NYC is Dead Forever


What the "New York Strong" articles don't understand is that there's two classes of disasters. The first drives people away. The other keeps people away. The Germ will fade eventually, one way or another. Thats true. But capitulating to black marxist terrorism will keep the place barren. The 1970s Charles Bronson version of NYC was just downwind from the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Nobody ever points that out.

Its sort of like the auto industry in Detroit. The collapse of American car-making was an independent event of the rapidly changing demographics of the town (though you can easily argue it wasn't). The motor city still hasn't rose again. Maybe it doesn't have the pixie dust that NYC has.
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker

What the "New York Strong" articles don't understand is that there's two classes of disasters. The first drives people away. The other keeps people away. The Germ will fade eventually, one way or another. Thats true. But capitulating to black marxist terrorism will keep the place barren. The 1970s Charles Bronson version of NYC was just downwind from the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Nobody ever points that out.

Its sort of like the auto industry in Detroit. The collapse of American car-making was an independent event of the rapidly changing demographics of the town (though you can easily argue it wasn't). The motor city still hasn't rose again. Maybe it doesn't have the pixie dust that NYC has.

Detroit hasn't had "changing demographics". Detroit has had population loss.
Different problem. Detroit has always been black since the reconstruction. There aren't a bunch of black people that suddenly moved into the city lol. In fact, now there's black flight from Detroit into the suburbs and out of Michigan entirely in a lot of cases.

The collapse of Auto manufacturing in Detroit was a contributing factor of the population loss and destabilization of the Detroit metro area.
Before the California great out migration there was the Michigan great out migration. Those of us from Michigan know this. This is why you find a ton of Detroiters in Nashville, TN, Tampa, FL, NYC, Atlanta, and elsewhere that has better economies. You can blame globalization and bad leadership for Detroit's woes.

Detroit has actually had a renaissance as of late (a slight population uptick), the downtown region has become somewhat livable in its own right. So I consider it on a positive trajectory. Dunno if COVID is going to make it worse though. It's pretty fragile. But parts of suburban Detroit were also on the upswing with tech jobs coming into the region. Ironically, a lot of Brooklynites have moved to Detroit as Brooklyn has become too expensive for starving artists.

NYC by contrast, has been having an outmigration for a number of years. It's way too expensive to live there, and this recently accelerated with so many jobs being wiped away by city mismanagement. Anyone working class has no incentive to live there. I don't blame NYC's outmigration on riots or COVID, I blame it on a city that for many years has become too expensive and unlivable for anyone but the rich. I dunno the contributing factors, but foreign investment probably is a big one (China).
 
Last edited:

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Jerry Seinfeld issued a rebuttal in the Times to Altucher's article. Basically he just whines and insults Altucher without offering a single solution. Basically playing the character from his show. Seinfeld doesn't even live in the city. The guy lives out in the Hamptons in a giant compound, but he conveniently calls it Long Island to attempt to sound like a common man.


Altucher issued a rebuttal to the rebuttal, which was funnier than Seinfeld's piece, in my opinion.

 

Towgunner

Woodpecker
Is NYC dead and gone? I really hope so. I used to go there all the time. I don't want to go into any city right now and for a very long time. Its a combination of all things bad. New York is a diseased place. Never mind Covid-19, its always dirty. And now its very violent. I recall writing a couple of months ago that Manhattan is surrounded by hostile communities. You have the Hudson on both sides, the harbor to the south and to the North is Harlem. Those rich liberal jerks on the upper east side have no where to run. And I'd like to see how they're solo MMA classes or Boxercise for wifey are going to help when the hoards come rushing in. Looks like all of our corporate gym rats ran like cowards.

Plus, the place is just degenerate. When I'm there I have this bizarre sensation that I'm among evil. Wall Street is not a good place. The people there are terrible people. I've worked with them my entire career. Back stabbing, greedy, egotistical...just all around horrid people. And to add insult to injury you have a socialist as mayor...the direct contrast to greedy, competitive, meritocratic Wall Street. This makes no sense to me. It appears the banks are all poz'd and "liberal", which confounds me to no end. Because, are we supposed to actually believe these institutions are paragons of virtue and equality? I can even muster a cliche sarcastic chuckle, because, such people are so incredibly hypocritical its just sad and depressing.

Covid may end someday, and as such, people may come back. That being said, what is definitely NOT coming back is the technology to work remotely. That is the death knell for all CBD's. I've long since maintained this thesis as part of my broader thesis on the impact of disruptive technologies.
 
Depends on what specific role. Ones that have a very clear quantitative metric of success usually are meritocratic. Ones that don't tend to be mostly political and dependent on the effectiveness of your ass kissing.
I agree Wall Street attracts highly talented people. By competitive i am referring to the industry itself which is the most coddled and subsidized in the economy. They lose, the Fed and Gov't cover their bets, they win, they take all. Even an idiot would win at black jack with a system like that. Secondly, many firms are ethnocentric. They may have AA hires but for example, - correct me if I am wrong - I don't think Goldman has ever had a non-Jewish CEO.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Is NYC dead and gone? I really hope so. I used to go there all the time. I don't want to go into any city right now and for a very long time. Its a combination of all things bad. New York is a diseased place. Never mind Covid-19, its always dirty. And now its very violent. I recall writing a couple of months ago that Manhattan is surrounded by hostile communities. You have the Hudson on both sides, the harbor to the south and to the North is Harlem. Those rich liberal jerks on the upper east side have no where to run. And I'd like to see how they're solo MMA classes or Boxercise for wifey are going to help when the hoards come rushing in. Looks like all of our corporate gym rats ran like cowards.

