New cars come with 4G connections that phone home your location

Roosh

Cardinal
Car manufacturers now include "free" 4G connections in the car so they know your location, driving style, and even phone call history. But don't worry, it's "anonymized" so the treasure trove of data is safe with them. It also allows the car to more easily remote controlled.

Behind the wheel, it’s nothing but you, the open road — and your car quietly recording your every move.

On a recent drive, a 2017 Chevrolet collected my precise location. It stored my phone’s ID and the people I called. It judged my acceleration and braking style, beaming back reports to its maker General Motors over an always-on Internet connection.

Cars have become the most sophisticated computers many of us own, filled with hundreds of sensors. Even older models know an awful lot about you. Many copy over personal data as soon as you plug in a smartphone.

But for the thousands you spend to buy a car, the data it produces doesn’t belong to you. My Chevy’s dashboard didn’t say what the car was recording. It wasn’t in the owner’s manual. There was no way to download it.

To glimpse my car data, I had to hack my way in.

We’re at a turning point for driving surveillance: In the 2020 model year, most new cars sold in the United States will come with built-in Internet connections, including 100 percent of Fords, GMs and BMWs and all but one model Toyota and Volkswagen. (This independent cellular service is often included free or sold as an add-on.) Cars are becoming smartphones on wheels, sending and receiving data from apps, insurance firms and pretty much wherever their makers want. Some brands even reserve the right to use the data to track you down if you don’t pay your bills.

When I buy a car, I assume the data I produce is owned by me — or at least is controlled by me. Many automakers do not. They act like how and where we drive, also known as telematics, isn’t personal information.

I took my Chevy to the levee, but the car was a spy. (Matt Chinworth for The Washington Post)
I took my Chevy to the levee, but the car was a spy. (Matt Chinworth for The Washington Post)
Cars now run on the new oil: your data. It is fundamental to a future of transportation where vehicles drive themselves and we hop into whatever one is going our way. Data isn’t the enemy. Connected cars already do good things like improve safety and send you service alerts that are much more helpful than a check-engine light in the dash.

But we’ve been down this fraught road before with smart speakers, smart TVs, smartphones and all the other smart things we now realize are playing fast and loose with our personal lives. Once information about our lives gets shared, sold or stolen, we lose control.

A woman’s stalker used an app that allowed him to stop, start and track her car

There are no federal laws regulating what carmakers can collect or do with our driving data. And carmakers lag in taking steps to protect us and draw lines in the sand. Most hide what they’re collecting and sharing behind privacy policies written in the kind of language only a lawyer’s mother could love.

Car data has a secret life. To find out what a car knows about me, I borrowed some techniques from crime scene investigators.

What do you know about your driver, 2017 Chevrolet? We hacked into one of its computers to find out. (Ellie McCutcheon/The Washington Post)
What do you know about your driver, 2017 Chevrolet? We hacked into one of its computers to find out. (Ellie McCutcheon/The Washington Post)
What your car knows
Jim Mason hacks into cars for a living, but usually just to better understand crashes and thefts. The Caltech-trained engineer works in Oakland, Calif., for a firm called ARCCA that helps reconstruct accidents. He agreed to help conduct a forensic analysis of my privacy.

I chose a Chevrolet as our test subject because its maker GM has had the longest of any automaker to figure out data transparency. It began connecting cars with its OnStar service in 1996, initially to summon emergency assistance. Today GM has more than 11 million 4G LTE data-equipped vehicles on the road, including free basic service and extras you pay for. I found a volunteer, Doug, who let us peer inside his two-year-old Chevy Volt.

I met Mason at an empty warehouse, where he began by explaining one important bit of car anatomy. Modern vehicles don’t just have one computer. There are multiple, interconnected brains that can generate up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour from sensors all over the car. Even with Mason’s gear, we could only access some of these systems.

Jim Mason, a forensic engineer with ARCCA, helped us access and download the contents of our car's infotainment computer. (Geoffrey Fowler/The Washington Post)
Jim Mason, a forensic engineer with ARCCA, helped us access and download the contents of our car's infotainment computer. (Geoffrey Fowler/The Washington Post)
This kind of hacking isn’t a security risk for most of us — it requires hours of physical access to a vehicle. Mason brought a laptop, special software, a box of circuit boards, and dozens of sockets and screwdrivers.

We focused on the computer with the most accessible data: the infotainment system. You might think of it as the car’s touch-screen audio controls, yet many systems interact with it, from navigation to a synced-up smartphone. The only problem? This computer is buried beneath the dashboard.

After an hour of prying and unscrewing, our Chevy’s interior looked like it had been lobotomized. But Mason had extracted the infotainment computer, about the size of a small lunchbox. He clipped it into a circuit board, which fed into his laptop. The data didn’t copy over in our first few attempts. “There is a lot of trial and error,” said Mason.

