Nostalgia for the 80s and 90s

Brazilianguy

Woodpecker
I´ll be the first to admit I´m a nostalgic bastard.
I rarely watch current TV series or films (only the ones that really catch my eye) and instead stick to stuff from the 80s and 90s, including music and literature.

You could say this is due to my being born in the 80s and that I´m simply trying to recapture the freshness of my youth, and I would agree, although I don´t think it´s just that.
When I watch those old films I can see the 80s (and to a lesser extent, the 90s) were a more innocent time. People had high hopes for the future, moral values were stronger, Christianity was present and the family unit was a given. Plus, there was no political correctness.
Life also seemed a lot simpler and more fun and there was a lot more real social interaction because of the absence of the internet, social media and smartphones, and people were more genuine.
Technology at the time really connected people instead of isolating everyone like nowadays.
Arcade games were all the rage, and that´s where kids and teens would hang out and make friends.
I still play them to this day, and they seem way cooler than current games.

I also remember there was this sense of magic and adventure, and that you could go on a night out, meet complete strangers, perhaps even the love of your life and that anything could happen!
A trip to another city or country would be something completely out of the ordinary and people would be curious to meet someone different.

When I compare the 80s and 90s to today, it seems like a real drag.
Yep, technology made a lot of things easier, but life seems so boring and predictable nowadays.
People are closed off, less interesting, less authentic and less intelligent.
The sense of adventure and spontaneity in life has all but disappeared.
It seems the only thing people care about nowadays is money, money, money and materialistic pursuits like fame.

Do you guys feel the same or am I just an old fart?
 

questor70

Ostrich
I think the above goes without saying. The 80s weren't exactly Leave it to Beaver, but it might seem that way compared to today's sensibilities.

It's more useful to understand why things are different than to merely bemoan the change. The dot com era of the late 90s was really the last great period of optimism in the US. Then we suffered the dot com crash, 911, Afghanistan, Gulf War 2, and then the recession of 2008. I really think the spirit of america was broken by all these things such that even though the economy recovered, we'll never get back to where we were back in 1999. The way people act and behave today is a function of them lacking any purpose in life, not at an individual or a group level. And so all anyone really has left is to amuse themselves to death in various ways, most of them ultimately self-destructive.
 

Kurgan

Kingfisher
You're not alone in that. I was born in the 80's too and I try to watch the films and TV I never got to watch from the 80's and 90's. You should consider looking into the Arcade 1UP arcade machines, arcades are dead here in America but are alive in other countries.

I don't think there was as much propaganda back then and it wasn't shoved down your throat like today.

Social media has connected people and groups together but it's also isolated them at the same time.
 

Syberpunk

Pelican
Gold Member
I miss when a family size of four was an average, meant that visiting a neighbours house meant you got to get the hijinks and dynamic interplay of four teenagers, usually two you went to school, a younger sister by a year or two beneath you, and with an older brother or sister that seemed cool as hell and who was near college age.

I loved the camaraderie.

We once spent 10 hours playing texas hold em poker because we didn't set blinds at the beginning.
Being in kinks of laughter as by sadistically hilarious older brother of friend with a pellet gun
Your friends sister actually drawing all 151 pokemon and you being damn impressed.
Reading JRPG's to your younger brother around a 19 inch crt tv when they had no voice acting.
Not being able to look a game cutscenes up on youtube, so you would make save files before the best moments and everybody would have to be there as you played.
 

JiggyLordJr

Kingfisher
I feel this 100%. The magic of the 90s in which I grew up has all but disappeared. I remember back when we solved puzzles for fun, played board games to pass the time, and marveled at the new, non-invasive electronics that were released. Having a Game Boy was a big deal back then, imagine that.

I think the biggest change was universal connectedness. Before the proliferation of the cell phone, people were more or less anonymous. Unless you were a mega celeb (like Tom Cruise), chances were that the only people who knew of your existence were those you came in contact with. If you liked someone, you vowed to hang out again. If not, you would both fade away into anonymity. In other words,people had privacy. The only way to be reached was by landline or by post. If you were away from either medium, you were free. You could fuck off to wherever and nobody would know. You could come back, and spend time doing whatever you liked. I think most of us miss the 80a 90s because this level of freedom no longer exists in the present day.