Plus, the place is just degenerate. When I'm there I have this bizarre sensation that I'm among evil. Wall Street is not a good place. The people there are terrible people. I've worked with them my entire career. Back stabbing, greedy, egotistical...just all around horrid people. And to add insult to injury you have a socialist as mayor...the direct contrast to greedy, competitive, meritocratic Wall Street. This makes no sense to me. It appears the banks are all poz'd and "liberal", which confounds me to no end. Because, are we supposed to actually believe these institutions are paragons of virtue and equality? I can even muster a cliche sarcastic chuckle, because, such people are so incredibly hypocritical its just sad and depressing.

Covid may end someday, and as such, people may come back. That being said, what is definitely NOT coming back is the technology to work remotely. That is the death knell for all CBD's. I've long since maintained this thesis as part of my broader thesis on the impact of disruptive technologies.

When NYC dies all the liberals will move to small towns and infect it with the pozz. This is starting to happen cities that used to be normal like Raleigh and Asheville. There is a mass exodus of California. God forbid they go to Texas.
 

What the "New York Strong" articles don't understand is that there's two classes of disasters. The first drives people away. The other keeps people away. The Germ will fade eventually, one way or another. Thats true. But capitulating to black marxist terrorism will keep the place barren. The 1970s Charles Bronson version of NYC was just downwind from the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Nobody ever points that out.

Its sort of like the auto industry in Detroit. The collapse of American car-making was an independent event of the rapidly changing demographics of the town (though you can easily argue it wasn't). The motor city still hasn't rose again. Maybe it doesn't have the pixie dust that NYC has.

I work from home due to COVID. I largely get about the same amount of work done although I believe that the team we have works so well because we had socialized in person. If we had all met remotely, I don't think they'd be as quick to pick up my phone calls.

That being said, I work(ed) in a great physical office. Fantastic cubicles so quiet when I needed it, collaboration in the conference room when I didn't.

But on the other hand, most large corporate environments are not like that anymore. They're packed like sardines into "open office floorplans" with everyone on headphones skyping someone next to them. This is common in Manhattan with high rents and turnover and management loving to be able to stand a literal watch over their employees like my cat plays with ants. I worked briefly in such an environment and dropped 17 pounds in 2 months due to stress. It was awful. I preferred to work at home compared to that sweatshop but the dork manager said "You have to come in 3 days a week for collaboration!" (Namely, having my headset on.)

So here's the thing: These termite office workers probably were HAPPY to be sent home due to COVID and not have to get on the subway for an hour (or two) to then be packed into a boiler room. COVID killed the open office floorplan one way or another either by making employees leave it altogether or doing the right thing and putting cubicles back. Therefore, we know: It's just leaving it altogether.

That being said, the physical connections matter. I brought chocolates for guys that diid me a favor and chatted them in the coffee room and met them at meetings and those went a long way emotionally and in helping to understand them mentally. Some folks like chatting a lot, some don't. Like with game, seeing and being around someone helped a lot versus "texting."

As workers are invited to come back, they have finally have the beta-blue-pill guts to tell their manager: "I hated that office and am not in a rush to return"
 
Seinfeld is a 66 year old stand up comic and actor. What does he know about white collar work? He has never worked in the modern digital economy.

I respect Seinfeld. Here's why: Being a standup comic isn't easy. Look at this trainwreck:

He wouldn't necessarily get paid much, if at all, would sometimes deal with bored or hostile crowds, and had to come up with new, original material and deliver it in a dynamic way.

Hmmm, sounds a lot like Game, doesn't it?

Not only that, but other comedians could steal his material. There's no "patent" on it although there is an honor system. Eventually, his jokes such as "why don't they make the whole airplane out of black boxes?" fall flat.

Aside from doing standup, he actually launched his own pilot (parodied in a Seinfeld episode of the same name) and managed to work that show up to a small-country-GDP within about 2 years. Astonishing.
 

R.G.Camara

Kingfisher
He's also not funny and never has been.

Eh, you can't really say that. 50 Million people watching your comedy show means you make a lot of people laugh.

Comedy is very subjective (it's why American comedy movies make less overseas than, say, American scifi or drama or superhero movies), so I'm careful to avoid saying X or Y isn't funny merely because I don't find it funny.

That said, Seinfeld doesn't make me laugh. The show was definitely over-hyped because he made Jewish-torture-others comedy, which many Jewish critics loved and promoted. But I have been in the room with non-Jews watching Seinfeld, and they were full on belly laughing. And, as I said, the numbers don't lie.

The test of comedy isn't whether it makes you laugh, but whether it makes lots of people laugh. You can't argue with success, when it comes comedy.
 
Eh, you can't really say that. 50 Million people watching your comedy show means you make a lot of people laugh.

Comedy is very subjective (it's why American comedy movies make less overseas than, say, American scifi or drama or superhero movies), so I'm careful to avoid saying X or Y isn't funny merely because I don't find it funny.

That said, Seinfeld doesn't make me laugh. The show was definitely over-hyped because he made Jewish-torture-others comedy, which many Jewish critics loved and promoted. But I have been in the room with non-Jews watching Seinfeld, and they were full on belly laughing. And, as I said, the numbers don't lie.

The test of comedy isn't whether it makes you laugh, but whether it makes lots of people laugh. You can't argue with success, when it comes comedy.

If you want a laugh, here's a video of stuck-up SJW millennials NOT laughing at Seinfeld and why. The Asian woman in particular is a riot as she is offended by pretty much EVERYTHING.

 
NYC is alright for a few years max.

There’s always gonna be a demand to live there. It’s just that now, smart people who don’t care so so much about it will have a way to get out.

People will move back in, but rents will be lower to adjust for the change in demand. Less well off people (125k-300k year) and more middle class.
 
Top