New music genre - NewRetroWave

Jacob Robinson

Woodpecker
Catholic
Have been listening to this genre for a few years now. "It was the future that never happened." Well, why didn't it happen? The synth heavy music from the early and mid 80's just seemed to vanish overnight. In 1986 a big hit was the Invisible Touch album by Genesis--very synth heavy. Then within a year or two, that was it, at least for for mainstream music. Guns and Roses broke out in 1987 and Def Leppard owned the charts from late 1987 into 1988 with their Hysteria album--no synthesizers between them. And U2 became popular in that time period among the people who might take themselves too seriously, and no synth there either. Then a few years later it all went grunge. Seemed that to be "authentic" people had to ditch the synth. Sure, there were still bands playing synthesizers out there, but in the 1980's and 1990's good luck finding it if you could only receive top 40 radio stations. The only thing I remember from the late 1980's on touching a synthesizer was seeing Depeche Mode's Enjoy the Silence video once or twice on MTV.

How much of the shift away from synthesizers was truly grass roots, and how much of it was corporate music promoting the Next Big Thing? I liked the guitar heavy music (I think the Smithereens were criminally under-rated in that era), but never saw what was wrong with the synth-heavy bands either. Why not have both?

Maybe it is the genre that corporate music saw no use for, and now that people can make it in their basement and distribute it on their own here it is again. I kind of like it that some of it (like Dynatron and Waveshaper) is without vocals. As I got older, groups I liked in the 90's that had "serious" lyrics--I came to wish they would have just sung about fast cars or some such instead of embarrassing themselves with their sophomoric philosophizing. Any, glad this music is being made.
 

911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member
80s synth is kind of festive, happy, positive, upscale, and not too drug-saddled as far as musical movements go. It got supplanted by heroin-addled grunge rock. It is like someone pulled the plug on the party and send the kids back to their dark attic...




This is a pretty cool soundtrack album from a French TV show with a late 70s retro theme:



Another think about the 80s synth wave, it actually started in the 70s, around 1978, and finished around 1987-88. It started out as a conservative genX backlash against thedecrepit Boomer generation musical establishment that went hippy in the 60s, then disco and prog in the 70s. Young people started getting haircuts, clean shaves and wore jackets and ties to go out.
 

paternos

Robin
Catholic
I was literally last week discovering this genre and saved some pearls. So great to see many loving it too!



This one stood out for me. Magic Fly by Space (1977) and as someone said in the YouTube comments, Daft Punks grandparents.
The clip is also of beauty.

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It is also worth it to listen to the whole LP album.

 
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Mountaineer

Hummingbird
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
It got supplanted by heroin-addled grunge rock. It is like someone pulled the plug on the party and send the kids back to their dark attic...
Question is how much of an engineered movement Grunge was? Was is engineered from the start or taken over once Seattle kooks took notice and figured it could be used. Grunge was much better vehicle for nihilism than synths, that's for sure.
 

911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member

Clean-cut guys from Scotland playing grand inspirational music beneath the Cross and the Sacred Heart - what's not to like?
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Jacob Robinson

Woodpecker
Catholic
...

Another think about the 80s synth wave, it actually started in the 70s, around 1978, and finished around 1987-88. It started out as a conservative genX backlash against thedecrepit Boomer generation musical establishment that went hippy in the 60s, then disco and prog in the 70s. Young people started getting haircuts, clean shaves and wore jackets and ties to go out.

Now that you mention it, I remember a push from corporate music to go back to the 1960's in the late 1980's, maybe culminating in the 20th anniversary of Woodstock in 1989. Roughly when synth-heavy music was pushed out of style. I remember MTV showing clips of a bunch of hippies in mud up to their ankles as though everyone was supposed to just be in awe of how wonderful it was. Supposedly that farm field still stinks on warm days. I can not imagine who in 1989 under the ago of 30 thought there was anything attractive in it. But it was pushed and pushed hard.

