Older RVF Members: How would you compare 1965-1975 to the present day?

Uprising

Woodpecker
I'm not sure where the appropriate section on this forum is to put this topic, so mods feel free to move it where you see fit.

I have become a bit depressed with everything that's going on in the world today. It feels a bit like I'm in a bad dream that I can't wake up from, with the COVID hysteria, masks, inevitable forced vaccinations coming, racial riots, talks of a coupe de grace in our elections not from fringe online sites but from huge media conglomerates....... It can seem at times like the world is either coming to an end, or that eventually we will want it to come to an end if the world keeps moving in the direction that it's moving in.

I know this forum tends to skew towards middle age, but perhaps there are some members here who are old enough to remember the 1965-1975 period in America or Europe (meaning you were at least a teenager during at least some of these years).

Is the world today as bad as the world was from roughly 1965-1975? I know comparing 1 year in 2020 to a whole decade of 1965-1975 is maybe an unfair comparison, but it seems like that was the last time frame in which the world was a really, really bad place. At least in The West. You had racial riots similar to like we have now, after 1969 you had a very real chance of going to fight and die in a pointless war in some shitty jungle in Vietnam, you had substance abuse rise as it is rising now, a Cold War with the threat of nukes that seemed like it (the Cold War) would never end, radical feminists and societal pressures changing society and altering it in a way that was almost unrecognizable to the previous generation, the start of massive immigration to the USA from non-European third world countries and over in Western Europe the same type of immigration in many countries, McCarthy warning us on the communist takeover of our institutions while being smeared and branded as a conspiracy theorists by large conglomerate media organizations (sound familiar?)............

Over in Eastern Europe at the time, the restrictions of travel and freedom of movement, military and police enforcing a totalitarian government's rules, 1984 slogans and propaganda being forced upon the people, encouraging of ratting out your neighbors to the Stasi, worsening economic conditions, censorship, harsh punishment for speaking out against anything the regime was and stood for...........

There just seem to be so many parallels between the year 2020 and 1965-1975. If I think about it some more, perhaps you could lump together the years 2015 - 2020 into one bloc as to when the world really started changing and the madness started to kick in. The Globalists started their massive importation of people from the third world into Europe with over a million illegals coming into Europe in 2015 alone, Brexit and Trump in 2016, numerous terrorists attacks in Europe in 2017, the COVID madness of 2020.........

For those who were at least teenagers during some of the 1965 - 1975 period, how would you compare roughly 2015 - 2020 to 1965 - 1975? Did it seem like the world was coming to an end in 1965 - 1975? Did it ever feel like things would ever get better? Did it feel like you were living in a bad 1984 dream that you couldn't wake up from?

How would you compare then and now?

I don't want anybody to sugar coat their answers but at the same time, with as depressing and frustrating as 2020 has been, it would also be great to hear some positive views from the older generation that things will get better and that this madness will one day pass with brighter horizons on the bay.

It is simply unbelievable how much the world has changed since the start of 2015, a mere (almost) 6 years ago.
 
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Thomas More

Hummingbird
I was 11 in 1975, so that's almost a teen. It's weird to look back on those times and compare them to now.

On the one hand, we were sure the world was ending, and Christ's soon return was at hand. The elimination of prayer in schools. The riots, drugs, sexual revolution, rebellions and wars, threat of nuclear holocaust. Wars of elimination against Israel.

Matthew 24:32 "Now learn this lesson from the fig tree: As soon as its branches become tender and sprout leaves, you know that summer is near. 33So also, when you see all these things, you will know that He is near, right at the door. 34Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all these things have happened."

This was seen to mean that Christ's second coming would be within one generation of the rebirth of Israel, prophesied thousands of years ago. "As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man. ". Christ said that in the days before his return, wickedness would greatly increase. It all fit. Things were rapidly spinning out of control. America was on the decline. Godless communism was on the rise.

On the other hand, I grew up in a small, mid-western town, that was almost all white, and almost all Christian. In a lot of ways, my life was like a Norman Rockwell painting. That's not to mean it was ideal. I had a lot of angst, and my parents had various personality flaws that made things hard for me. However, the houses, decor, family get-togethers, and such; these were all pure Americana, like what you see in a Rockwell painting. His paintings were set in a slightly earlier era, but anytime we visited someone in their 50s or older, their home was likely to still have furnishings and decor from the 40s and 50s, so a lot of the things in those pictures look like my childhood memories. My grandparents and great grandparents told me stories of their lives, and it was like Little House on the Prairie or Tom Sawyer.

So, it was idyllically traditional and wholesome, but it also looked like the end of the world was at hand.
 
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2020 seems bad, but mostly because it has become trendy within social media to point out all the "bad" of this year because panic sells. I did not live through the 60's and 70s but my neighbor did: (Vietnam Vet, Cold War Vet, Desert Storm) He is not distressed about the events of 2020 in as much as his declining health... Enjoy your health and don't waste energy on the woes of the time. The world will always have troubles, but you won't always have health.
 
I was not alive to know, but between growing up in a very conservative area and listening to older generations talk about it, I did want to add this great point made by Jim Goad. Jim Goad often says when he was a kid in the 1950's and 60's there were three Americans. There was America, which was by default white people America and then anyone who wasn't white but assimilated into Christian white America. There was black America, and you sort of forgot about black America unless you were in the South or were watching a sporting event (which was far less viewed in those days), and there was Native America.

If you watch movies from this time you will see this. And the white Americans felt bad/guilty for the plight of Native Americans so they did their best to honor their fighting spirit. So many of the sports teams were named after Native Americans, not to insult them but to honor them. Many of the movies from the 50's and 60's were westerns (do they even still make westerns?) and these always included Native Americas who were depicted often with honor, even if they were the bad guys in the film.

