names. I strongly believe a child, particularly a boy, needs to take hold of his own path and destiny. It's your job as a father to create the hunger and desire for your son to be the best he can be, and help him achieve it. I also think living in the shadow of a super successful father is an unfair burden and the expectations can dissuade the child from truly forging his own path and identity.
 
If the goal is to signal good breeding in an Anglo context, you’d be better off using the mother’s maiden name as a middle name, possibly combined with another middle name. Throughout Europe, including Britain, it used to be popular to name the first child after the paternal grandparent of the corresponding gender, the second after the corresponding maternal grandparent, the third one after the corresponding parent, and so on; this rule is still followed amongst the more traditionally minded Greeks and Italians. It was, of course, never a hard rule: Pitt the Younger was the Elder’s second son.

It is certainly still a thing in Italy. Luigi, and Francesco, are the 1st, and 2nd most common male baby names in Italy today.

My grandfather wanted originally to christen my father Mario, after his brother that died fighting during WW2. However, after experiencing two stillbirths before my father was born, an alternative first name was given. Mario then became my father's middle name.

The tradition is still fairly strong among second and third generation Greek/Italian migrants. You would see a young Demetrius in Australia today.

Meanwhile, in the English speaking countries, you wouldn't meet a Mabel, or Dorothy under 80.
 

Cervantes

Woodpecker
Woman
Naming a son after the father is a bad idea.

First it telegraphs the vanity of the father to give his own name to his son. I agree with @rainy that it puts the child in the shadow of the father. The exception to this is families where the men have had the same first name for several generations and all of them are called by their middle name.

The other thing wrong with it is that it robs the family of an opportunity to honor an ancestor. You should be naming your children after your parents and grandparents. Each child should get a first name and a middle name, and at least one of those names should honor someone in your family. This also helps a child build an identity as part of the continuity of a family - with responsibility to the ancestors - and to the future. And it prevents you from giving one of your kids a dumb name which is trendy for the year they are born. (Lol @ Jaxen, Konnor, Brysen)

Do your genealogy and you will find long patterns of 2-3 names going back hundreds of years as children are named successively after a grandfather or great-grandfather. Choose one of those names. Likely you will find many such lines along the various ancestor families. Each child will give you a change to honor one of those lines. Another reason to have many children.
 
I don't have my father's name, and I don't plan on naming my son after myself, but I don't personally see anything wrong with the practice. I know people who are Jr's and they don't seem to have any problems with living in the "shadow" of the father. Also, I think the idea of the ancient practice, is not so much that the child should live under the shadow of his father, but rather grow into the image of that father. It basically says to the son that you are part of a lineage and a family tradition. By the logic that naming a child after the father it strips his identity, then it would also follow that the child should have no last name either. Wouldn't want him feeling boxed in by the expectations of the family, would we?

Also a lot of the arguments being made here don't really follow any logical pattern.

You can't name a son after his father, that robs him of his identity, name him after his grandfather instead!

You child is literally your flesh and blood. I share a lot of traits with my father and his father, despite not having either one of their names.
 
My family has a fairly proud history so we like to keep continuity. Rather than doing juniors though, we alternate first and middle names. My first name is my firstborns middle name, which is my grandfathers first name. We have been doing this since before the civil war and it works well for us. We keep the sense of family pride without the confusion and weirdness. Also, being a Southern family we all have nicknames for daily use anyway.
 
Glad this is a topic. I've never liked it much as there are so many names to choose that adds to the spectrum. My birth giver has a tendency to name kids after the relatives of the guy she's with and hers, even if it's a grossly outdated name. I got off lucky. One good thing my sperm donor did for me.
 

Red Wings

Pigeon
Glad this is a topic. I've never liked it much as there are so many names to choose that adds to the spectrum. My birth giver has a tendency to name kids after the relatives of the guy she's with and hers, even if it's a grossly outdated name. I got off lucky. One good thing my sperm donor did for me.
your birth giver? lol what
 
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