Then later, in the Clinton years, the push seemed to be to put a stop to the 1980's by going back to the 1960's. Bell bottom pants made a come back, as an example, when they were an object of ridicule just a few years earlier. In the 1980's people wore clothes that looked new, while in the 1990's people bought new clothing that looked worn out. Pay full price for something already worn out--sums up the '90's. In the 1980's clothing made people look good, while being reasonably modest--in the 1990's clothing made the vast majority of people look ugly and moved towards immodest. Bob Moog only invented the synthesizer half way through the 1960's and it took years for them to catch on, and longer still for such technology to become affordable. So basically any instrument the Beatles did not use was out of style. Is that what grunge was? The Beatles turning it up to 11 and going full nihilist?
 

911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member
Question is how much of an engineered movement Grunge was? Was is engineered from the start or taken over once Seattle kooks took notice and figured it could be used. Grunge was much better vehicle for nihilism than synths, that's for sure.
Now that you mention it, I remember a push from corporate music to go back to the 1960's in the late 1980's, maybe culminating in the 20th anniversary of Woodstock in 1989. Roughly when synth-heavy music was pushed out of style. I remember MTV showing clips of a bunch of hippies in mud up to their ankles as though everyone was supposed to just be in awe of how wonderful it was. Supposedly that farm field still stinks on warm days. I can not imagine who in 1989 under the ago of 30 thought there was anything attractive in it. But it was pushed and pushed hard.

Then later, in the Clinton years, the push seemed to be to put a stop to the 1980's by going back to the 1960's. Bell bottom pants made a come back, as an example, when they were an object of ridicule just a few years earlier. In the 1980's people wore clothes that looked new, while in the 1990's people bought new clothing that looked worn out. Pay full price for something already worn out--sums up the '90's. In the 1980's clothing made people look good, while being reasonably modest--in the 1990's clothing made the vast majority of people look ugly and moved towards immodest. Bob Moog only invented the synthesizer half way through the 1960's and it took years for them to catch on, and longer still for such technology to become affordable. So basically any instrument the Beatles did not use was out of style. Is that what grunge was? The Beatles turning it up to 11 and going full nihilist?

Not sure how engineered the grunge scene was, but there seems to be a definite push. The 1980s were a time of high economic growth and optimism about the future. Technology was surging, but it was still on our side so to speak, PCs were just a very useful tool that helped you type and store documents, crunch numbers but did not intrude much into your social and private lives, and the globalist grid which was already being set up hadn't hit hard yet.

The 1990s was the decade that saw some acceleration in globalism, with NAFTA being implemented. This is when you had an acceleration of immigration in the US fueled by Mexican farmers going out of business due to NAFTA. Even places like Fresno or LA were still majority Heritage Americans in the 1980s, and Orange County was a staunch white conservative stronghold. The Midwest was starting to be gutted with the acceleration of outsourcing.

At the same time, you had the first generation of Boomer offspring coming of age. The parents of kids from the 80s had not grown up in the hippie and disco era, they were already in their 20s when those mass cultures hit. Not the case for the youth in the 90s, so you had the first generation which has grown with more familial turbulence, and the Cobain archetype of the disturbed white suburban kid, although still not prevalent, was present.

In the early 90s as well Afghanistan was in civil war chaos and the opium flowed freely from there into the US, until the Taliban came to power in 1996 and stopped it. Every mass music movement had a drug that went with it, and to some degree the music encouraged its use. The 1960s pushed pot and LSD, disco had cocaine, rap had crack and for grunge it was heroin, drug of despair.

Kurt Cobain's wife Courtney is from a deep state family, her father managed the Grateful Dead, which was a deep state operation that distributed tens of millions of LSD doses to their following. He was a talented but disturbed young man who was manipulated by his wife, her father claims she killed him.

Besides grunge, the music that emerged in the 90s was fairly satanic in nature, with acts like the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nine Inch Nails and genres like death metal. "Alternative", which was the label they went under, was mostly dark in nature and the contrary of the more uplifting music from the 80s. It was also not really alternative, being a highly corporate genre pushed by the music industry. This is when also the crack epidemic appeared alongside gangster rap, another genre heavily promoted by the music industry, whose kingpins like Lyor Cohen pictured below were also invested in the private prison complex, one of the most openly cynical manifestation of popular music weaponization.

 
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