Nostalgia for the 80s and 90s

MajorStyles

Pelican
The 80s was the last generation where a certain amount of fun was allowed to permeate the arts: i.e. glam rock, professional wrestling, Katrina and the Waves, Kool and the Gang, etc. Then the 90s hit, and it was nihilistic grunge rock and gangster rap. It was as if "somebody" got threatened by all that good-natured fun and decided to re-route the culture into a dark and hopeless abyss.

When the new millennium rolled forth, we had 9/11, which casted an even darker cloud over everything and led to more dark clouds: i.e. Iraq, the economic crash of 2008, etc. The arts were reflective of this by and large, with almost nothing of substance arising out of that.

Now the arts are basically dead. We have SJW superhero movies, Post Malone, and no more comedy. Again, it’s as if somebody does not want anything of value to arise in the arts, since it could lead to people having an appreciation of beauty and, subsequently, a revolt against the degenerate art expressions.
 

Salinger

Woodpecker
questor70 said:
Let's be honest. What makes those music reaction videos popular is the novelty that black guys are taking the time to discover and appreciate 'white' music with an open-mind. It's not that they were never exposed to it because of their age as much as it's not what they're expected to listen to. This is especially novel because all pop music these days is somewhere on the R&B and hip-hop spectrum, regardless of whether they're white or black performers.

Yeah, these music reaction channels work best when the reviewers are black or Millenials who haven't been exposed to classic rock before.
 
If you want to go into nostalgia then all you need to do is watch Spielberg movies from the 1980s:


They depict the spirit of the 80s better than anything else. Even Back to the Future has the same positive upbeat pro-Western mindset with a Spielberg at his prime - before his Yoko Ono wife convinced the guy that he should make more "artistic" movies. (It's true - Spielberg was hated at Hollywood and by critics because he was better than all of them combined in the 1980s.)

When you see movies like the Goonies or Back to the Future you find out what is truly lost and how things have changed. When you watch them in 25 years you will find only sadness for a lost time and empire.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
Dr. Howard said:
Kingsley Davis said:
No nostalgia for the decades in my formative years spent confirming biases. Shitty consumer mall culture not withstanding and this clip from a tween lad's much anticipated Saturday afternoon matinee left an emotional scar felt to this day.


Haha, my siblings and I saw this in the theatre. No other cartoon has had the same balls as these movie makers. All of your favorite good guys getting outright killed in the first 10 minutes. Then that battle between optimus prime and megatron, I will stand by that there has never been a greater fight in cinematic history. They even did the parallel respect of good vs. evil with everyone crying around a dying optimus prime's hospital bed vs. the decepticons just kicking megatron out of the back of the shuttle in mid space.

I well remember seeing that in the theatre myself. I doubt there've been as many tears from a cinemaful of 11 year old boys since Old Yeller's final minutes in 1957.

And let's remember, there was a cynical motivation behind it: Hasbro was phasing out all the old toys and wanted people to buy all the new ones they were bringing out - Ultra Magnus, Rodimus Prime, etc, etc, etc. Hence why Megatron got a new lease on life as Galvatron and Optimus Prime got flat out murdered in favour of an inferior Prime in every way.

And yet it's still a better-handled cynical phaseout than something like the The Last Jedi was. Reason being? They let Optimus Prime be a fricking hero, the paragon of all heroes, going out heroically with a sacrifice of himself, acting according to his character. They didn't turn him into a green-tit-milk-drinking old man and then have him try and convince Hot Rod that the Autobots were destined to fail from the beginning. And they also didn't turn Arcee into an Autobot who could take on Trypticon by herself, either.
 

rpg

Ostrich
MajorStyles said:
The 80s was the last generation where a certain amount of fun was allowed to permeate the arts: i.e. glam rock, professional wrestling, Katrina and the Waves, Kool and the Gang, etc. Then the 90s hit, and it was nihilistic grunge rock and gangster rap. It was as if "somebody" got threatened by all that good-natured fun and decided to re-route the culture into a dark and hopeless abyss.

When the new millennium rolled forth, we had 9/11, which casted an even darker cloud over everything and led to more dark clouds: i.e. Iraq, the economic crash of 2008, etc. The arts were reflective of this by and large, with almost nothing of substance arising out of that.