CCTVs are everywhere. If you say something wrong, you might get doxxed by a stranger. If you do something wrong, someone might record it on their smartphones and upload to the internet. Kids don't even play on the street anymore, as they're all inside captivated by carefully engineered screens. Everyone's aware of this constant publivity, and put on their masks accordingly. That sense of spontaneity and carefree-ness has been replaced by constant self-awareness to make sure one saves face. We're too connected, the thrill is gone, and I'm not sure it's coming back.
 

Syberpunk

Pelican
Gold Member
You know what I miss? natural neutral colours in films and tv series that reflected reality. That dare I say had....beige and looked flat and weren't saturated to hell. When popular films (non arthouse films) took their time to build a atmosphere and feeling, where the edits weren't ran through a data analysis supercomputer to see just how little information the audience needed before cutting.


Good comment in the video:

This movie is very 90's in its tone.While the events portrayed took place in 1970 the movie itself is infused with that 90's style optimism. You can sort of see it. You can tell the movie is about the 90's and the general optimistic outlook at the time even while tackling something that took place decades before. No way would such a movie be as optimistic today.

Look at First Man in comparison.
 

Douglas Quaid

Kingfisher
In one of the opening helicopter scenes in Predator, Jesse Ventura calls the rest of the crew a bunch of slack jawed faggots for not wanting any chewing tobacco. It's hilarious. Imagine how triggered people would get today if they saw that.

Heartbreak Ridge would be another highly triggering movie. Clint Eastwood is amazing.
 
Nostalgia is sad in a way as well. Even the lefties and SJWs are nostalgic for the 90s and 80s. Some never lived through them and yet they see it as delightfully retro.

The reason for this is because the current time and future outlook is nihilistic and aside from the never manifesting multicultural trannie utopia not much truly fascinates them.
 

BlueMark

Woodpecker
Gold Member
I miss when computer software and systems were simpler in the 90s. And there was a sense that things were going to get better. Looking back, the "progress" in tech seems mostly illusory when you look beneath the shiny surface of the iDevice swarm.

Computing power and storage capacity have increased by orders of magnitude relative to cost since the 80s and 90s. But we aren't doing that much more with software when it comes to productivity.
- The productivity of the average user hasn't been greatly multiplied by the greater computing power, nor has it translated to more free time or money.
- Websites aren't faster than in the 90s -- they just contain orders of magnitude of more junk -- google "website obesity".
- Today the software is more complex and we can do more, but the trend has been to turn everyone into a content consumer using a smartphone or tablet.

But good luck explaining that skepticism to the Silicon Valley crowd.
 
BlueMark said:
I miss when computer software and systems were simpler in the 90s. And there was a sense that things were going to get better. Looking back, the "progress" in tech seems mostly illusory when you look beneath the shiny surface of the iDevice swarm.

Computing power and storage capacity have increased by orders of magnitude relative to cost since the 80s and 90s. But we aren't doing that much more with software when it comes to productivity.
- The productivity of the average user hasn't been greatly multiplied by the greater computing power, nor has it translated to more free time or money.
- Websites aren't faster than in the 90s -- they just contain orders of magnitude of more junk -- google "website obesity".
- Today the software is more complex and we can do more, but the trend has been to turn everyone into a content consumer using a smartphone or tablet.

But good luck explaining that skepticism to the Silicon Valley crowd.

The 80s and 90s in IT still felt pioneering. To wrest some truly new and innovative from the barely capable hardware felt like an accomplishment. For example implementing a modem in software, then using a off-the-shelf sound card to transmit data over amateur radio used to made jaws drop.

Nowadays with supercomputers in your pocket burning their computational power in dozens of API layers, doing anything with it feels like a boring grind.
 

Captainstabbin

Hummingbird
Apparently, there's a retro gaming convention. At this con, there was a talk given about telephone phreaking. Fascinating! People used to pay $.25-$1 a MINUTE for long distance calls - and those calls might have been fewer than 20 miles. No wonder people used to write letters.

If you remember old tech or just like learning about how primitive computers worked, this guy's channel is worth a sub.

 

Eusebius

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I'm really glad to have been a geeky kid and teenager in the 80s. I experienced a lot of cool tech from the Apple IIe and Pacman at the arcade, to getting primitive dial-up modems (a la War Games) at home, well before the Web existed. Writing programs in BASIC. In fact, typing in full BASIC programs from magazines, line by line.
The music and movies were the best. The cool thing is, it's all still accessible anytime you want a nostalgia fix.
 
No nostalgia for the decades in my formative years spent confirming biases. Shitty consumer mall culture not withstanding and this clip from a tween lad's much anticipated Saturday afternoon matinee left an emotional scar felt to this day.

