New trend: Women are making devil horns with their hair

Jive Turkey

Woodpecker
Other Christian
What I hate is that those Feminists also don Christian skin. They claim to be "Saved" or "Born Again" but they are hyper-feminist.

If a woman "Becomes Christian" and actually becomes more feminist. Then they are actually converting to a faux Christianity with another Jesus. A false salvation and true damnation.
I haven't been dating as a Christian for very long so I haven't really experienced this too much, but it doesn't surprise me. More what I have run into is women who enjoy the Christian label but then openly admit they just pick and choose what doctrines to believe based on how they feel.
 

infowarrior1

Crow
Protestant
I haven't been dating as a Christian for very long so I haven't really experienced this too much, but it doesn't surprise me. More what I have run into is women who enjoy the Christian label but then openly admit they just pick and choose what doctrines to believe based on how they feel.

Or even worse ignore and reinterpret Church Tradition to always be feminist. I mean its not that hard to find such things on the web.

Just like they did with interpretation like the Satanically inspired NIV 2011:
In the marketing of the TNIV, the IBS sought to minimize controversy by claiming that the revision was not really motivated by a desire to avoid offending modern sensibilities, or by any attitude contrary to “patriarchalism.” It was claimed that their purpose was nothing other than to make the meaning of the text clear.
 

darknavigator

Robin
Catholic

Satanic Feminism: Lucifer as the Liberator of Woman in Nineteenth-Century Culture​

ABSTRACT​

According to the Bible, Eve was the first to heed Satan’s advice to eat of the forbidden fruit. The notion of woman as the Devil’s accomplice is prominent throughout the history of Christianity and has been used to legitimate the subordination of wives and daughters. During the nineteenth century, rebellious females performed counter-readings of this misogynist tradition. Hereby, Lucifer was reconceptualized as a feminist liberator of womankind, and Eve became a heroine. In these reimagining's, Satan is an ally in the struggle against a patriarchy supported by God the Father and his male priests. The book delineates how such Satanic feminism is expressed in a number of nineteenth-century esoteric works, literary texts, autobiographies, pamphlets and journals, newspaper articles, paintings, sculptures, and even artefacts of consumer culture such as jewellery. The analysis focuses on interfaces between esotericism, literature, art, and the political realm. New light is thus shed on neglected aspects of the intellectual history of feminism, Satanism, and revisionary mythmaking. The scope of the study makes it valuable not only for historians of religion but also for those with a general interest in cultural history (or specific aspects of it like gender history, romanticism, or decadent-symbolist art and literature).

 
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