Netflix Thread

Salinger

Kingfisher
I'm ready to drop Netflix. Most of the movies or series on there are promoting degeneracy or the New World Order. Your choices are dark and depressing, oppression from Big Brother, promotion of a gay agenda, or dumb comedies for the dumbest of our society.

Try to find an older movie on there before the year 2000. They are few and far between. You can't tell me that people don't want to see Academy Award winners or indie favorites of the 70s, 80s, and 90s. So I can only guess that this is part of their sick plan to pretend that Heritage America never existed. Or maybe there's just too many white people in those old movies...
 

kel

Ostrich
I won't give money to pedo orgs, and despite it falling out of fashion you can still find everything on torrent trackers (you can stream an awful lot, too, even). Also, I'm gradually collecting media for just that reason - books are being banned or rewritten, movies and TV shows are being black holed or censored or "reimagined" to match the narrative, etc. You have to own media in a format that can not be changed or taken away (e.g. physical books, movies in physical format or a .mp4 file that you have on your harddrive). This is going to be a serious problem in the very near future, I think.
 
I would recommend

1. After Life -- because it's about love, losses and survival after losses that bring you to an edge of self-destruction

3. Californication, because it gives a good picture of how tragicomical a fornicative lyfestyle can get

2. The Kominsky Method as a good picturing of getting older in a nice way

4. The Ozarks, because it's about choices you make that define your life. Also, a good methaphor for dealing with forces and energies that can literally destroy your life and/or the lives of people you love, about idealisation, trust and forgiveness

5. The 100. Despite of it's sci-fi setting and good methahorical description of how to deal with people you'd kill -- or who would kill you, but you just have to deal with them because both your side and theirs have to fight a same threat.
 

Salinger

Kingfisher
I would recommend

1. After Life -- because it's about love, losses and survival after losses that bring you to an edge of self-destruction

The first season of After Life is pretty damn funny. Season 2 however has been a total letdown. The writing isn't as good and the comedy has all but disappeared. Gervais also ventures into some really disgusting territory which turned me off.

I wish I was the writer for this show. The parents with the kid who looks like Hitler could've been comedy gold. So much to do with that story but it fell short. He really needs to hire a writing staff instead of doing it all himself.
 

Hell_Is_Like_Newark

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I checked out a Norwegian series called 'Occupy'. I was turned on to it by a review by Steve Sailer in Takimag.

The premise:
  • The Middle East is in a total war, cutting off the supply of oil and gas to Europe.
  • Russia is resurgent militarily and economically (not stated but likely due to now getting a premium on its exports to Asia).
  • The primary oil and gas supplier to Europe is Norway. Norway gets hit by a climate change induced hurricane, which kills hundreds. The disaster propels the Green Party to power, which shuts down the oil & gas industry to combat climate change.
  • The USA is energy independent and left NATO, no longer provided superpower protections to Norway.
The EU freaks out and invites Russia to re-start the Norwegian oil and gas exports. Russia sends in Spetsnaz to kidnap the Norwegian Prime Minister, forcing him under threat to not resist Russian occupation forces.

There is an interesting dynamic with how the women are portrayed in the series (see the link to Sailer's article above for details). The writers were subtle on the digs into Norwegian feminism and left me wondering if some of the writers read Roosh.

I found it interesting that the US ambassador was portrayed as a homosexual and a wormy douche of a human being.

I am now on the 3rd season and so far the series is good. It is refreshingly (relatively) free of "wokisms": There is no super-female saving the day from incompetent White men and the Climate Change plot element is just that.. a plot element (no lecturing the viewer). The character development of Prime Minister is interesting as he goes from a whiny environmentalist to a man who ruthlessly pursues getting the Russian out.
 
Watch the show called "Eureka."

Definitely agree. I remember many fun nights of my family gathering to watch it. Very fun sci-fi themes.

Recently, I've been watching the first season a German show called "Dark." It has it's default-Netflix-forced sex, drug use, and infidelity in the first half of the show, and of course Netflix has to hold religion is a questionable light, but if you can look past those it's been a pretty good thriller.

The constant sex, drugs, violence, and "hurr durr no man in sky" has been particularly prevalent from Netflix recently. I'm happy I'm piggybacking off someone else's account.
 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member
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griffinmill

Kingfisher
The first season of After Life is pretty damn funny. Season 2 however has been a total letdown. The writing isn't as good and the comedy has all but disappeared. Gervais also ventures into some really disgusting territory which turned me off.

I wish I was the writer for this show. The parents with the kid who looks like Hitler could've been comedy gold. So much to do with that story but it fell short. He really needs to hire a writing staff instead of doing it all himself.

Ricky Gervais used to be great. The Office and Extras are really funny sitcoms. But he had a writing partner on those projects. Now his stuff is steeped in sentimentality. I think that previous writing partner (Stephen Merchant) kept him in check.
 

budoslavic

Owl
Gold Member
Andrew Torba:
Reminder that the co-founder and first CEO of Netflix, Marc Bernays Randolph, is directly related to Edward Bernays (and Freud.) Bernays is widely considered the father of modern propaganda and literally wrote a book called “Propaganda.”