 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
Kingsley Davis said:
No nostalgia for the decades in my formative years spent confirming biases. Shitty consumer mall culture not withstanding and this clip from a tween lad's much anticipated Saturday afternoon matinee left an emotional scar felt to this day.


Haha, my siblings and I saw this in the theatre. No other cartoon has had the same balls as these movie makers. All of your favorite good guys getting outright killed in the first 10 minutes. Then that battle between optimus prime and megatron, I will stand by that there has never been a greater fight in cinematic history. They even did the parallel respect of good vs. evil with everyone crying around a dying optimus prime's hospital bed vs. the decepticons just kicking megatron out of the back of the shuttle in mid space.

Imagine if Spielberg, towards the end of goonies had the fratellies suddenly kill a bunch of the kids and then had Sloth and Mama fratelli mortally wound each other in combat while Sloth saved the rest. Cut to the fratelli's throwing a mortally wounded mama from an escaping train and the goonies surrounding sloth's hospital bed while he dies.

Thats what transformers the movie was. No writers have had balls that big since.
 

catoblepa

Woodpecker
JiggyLordJr said:
I feel this 100%. The magic of the 90s in which I grew up has all but disappeared. I remember back when we solved puzzles for fun, played board games to pass the time, and marveled at the new, non-invasive electronics that were released. Having a Game Boy was a big deal back then, imagine that.

I think the biggest change was universal connectedness. Before the proliferation of the cell phone, people were more or less anonymous. Unless you were a mega celeb (like Tom Cruise), chances were that the only people who knew of your existence were those you came in contact with. If you liked someone, you vowed to hang out again. If not, you would both fade away into anonymity. In other words,people had privacy. The only way to be reached was by landline or by post. If you were away from either medium, you were free. You could fuck off to wherever and nobody would know. You could come back, and spend time doing whatever you liked. I think most of us miss the 80a 90s because this level of freedom no longer exists in the present day.

CCTVs are everywhere. If you say something wrong, you might get doxxed by a stranger. If you do something wrong, someone might record it on their smartphones and upload to the internet. Kids don't even play on the street anymore, as they're all inside captivated by carefully engineered screens. Everyone's aware of this constant publivity, and put on their masks accordingly. That sense of spontaneity and carefree-ness has been replaced by constant self-awareness to make sure one saves face. We're too connected, the thrill is gone, and I'm not sure it's coming back.

In the 80s cyborgs from the future had to go through the phone book before tracking you down and killing you. Now they just need to do a quick search on any social media.
 
Dr. Howard said:
Kingsley Davis said:
No nostalgia for the decades in my formative years spent confirming biases. Shitty consumer mall culture not withstanding and this clip from a tween lad's much anticipated Saturday afternoon matinee left an emotional scar felt to this day.


Haha, my siblings and I saw this in the theatre. No other cartoon has had the same balls as these movie makers. All of your favorite good guys getting outright killed in the first 10 minutes. Then that battle between optimus prime and megatron, I will stand by that there has never been a greater fight in cinematic history. They even did the parallel respect of good vs. evil with everyone crying around a dying optimus prime's hospital bed vs. the decepticons just kicking megatron out of the back of the shuttle in mid space.

Imagine if Spielberg, towards the end of goonies had the fratellies suddenly kill a bunch of the kids and then had Sloth and Mama fratelli mortally wound each other in combat while Sloth saved the rest. Cut to the fratelli's throwing a mortally wounded mama from an escaping train and the goonies surrounding sloth's hospital bed while he dies.

Thats what transformers the movie was. No writers have had balls that big since.

Yeah, I caught on quick though that Hasbro did this to make way for a whole line of head masters, triple changers, shit changers line of toys.

 

Salinger

Woodpecker
I miss the Infocom text games where your mind supplied the graphics. The creators didn't make it easy for you to win either. Puzzles and riddles would keep you up for days. No way to go online and find a solution like you can with today's games. You don't solve the puzzle yourself and you didn't finish the game.





Infidel was my favorite and one of the only ones I managed to finish. It had you playing the part of Indiana Jones as you searched for lost treasure in the desert.

 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
Everyone wants to get on with their own lives without feeling guilty about it.

With so much less information in the 80's, that was the norm. People might pick a charity or two they donated to because of a commercial they saw on TV. Otherwise, you had very little idea what was going on in the rest of the world.