Now the arts are basically dead. We have SJW superhero movies, Post Malone, and no more comedy. Again, it’s as if somebody does not want anything of value to arise in the arts, since it could lead to people having an appreciation of beauty and, subsequently, a revolt against the degenerate art expressions.

And who spear headed this destruction? Rock was killed it didnt die on its own. Grunge was foisted upon Gen X and it sucked. I never like Cobain, and the bands that followed.
I beliieve the powers that be thought they were big enough they could dictate what we would like. It worked in part.
 

RIslander

Hummingbird
The Terminator. This in my opinion is the greatest film of the 80's. Original script, great casting, lack of CGI, classic 80's soundtrack and most of all the pacing of the film. Consider the fact it was done on a 6 million dollar budget; Terminator 2, while still a decent flick, doesn't hold a candle to the original and cost over 100 million.

 

Syberpunk

Pelican
Gold Member
RIslander said:
The Terminator. This in my opinion is the greatest film of the 80's. Original script, great casting, lack of CGI, classic 80's soundtrack and most of all the pacing of the film. Consider the fact it was done on a 6 million dollar budget; Terminator 2, while still a decent flick, doesn't hold a candle to the original and cost over 100 million.


Go to 46:50, Brad Fiedel talks about creators usually BSing with a supposed vision before showing a composer a film they will write music for, he talks about the first time watching the film with Cameron and it dawns on him "The vision is actually here, I can't believe it". I prefer the hard synths and hard boiled horror mood of the original too, the casting, the cops and everything else as well, infinitely rewatchable. My favourite film of all time.

 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member

It's been hitting me hard as of late as well. I look around at all these zombies glued to their phones and sometimes when I try to converse with strangers half of them look like they are in general pain trying to have a conversation in real life.... well the list of why I don't like modern times can be summed up with a quick stroll through the clown world thread. Aside from the obvious which is when everyone grows older they look back fondly on their youth with rose tinted glasses cause regardless of the era, your carefree youth and those feelings of invincibility is something you can never get back. Sadly for me and I assume many people that age... I had no idea how magical that time was and couldn't wait to "grow up" (still working on that last part) No matter how many older people gave me the best advice they could, I never listened cause I thought I had it all figured out.
On to the era of the 80s and 90s..........in my opinion it was prime time and I'm super grateful to have been a kid and a teen during those years. A lot of what made those decades so great has been covered in here. The timing of this thread is pretty relevant as I pretty much only watch 80s movies anymore. I do listen to newer music though but... its New Retro Waveso its 80s music made today. The combination of the awesomeness of the 80s/90s and my lost youth really hit me hard in my "I wanna go back" feels


The thread down memory lane:
The 80s Thread

 

MajorStyles

Pelican
rpg said:
MajorStyles said:
The 80s was the last generation where a certain amount of fun was allowed to permeate the arts: i.e. glam rock, professional wrestling, Katrina and the Waves, Kool and the Gang, etc. Then the 90s hit, and it was nihilistic grunge rock and gangster rap. It was as if "somebody" got threatened by all that good-natured fun and decided to re-route the culture into a dark and hopeless abyss.

When the new millennium rolled forth, we had 9/11, which casted an even darker cloud over everything and led to more dark clouds: i.e. Iraq, the economic crash of 2008, etc. The arts were reflective of this by and large, with almost nothing of substance arising out of that.

Now the arts are basically dead. We have SJW superhero movies, Post Malone, and no more comedy. Again, it’s as if somebody does not want anything of value to arise in the arts, since it could lead to people having an appreciation of beauty and, subsequently, a revolt against the degenerate art expressions.

And who spear headed this destruction? Rock was killed it didnt die on its own. Grunge was foisted upon Gen X and it sucked. I never like Cobain, and the bands that followed.
I beliieve the powers that be thought they were big enough they could dictate what we would like. It worked in part.

The usual suspects...

As far as grunge goes, I agree with your assessment. Despite any musical proficiency it may have displayed, it was riddled with hopelessness. It's no surprise that the major stars from that genre have "checked out" early, buried under the weight of their existential despair: i.e. Cobain, Cornell, Weiland, etc.