(Don’t try this at home. Seriously — we had to take the car into a repair shop to get the infotainment computer reset.)

Buried behind the touch screen and radio controls sits our Chevrolet's infotainment computer, a box identifiable here by a circle for its fan. (Geoffrey Fowler/The Washington Post)
Buried behind the touch screen and radio controls sits our Chevrolet's infotainment computer, a box identifiable here by a circle for its fan. (Geoffrey Fowler/The Washington Post)
It was worth the trouble when Mason showed me my data. There on a map was the precise location where I’d driven to take apart the Chevy. There were my other destinations, like the hardware store I’d stopped at to buy some tape.

Among the trove of data points were unique identifiers for my and Doug’s phones, and a detailed log of phone calls from the previous week. There was a long list of contacts, right down to people’s address, emails and even photos.

For a broader view, Mason also extracted the data from a Chevrolet infotainment computer that I bought used on eBay for $375. It contained enough data to reconstruct the Upstate New York travels and relationships of a total stranger. We know he or she frequently called someone listed as “Sweetie,” whose photo we also have. We could see the exact Gulf station where they bought gas, the restaurant where they ate (called Taste China) and the unique identifiers for their Samsung Galaxy Note phones.

Infotainment systems can collect even more. Mason has hacked into Fords that record locations once every few minutes, even when you don’t use the navigation system. He’s seen German cars with 300-gigabyte hard drives — five times as much as a basic iPhone 11. The Tesla Model 3 can collect video snippets from the car’s many cameras. Coming next: face data, used to personalize the vehicle and track driver attention.

In our Chevy, we probably glimpsed just a fraction of what GM knows. We didn’t see what was uploaded to GM’s computers, because we couldn’t access the live OnStar cellular connection. (Researchers have done those kinds of hacks before to prove connected vehicles can be remotely controlled.)

My volunteer car owner Doug asked GM to see the data it collected and shared. The automaker just pointed us to an obtuse privacy policy. Doug also (twice) sent GM a formal request under a 2003 California data law to ask who the company shared his information with. He got no reply.

GM spokesman David Caldwell declined to offer specifics on Doug’s Chevy but said the data GM collects generally falls into three categories: vehicle location, vehicle performance and driver behavior. “Much of this data is highly technical, not linkable to individuals and doesn’t leave the vehicle itself,” he said.

The company, he said, collects real-time data to monitor vehicle performance to improve safety and to help design future products and services.

We connected the infotainment computer of our Chevrolet to additional hardware to copy over its contents to a laptop. (Geoffrey Fowler/The Washington Post)
We connected the infotainment computer of our Chevrolet to additional hardware to copy over its contents to a laptop. (Geoffrey Fowler/The Washington Post)
But there were clues to what more GM knows on its website and app. It offers a Smart Driver score — a measure of good driving — based on how hard you brake and turn and how often you drive late at night. They’ll share that with insurance companies, if you want. With paid OnStar service, I could, on demand, locate the car’s exact location. It also offers in-vehicle WiFi and remote key access for Amazon package deliveries. An OnStar Marketplace connects the vehicle directly with third-party apps for Domino’s, IHOP, Shell and others.

The OnStar privacy policy, possibly only ever read by yours truly, grants the company rights to a broad set of personal and driving data without much detail on when and how often it might collect it. It says: “We may keep the information we collect for as long as necessary” to operate, conduct research or satisfy GM’s contractual obligations. Translation: pretty much forever.

It’s likely GM and other automakers keep just a slice of the data cars generate. But think of that as a temporary phenomenon. Coming 5G cellular networks promise to link cars to the Internet with ultra-fast, ultra-high-capacity connections. As wireless connections get cheaper and data becomes more valuable, anything the car knows about you is fair game.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/tech...-car-know-about-you-we-hacked-chevy-find-out/
 

Bolly

Pelican
Or, for now at least, you can just buy an old car. Mason, for one, drives a conspicuously non-connected 1992 Toyota.
Amen to old cars. No bells and whistles telling you to put your seat belt on, do this and do that, child locking door bs and now this. Damn stink wagons.
 
Easy_C said:
Is there any information on how to disable these systems? I can't seem to find anything.
You have to run a diagnostic and determine if there is anything in it that would interfere with the battery if disconnected. Most likely, you would have to remove the entire connection and install an older model radio / audio device if you need one. I'm still using late 200X era tech in my primary vehicle, but mean to get a 90s beat car soon. I would recommend first off not owning any smart products such as (((smart))) phones or (((ipads))) that would sync with the device in the 2020 cars.
The older handheld garmin gps models are crap but should help you if you are trying to go across country and if you are pretty good with navigation once inside major cities and towns.