Unless you went out of your way and went to a real lot of trouble to find out, knowing what was going on in the world meant watching the news, because you trusted the news channels.

Nowadays everyone, even the young, has endless information, often false, streaming in at all times, and if you don't feel guilty of your own accord, there are SJW activists to make you feel bad about your race, gender, sexual orientation, how you sit on a bus, how you explain things, the whole mess.

That is why every show you watch, every news story you hear, every novel you read seems to have social justice woven into it somehow.

People today are no different from people in the 80's; they just want to get on with their own lives without feeling guilty about it, only now that is impossible.

The uneasy current compromise seems to be, I will get on with my own life, interrupting it periodically to proclaim that I care about social justice, then get back on with it.

So, the guilt never ends. There is no separation between personal life and political life. There is a constant drumbeat in the back of people's minds that somehow they are doing something wrong, or aren't doing enough of something that they should be doing.

Life is a big undifferentiated mess of personal impulses broken up by superficial paens to the under-served. It is never this or that. It is always kind of this while being kind of that.

It wasn't like that in the 80's. If you wanted to volunteer at a homeless shelter or old folks home, you did it for the hours you did it, and the rest of your time was your own.

Now, there are too many problems that are too big to be solved, and there are too many things to feel guilty about and so people are walking on thin ice all the time, even if they don't really care, because they are worried about losing their job or losing friends because they made the wrong joke about the wrong dyke.

That is what everyone's nostalgia should be for, that bygone innocence, the day when you listened to a song, maybe sang along, that was all you were doing, not monitoring the lyrics to make sure they weren't offensive.

I was a teen in the 70's and in my 20's in the 80's. What I miss is the bliss of ignorance.

I miss the joy of eating a really good handful of grapes on a warm summer's day, with no thought of where they were sourced or what oppression was enacted in the picking of said fruit.

Saying ignorance is bliss is normally an insult, as if the ignorant person willfully hiding from the world and failing to take on their normal responsibilities.

The flipside is that having a lot of knowledge of messed up stuff that you can't do anything about is just as bad. Nothing gets fixed and all you can do is fail to enjoy the good things in life because there is an undercurrent of guilt faintly drumming in your psyche at all times.

Lately I have been listening to reaction videos by a Youtube channel called "Lost in Vegas," and you have a couple of hip, young, musically savvy guys listening and reacting to music. One of the funniest things is how fired up they get, how enthusiastic, when they listen to a few songs by bands I listened to in high school.

I get fired up right along with them, because I feel the same spirit they do, the pure joy in the music, feeling good in the music, music that is only concerned with the pure pleasure of writing and playing good music.

I realize that I completely took that music for granted when I was young, playing as it was in the background on the radio, and my own nostalgia, youthful enthusiasm and hopefulness, and pure joy at being alive is being reawakened by hearing all these old classics through new ears, and ears that are more musically sophisticated than my own.

It's just a feeling, maybe more than a feeling, heh, of pure uncluttered joy to be alive that is no longer possible for anyone, young or old, because we are weighed down with too much information about the world all the time, and revisiting these old songs and movies remind us of simpler more basic human pleasures that are much harder to access anymore.

I lived through those times and never knew what I had, wished I had paid more attention then, when it was happening, and the best I can do now is, every now and then, not all the time, certainly, listen along to these old songs with the Lost in Vegas guys and feel the same feelings for a few minutes, the same innocent enthusiasm and joy for life of the young spirit that lives in all of us.

Then it's back to the internet with everyone else.

A few choice LiV videos first though:

This is a good one. I had almost forgot that you could take your time in a song, and play with tempos, and set up a story with a long intro and then tell the story and kill it on the way out. Just feel good music.


This one is a good breakdown of what makes a song a masterpiece.


Have to include this one because I heard all the songs on this album so many times that I couldn't even hear it anymore, it was like elevator music. These two dudes really savored and appreciated it, without even knowing the band or who Stevie Nicks was. They are such sensitive listeners that afterwards they basically described her and her life just from listening to this song.

 

questor70

Ostrich
Let's be honest. What makes those music reaction videos popular is the novelty that black guys are taking the time to discover and appreciate 'white' music with an open-mind. It's not that they were never exposed to it because of their age as much as it's not what they're expected to listen to. This is especially novel because all pop music these days is somewhere on the R&B and hip-hop spectrum, regardless of whether they're white or black performers. Outside of memes and Glee episodes, that "white" music is dying out fast.
 
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