"The more you suffer, the more it shows you really care" (The Offspring). Yes, keep repeating that line over and over until you're on anti-depressants, your personal life is in shambles, and you're ready to eat a bullet. Some people (even musicians) will claim, "Yes, but I never really listen to the lyrics." Everytime somebody says that, I hear Satan giggling in the background.

Music is such a powerful art form. The elites realize that they must watch it carefully and not let anything beautiful emerge. Otherwise, the audience might believe that life can be beautiful as well. The recognition of this reality is a threat to people that suffer despite their extereme wealth.
 
MajorStyles said:
rpg said:
And who spear headed this destruction? Rock was killed it didnt die on its own. Grunge was foisted upon Gen X and it sucked. I never like Cobain, and the bands that followed.
I beliieve the powers that be thought they were big enough they could dictate what we would like. It worked in part.

The usual suspects...

As far as grunge goes, I agree with your assessment. Despite any musical proficiency it may have displayed, it was riddled with hopelessness. It's no surprise that the major stars from that genre have "checked out" early, buried under the weight of their existential despair: i.e. Cobain, Cornell, Weiland, etc.

"The more you suffer, the more it shows you really care" (The Offspring). Yes, keep repeating that line over and over until you're on anti-depressants, your personal life is in shambles, and you're ready to eat a bullet. Some people (even musicians) will claim, "Yes, but I never really listen to the lyrics." Everytime somebody says that, I hear Satan giggling in the background.

Music is such a powerful art form. The elites realize that they must watch it carefully and not let anything beautiful emerge. Otherwise, the audience might believe that life can be beautiful as well. The recognition of this reality is a threat to people that suffer despite their extereme wealth.

I'm now far enough with my guitar endeavor started in June that I'm able to sing adoration songs while accompanying myself - with the latter helping with me the singing, which I'm not very good at as well.

So while I'm strumming along my voice trying the hardest to hit the right pitch, singing verses praising the Lord and how much I love Him, I suddenly get shivers. I sing the refrain again and I get shivers again. Then I realize: He loves me doing this, it's not just about practicing guitar.

It is as if music has some very spiritual function, especially when making it yourself. And Satan knows that...
 

questor70

Ostrich
MajorStyles said:
It's no surprise that the major stars from that genre have "checked out" early, buried under the weight of their existential despair: i.e. Cobain, Cornell, Weiland, etc.

Include Layne Staley in that list. I used to be seriously into Alice in Chains but it's really dark music and it leads me to dark places. But then again, so does a lot of heralded music, like Pink Floyd. Dark Music isn't inherently bad and a lot of positive music isn't necessarily good.

The term "teen angst" exists for a reason. Kids lose their childhood innocence and realize the cruelty of the real world and it's a shock to the system. What you don't get out of teen angst creeps up again on you later (which is a lot of what the Clown World thread is about, frankly).

What also is forgotten is that Grunge was a response to two factors, which was reacting against the cartoonishness of the hair-band era and the recession of the early 90s. The dot com boom pulled us out of the recession pretty quickly but it hit at a time my generation had just finished school and entered into the workforce. This is why GenX was called the slacker generation at the time. It seemed like there was no place for us at first, and before we were called slackers we were called the invisible generation because the boomers stole the limelight and there weren't nearly as many of us as previous generations so it seemed like we just sort of subsisted on boomer leftovers.

In retrospect, first world problems? Sure. But you can't expect kids to have a full perspective on the human experience.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I graduated in 1997 so our class was mostly born in 1979. When that song came out in high school, we instantly gravitated towards it. I was rolling in my 1973 Charger SE, my two best friends had a 1969 Camaro and a 1968 Javelin. We loaded the cars up on Friday and Saturdays and drove around from party to party. Mix tapes and CD's, sex lights and warm summer breezes as we rolled out to a bush party - or if it worked out, a house party. Always music. Over and again.

That was our Grad song. We were living in that moment and thought that song was about us and that's it. Now I understand the words. Its about nostalgia. How can a song make me smell the spring grass and the last of the rotting snow? Time.
 
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