The paranoid part of me thinks this is all a plot to kill dissidents, every single type of technology out there will be manipulated by globalist thugs and their followers to wipe out those who oppose them, so never trust technology, unless you are savvy enough to fight fire with fire. Oh and I assume if they can't kill you in your globohomovan, they might just commandeer several vehicles around your proximity to cause you to have an accident or death, after all, in chess the pawns go first.

Its better to hide in old-tech, which is often less penetrable than any upgraded means of communication, appliance, or travel, and use new tech as a weapon to strike out with.
 

Leonard D Neubache

Owl
Gold Member
Imagine the Soviets with this kind of technology.
"We reviewed your driving logs and our algorithm determined you breached road laws 3,152 tines in the last 18 months totalling fines of a bit over half a million dollars. We've impounded your vehicle pending auction, put a lien on your house and we'll be garnishing 50 percent of your income until you die."

Conservatives: "Well he shouldn't have derpa derperd the law..."
 

Bolly

Pelican
MusicForThePiano said:
The paranoid part of me thinks this is all a plot to kill dissidents...
No joke, this stuffs probably real. Anyone remember a journalist named Michael Hastings? I can't remember the whole story and the details but he wrote some stuff on military Generals in Afghanistan and wound up seriously dead in a car crash. I guess at the time of the crash he was working on something else to. There was suspicion his car got hacked into and taken over from him. But this is from wiki...

"Former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard A. Clarke said that what is known about the crash is "consistent with a car cyber attack." He was quoted as saying: "There is reason to believe that intelligence agencies for major powers—including the United States—know how to remotely seize control of a car. So if there were a cyber attack on [Hastings'] car — and I'm not saying there was, I think whoever did it would probably get away with it."

"The FBI released a statement denying that Hastings was ever under investigation by the agency.[62] However, FBI had opened a file on Hastings as early as 2012 (see FBI files below). Furthermore, on the day of the crash Hastings visited his neighbor Jordanna Thigpen's apartment after midnight and urgently asked to borrow her Volvo, saying he was afraid to drive his own car. However, Thigpen declined.[14]"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Hastings_(journalist)#Controversy_over_alleged_foul_play



 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
I'm driving 2020 2500hd and posting this right now using its wifi.

If the CIA reads this I don't care. Shouts out to my man Leon Panetta.

I'm happy to give up my privacy for these air-conditioned seats. Get in the truck with a sweaty ass, a few minutes later you bone dry and ready to face the world. Plus, there's some kind of witchcraft going on with the birds-eye-view camera. That thing is amazing.

Aloha!
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Here's another suspicious car death:

McClendon died in a single-occupant, single-vehicle crash at 9:12 a.m. on March 2, 2016. According to police reports, he died instantly when his 2013 Chevrolet Tahoe SUV traveled over the speed limit and crashed into a concrete viaduct under a bridge on Midwest Boulevard in Oklahoma City.

Background
The event occurred the day after McClendon's indictment by a federal grand jury accusing him of violating antitrust laws from 2007 to 2012 while the CEO of Chesapeake Energy. A spokesman for the U.S. Attorney in Oklahoma City disputed initial reports that McClendon was en route to the courthouse when the crash occurred. The spokesman said no arraignments or meetings were scheduled with McClendon on the day of his car accident.[79]

Discussion and Investigation
Oklahoma City Police spokesman Paco Balderrama said of McClendon's actions, "He pretty much drove straight into the wall. The information out there at the scene is that he went left of center, went through a grassy area right before colliding into the embankment. There was plenty of opportunity for him to correct and get back on the roadway, and that didn't occur."[42] On June 9 the medical examiner classified the death as an accident.[80]

...

McClendon was regarded as a very optimistic person by several people who knew him well
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aubrey_McClendon
 

Lika

Kingfisher
This spying big brother technology is freaky but on the other hand, I must admit that in the last three years I avoided to kill a few crazy pedestrians (including a friend) and avoided about ten frontal crashes thanks to the amazing security technology of my car which alerts by sound alarm, red visual alarm in front of me on my screenshield and prepares my car to break before I crash.

It also sends a light beam highlighting potential live crash targets (persons or animals) from two independent projectors, at night.

Amazing stuff...
 

rotekz

Ostrich
Gold Member
Google whistle-blower Dr. Robert Epstein who exposed Google's 2016 and 2018 election interference has announced on Twitter two days ago that his wife has died from injuries sustained in a car accident.





https://www.sandiegouniontribune.co...-seriously-injured-in-i-15-crash-in-escondido

A 29-year-old Vista woman was seriously injured Monday morning when her pickup spun out across a rain-slick Escondido freeway and into the path of an oncoming big rig, authorities said.
It happened around 8:05 a.m. on north Interstate 15 near state Route 78, California Highway Patrol spokesman Officer Mark Latulippe said in a statement.