Netflix is not entertainment.

It is a propaganda machine.

Remember this when you and your kids watch it. Cancel it. Keep it out of your home.


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Salinger

Kingfisher
Most of the movies or series on there are promoting degeneracy or the New World Order. Your choices are dark and depressing, oppression from Big Brother, promotion of a gay agenda, or dumb comedies for the dumbest of our society. Try to find an older movie on there before the year 2000. They are few and far between. You can't tell me that people don't want to see Academy Award winners or indie favorites of the 70s, 80s, and 90s. So I can only guess that this is part of their sick plan to pretend that Heritage America never existed. Or maybe there's just too many white people in those old movies...

That sounds like something I would say... :hmm:
 
I'm ready to drop Netflix. Most of the movies or series on there are promoting degeneracy or the New World Order. Your choices are dark and depressing, oppression from Big Brother, promotion of a gay agenda, or dumb comedies for the dumbest of our society.

Try to find an older movie on there before the year 2000. They are few and far between. You can't tell me that people don't want to see Academy Award winners or indie favorites of the 70s, 80s, and 90s. So I can only guess that this is part of their sick plan to pretend that Heritage America never existed. Or maybe there's just too many white people in those old movies...
They can't license any decent movies because they can't get the rights. Netflix streaming originally blew up because the media companies that licensed them content on the cheap didn't realize they were feeding the beast that would devour them. They just thought it was going to be some niche ancillary revenue stream. Notice on Amazon and other platforms, good movies still have to rented or bought individually. That's why a majority of their content is originals now. Netflix was more interesting in the early 2010s, when it was mostly a repository to monetize random/forgotten content. I assume that's part of the reason there were so many interesting documentaries on the platform, as there isn't much opportunity to monetize that type of content. Some on this forum may even be too young to remember, but it wasn't that long ago that Netflix, and streaming services in general were considered a low rent distribution platform below even Red Box and basic cable.
 

Salinger

Kingfisher
They can't license any decent movies because they can't get the rights. Netflix streaming originally blew up because the media companies that licensed them content on the cheap didn't realize they were feeding the beast that would devour them. They just thought it was going to be some niche ancillary revenue stream. Notice on Amazon and other platforms, good movies still have to rented or bought individually. That's why a majority of their content is originals now. Netflix was more interesting in the early 2010s, when it was mostly a repository to monetize random/forgotten content. I assume that's part of the reason there were so many interesting documentaries on the platform, as there isn't much opportunity to monetize that type of content. Some on this forum may even be too young to remember, but it wasn't that long ago that Netflix, and streaming services in general were considered a low rent distribution platform below even Red Box and basic cable.

How else would these studios make money on home video if they didn't lease(?) the rights to companies like Netflix, especially for older movies? In the past it was Blockbuster Video who they made money off in this area. So what's the difference now that Netflix has taken over the role of the video stores in the 80s and 90s?
 
How else would these studios make money on home video if they didn't lease(?) the rights to companies like Netflix, especially for older movies? In the past it was Blockbuster Video who they made money off in this area. So what's the difference now that Netflix has taken over the role of the video stores in the 80s and 90s?
You can rent/buy individual movies to stream on many platforms, Amazon being the most prominent. Now there's of course an argument that there isn't enough people willing to pay to stream a movie to bother throttling its distribution this way, but I think the studios want to protect their assets and not go the music route, where consumers are almost completely trained to not pay for any individual song or album. Once you start licensing your content wholesale on the cheap, consumers become entitled and lazy, and don't expect to pay for a premium product. Streaming deals are pocket change compared to what these studios and media companies used to make off physical media sales, and they don't want to become slaves to the whims of Netflix.
 
You can rent/buy individual movies to stream on many platforms, Amazon being the most prominent. Now there's of course an argument that there isn't enough people willing to pay to stream a movie to bother throttling its distribution this way, but I think the studios want to protect their assets and not go the music route, where consumers are almost completely trained to not pay for any individual song or album. Once you start licensing your content wholesale on the cheap, consumers become entitled and lazy, and don't expect to pay for a premium product. Streaming deals are pocket change compared to what these studios and media companies used to make off physical media sales, and they don't want to become slaves to the whims of Netflix.


Jews jewing other jews.
 
How else would these studios make money on home video if they didn't lease(?) the rights to companies like Netflix, especially for older movies? In the past it was Blockbuster Video who they made money off in this area. So what's the difference now that Netflix has taken over the role of the video stores in the 80s and 90s?
I first heard of Netflix in 2004. Netflix would actually send you a movie DVD in the mail. You watch it, then return it to Netflix. This part of Netflix actually still exists if you can believe that.

 

Salinger

Kingfisher
I first heard of Netflix in 2004. Netflix would actually send you a movie DVD in the mail. You watch it, then return it to Netflix. This part of Netflix actually still exists if you can believe that.


That's because their selection is much better than the streaming service. 99% of the movies made before 2000 that they own rights too are only available by DVD.
 
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