NYC is Dead Forever

NYC hasn't been fun for ten years or so, IMO. The ubiquity of the smartphone and social media really killed any specialness NYC or a lot of cities might have had. There's no more need to be anywhere, so there's no more drive to create places to be beyond being instagram backdrops.
There has been a similar pattern in cities worldwide, but particularly the US:
Corrupt Democrats turn Section 8 housing to Democratic donors, move blacks to the Republican suburbs (screaming racism! if you oppose it) and building luxury development for wealthy overseas globalists. The monoculture globalist 'cathedrals' are all the same - and often the high prices it creates drives out any real creativity - everything becomes like a sterile airport duty free shopping mall controlled by big globalist corporations. The local coffee shop closes, Starbucks or some other luxury brand moves in. The truly independent art gallery closes, the corporate sponsored independent looking but not independent thinking'arts center' replaces it. Wealthy hedge fund managers open resturaunts that lose money for tax write-offs, truly independent places have to close shop.

There is nothing interesting or unique about New York , or Chicago or Boston or San Francisco - incidentally under democrat rule all these citites lose blacks and gain globalists, while accusing red state america of being 'nazis'. Nice work if you can get it.

You're much more likely to find independently ran and owned restaurants, coffee shops, bars, in smaller towns.
 
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Deepdiver

Crow
Gold Member

This was weak years ago the Statehouse in Boston was talking about a new professional services tax on law firms, CPA firms and over 300 Mutual Funds... The Fidelity Investments CEO said if the tax was passed he would move his 15,000 employees out of MA to NH and RI... The tax was dropped and they now have approx 7000 employees in a huge campus on several hundred acres in Merrimack, NH.

If the NYC CEOs with 1.5 Million employees threatened to move out their 1.5 Million jobs Cuomo and the Albany state house would replace DeBlowsio in a New York minute.
 


There seems to be a little disconnect here with the soothsayers. They keep saying 'pandemic'. The Germ is old news. Indeed, very few are escaping the cities because of the 'pandemic' alone.

Our recent little color revolution is going to do it. Its happened before and it will happen again.

Because of the article above,the investor class is getting a little brave. In Minneapolis, there's supposed to be a more than a handful of people buying up cheap properties in the core and assuming they can flip them when the St. Floyd crime wave dies down. My personal opinion is that they've lost almost every penny they put down. Why? Well, Omar won her primary just recently, for one. She's there to stay, and so is the Somali-Muslim community that got her there. An entrenchment of Somalians isn't just going to 'turn itself around' folks. Nowhere on this planet has that happened, not even in tinkerbell Europe.
 
here's supposed to be a more than a handful of people buying up cheap properties in the core and assuming they can flip them
"Speculators" and Wall street actually like chaos - it is not an accident this pandemic made wealthy people wealthier - it's forced a lot of middle class and small business and property owners to sell.

'Block busting' is a real thing, it's often associated with 'antisemitism' -- for example the blacks in Jersey City after that shooting of Hasidic Jews were not reticent about it -it's perfectly reasonable to assume it's being done on a mass scale - Real estate developers aligned with the democratic party have been trying to drive out the poor and middle class from cities for decades. One of the most obvious places this was being done was Chicago.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
It was done on a large scale, in nearly all large US cities, and well documented byE. Michael Jones in his book "Slaughter of Cities":


 

Towgunner

Woodpecker
Boston's a dead town if not for biotech/pharma; by far one of the most corrupt industries out there!

I say good riddance. And I'm from the Boston area. I have become so disenchanted with this liberal sewer lately. Here's some other supporting items...much of Boston's GDP came from the financial services industry, namely, the mutual fund industry. Firms like Fidelity and Wellington manage billions of dollars in mutual funds and 401k's. In this instance, its a story of disruption. There is a net drain of assets moving from "active managed" funds, i.e. Fidelity etc, to "passive managed" funds. The later include things like ETFs. All passive funds charge significantly lower management fee's, which is how an asset management company makes money. And so there is a route of assets from active to passive. At the same time the remaining pie is subjected to over capacity. Simply, there are far too many Fidelity's out there. Worse still, these funds have been lagging, yes lagging, in performance to the indexes. Meaning, they're not keeping up with ETFs in terms of returns. And so, this industry is pointed in a secular downturn and it will only get worse. Albeit, its kind of a slow drip for now. That said, asset managers will have to continually shed headcount every so often. This is one of the biggest industries in Boston and its caving.

Add in sufficient bandwidth for teleconferences and a false pandemic to expose how unnecessary central business districts are and...well, we'll see.
 

kel

Pelican


There seems to be a little disconnect here with the soothsayers. They keep saying 'pandemic'. The Germ is old news. Indeed, very few are escaping the cities because of the 'pandemic' alone.

When talking about this whole situation, I specifically don't use the word "pandemic" or even "virus", "COVID", etc. I talk only about the "shutdown". Because that's, ultimately, what is happening. The reasoning could have been a million different things, the important part is there's this ridiculous shutdown and everything we're experiencing comes from that, not any virus.
 

Cortés

Woodpecker
Gold Member

lol


No seriously. What a dump.

I wonder if they'll fine the hundreds of Orthodox Jews that get the green light to congregate in the streets shoulder to shoulder
 

Johnny Rico

Woodpecker
Boston's a dead town if not for biotech/pharma; by far one of the most corrupt industries out there!

Boston might be the biggest shithole in the US. Its impossible to get anywhere - the roads make no sense and are covered in 6 inch deep potholes with endless construction. MBTA is disgusting and irrational by design. The "tough Boston guy" is fake and annoying and they are always looking for confrontation - Everything out of their mouths is profanity laced with an overdone fake accent cause "I'm from Bawsten" and all they are capable of talking about is sports. The girls are ugly and loudmouthed. The city is way overpriced and every time I have to go there I dread it.

Boston Sucks.
 

Handsome Creepy Eel

Owl
Gold Member

I don't understand how any restaurant can ever be profitable if constant 75% occupancy is required just to break even. That's an insane number. It means that the restaurant must be running like an assembly line factory from the moment it opens to the moment it closes. How does that possibly function? Surely it means that either restaurant prices must increase if that industry is to be sustainable.
 

Easy_C

Crow
That’s generally correct in NYC, but they’re only running at an assembly line pace during meal hours. A hit to capacity means you’re losing out on the bulk of business during your busiest hours.

The restaurant industry is also very much an uphill battle because you’re paying too much rent and competing against chains that have the ability to take more shortcuts and more negotiation power with suppliers.
 

homersheineken

Kingfisher
That’s generally correct in NYC, but they’re only running at an assembly line pace during meal hours. A hit to capacity means you’re losing out on the bulk of business during your busiest hours.

The restaurant industry is also very much an uphill battle because you’re paying too much rent and competing against chains that have the ability to take more shortcuts and more negotiation power with suppliers.

And can have very profitable individual stores subsidize the losers that are there to maintain a presence or capture market share.
 
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