It was unclear why the woman lost control of her Ford Ranger, but the truck “slid out of control ... and slid across the lanes into the path” of a Freightliner semi hauling two dump trailers, Latulippe said.

The trucker was unable to avoid hitting the Ranger and struck the passenger side of the pickup, Latulippe said. A 19-year-old Santee woman in a Toyota 4Runner was unable to avoid the nearby collision in front of her and struck the Ranger.


TOP GOOGLE WHISTLEBLOWER’S WIFE DIES IN TRAGIC CAR CRASH
Epstein’s unfortunate tragedy comes after he testified before Congress in July about Google’s election meddling using sophisticated algorithms and subversive policies aimed at swaying millions of votes in favor of Democrats.

Notably, Epstein is a Democrat who supported and voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
I recently had a similar issue when purchasing a flat screen tv. Every TV had Alexa or some form of home assistant "spy". It was always listed as "Free". This is part of the adoption push on new technology.

It was for a furnished rental so I just went ahead with the Purchase. But it might be worthwhile to keep those old TVs around too.

An old vehicle which doesn't have all the computer controls and sensors is far better, easier to repair yourself also. So much of this stuff is simple over engineering. Even the Mechanic has to plug the computer in before he can judge the issue himself, and that costs $100.
 

aeroektar

Pelican
I'll never drive one of these death boxes. I said in the gun confiscation thread, if you must own one of these things, locate the networking hardware and be prepared to rip them out.

 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
They've known about IOT threats for a while, but got to admit I hadn't heard of the ransomware through the dashboard trick. It locks up your brakes and won't let you drive away until you pay.

It was just a proof-of-concept exercise and hasn't been witnessed in the wild yet, but it is worth remembering the amount of vectors in all IOT devices, to include cars. So yeah, primitive is better if you want to avoid those problems.
 

Mountaineer

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Cars reached their peak in terms of advancement, usability and purposefulness in the 90's, from then on it's just more bloatware. You absolutely don't need any form of GSM or WiFi in your vehicle! It's a car, drive it! Play on your phone!

Today very few cars are worth buying, they all look like the horrendous Lexus NX, people consider it a good looking car now. :vomit:

Besides, older cars are lighter, more fun to drive and you can work on them yourself. A hot hatchback in the 90's weighted around 900 kg (like this FIAT Punto GT), today it's 1200 kg.



I love how simple and purposeful was the cabin in F40. There is real elegance in that.



Easy_C said:
Is there any information on how to disable these systems? I can't seem to find anything.
Locate and destroy the GSM/4G antenna.
 

dicknixon72

Kingfisher
rotekz said:
A 29-year-old Vista woman was seriously injured Monday morning when her pickup spun out across a rain-slick Escondido freeway and into the path of an oncoming big rig, authorities said.
It happened around 8:05 a.m. on north Interstate 15 near state Route 78, California Highway Patrol spokesman Officer Mark Latulippe said in a statement.

It was unclear why the woman lost control of her Ford Ranger, but the truck “slid out of control ... and slid across the lanes into the path” of a Freightliner semi hauling two dump trailers, Latulippe said.

The trucker was unable to avoid hitting the Ranger and struck the passenger side of the pickup, Latulippe said. A 19-year-old Santee woman in a Toyota 4Runner was unable to avoid the nearby collision in front of her and struck the Ranger.
You're making a lot of assumptions about the Ranger involved. It could've been an older-generation Ranger - which was about as spartan as a new vehicle could've been for 2011 - and even the current generation Ranger doesn't have all these telematics standard.

Also, distance-pacing adaptive/radar cruise has been around since the early-00s and is completely self-contained within the car itself.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
Roosh said:
Here's another suspicious car death:

...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aubrey_McClendon
Reminds me of French Nationalist ex-leader JP Stirbois, and successful Austrian Nationalist leader J. Haider, both killed in violent, mysterious "car accidents".


Haider's car

Plus, reportedly Vladimir Putin himself narrowly escaped death in a freak "car accident", see Leonard's old thread on this: https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-58092-post-1387838.html?highlight=Kutuzovsky#pid1387838

CCTV Video of the car-crash here: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-Russian-president-s-favourite-chauffeur.html
Note how the incoming car is (probably, no other explanation) remotely guided to impact head-on Putin's car.



There also are, from time to time, mysterious and convenient "plane accidents", to get rid of political opponents (alt-Left Dilma terminated a dangerous opponent, who would have taken votes from her, in this way - Eduardo Campos if I remember well). Or, to get rid of people who've "certified" one's birth certificate (or lack of, see the Hawaii small-plane incident)...

In any case, these (probable) political assassinations will now become more numerous and quite easy to implement, what with all these new "smart", connected cars. And it's not just State actors that will be able to pull naughty stuff like this, nowadays: big corporations, or anyone rich enough to hire high-level planners and hackers, might, too.
 
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