Watching movies from this era gives you a glimpse of what life was like in those days and Goad seems to have his finger on the pulse of what life was like that then. What I experienced and talk to older folks about, this reflects what I experienced.

Another point was in the 1960's - suburban America was a newer concept. A majority of Americans either lived in the urban areas or the rural areas and had a deeper attachment to their community and neighbors. E. Michael Jones talks about this a lot with his experience of growing up in the city and to this day you can still get a feel for this in the rural areas.

I guess the big changes really started in 1965, with the passing of the civil rights act and other legislation passed under Johnson. 1965-1975 was the beginning of the new America. Where was say 1955-1965 was the end of the old America and my post more pertains to the prior 1965 era, though it could still be felt through 1975.
 

Sherman

Ostrich
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In the 60s and 70s, there was some sense things were falling apart. You had riots and would hear “Burn baby, burn” on the radio. If you were of draft age, the Vietnam war was a huge issue. The right-wing then was convinced that it was all carefully engineered by the Communists. Remember this was during the cold war.

But there was also an underlying optimism that the younger generation was discovering a better way to live and “never trust anyone over 30”.

I would say that today is worse. There is nothing worse than isolation and loneliness. Having lockdowns and wearing masks is definitely a new low. I am afraid that now the elites have greatly increased their control on the pretext of a medical emergency, going back to the way it was just a year ago is going to require a world wide revolutionary struggle spanning multiple generations.

Optimism of 60s


Right wing response
 

SpyofMoses

Pigeon
I am young, but my father answered the same question from me just some months ago. He graduated high school in the late 70's. (Not sure if this is the kind of response you're looking for, but I had the same thoughts as you, so this seems relevant.)

When i asked him how he would compare then and now, he said:
"Well of course it was crazy with the Cold War going on and the protesting against Vietnam, but back then the people were more conformist. Now, with the internet, everyone has their own ideas of what is right and how the world should be run."
 
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EndlessGravity

Woodpecker
There are parallels you can draw and similar symptoms of the same problem. However, here's the contrasting factors, which show us this time, it's going to be different:
  • Everyone the world over is deeply over-leveraged and broke
  • The US dollar is losing its reserve status
  • Rioting has gone nationwide and even global
  • Political violence has been openly sanctioned by the elite
  • Those in charge have consolidated power in all institutions in the country
  • Technology has created an Orwellian society beyond his wildest dreams
  • Demographic shifts are accelerating beyond what can be controlled anymore
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Short answer, 1965 is when it all started, and 2020 is where it lead 55 years later. Mass immigration, "free trade", leftie/hippy culture, new age (satanism) religion replacing Christianity, "women's lib" and "sexual revolution" destroying the family, homosexual behavior no longer stigmatized, destruction of Black society through "Great Society" welfare programs, complete zionist takeover of US political aparatus (Kennedy assassination and USS Liberty), end of gold-backed US$, all of this took place in the late 60s/early 70s.

Boomers came of age in that period, in the largest, most successful social engineering project that turned a highly functional, affluent conservative Christian society into a broken degenerate one in the span of two generations.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
You could still have a childhood back then. And problems were to a large extent regional. And despite real social problems, people had more trust in the ability of institutions to fix things. You could still believe the future might be better than the past.

The weight of the entire world is beamed into the brains of young people now from a very young age, and no one even thinks to look away. It is much harder now to be young and it isn't fair. Whether intentional or not, the web seems perfectly designed to make people give up before they start.

Does that answer your question? If you are feeling like the problems are too big to dump on a generation and that it isn't fair, you are correct.

Only 911 knows who is to blame and what the solution is.

I certainly don't.
 

Sherman

Ostrich
There are parallels you can draw and similar symptoms of the same problem. However, here's the contrasting factors, which show us this time, it's going to be different:
  • Technology has created an Orwellian society beyond his wildest dreams
Yes, the cursed technology. Back then, someone with a nice uniform would approach your car and you would say “fill er up”. Now you pump your own gas. Technology just means that you do everything yourself which a friendly human use to do. And people would walk around relaxed rather than staring at their smart phone. The technology has made everyone’s life more miserable and dependent on machines. It’s an out-of-control monster. I have a picture of Ted Kaczynski on my wall.
 

Uprising

Woodpecker
You could still have a childhood back then. And problems were to a large extent regional. And despite real social problems, people had more trust in the ability of institutions to fix things. You could still believe the future might be better than the past.

The weight of the entire world is beamed into the brains of young people now from a very young age, and no one even thinks to look away. It is much harder now to be young and it isn't fair. Whether intentional or not, the web seems perfectly designed to make people give up before they start.

Does that answer your question? If you are feeling like the problems are too big to dump on a generation and that it isn't fair, you are correct.


Only 911 knows who is to blame and what the solution is.

I certainly don't.
I guess I just wanted somebody who is older and wiser than me to tell me it's going to be alright. The world has gone mad and I see no end in sight. Surely those from the older generations must have felt the same way at some point in their lives.
 

EndlessGravity

Woodpecker
I guess I just wanted somebody who is older and wiser than me to tell me it's going to be alright. The world has gone mad and I see no end in sight. Surely those from the older generations must have felt the same way at some point in their lives.
It's going to be alright. Even in the very worst of times, people still fall in love, get married, have children, and raise families. I'll be damned if I let them stop me from doing that without a hell of a fight. This is true even if the challenges are probably going to be significantly bigger.

However, which would you prefer, to be resigned to the mediocrity of other ages or go through the fire of the forge that will be the 2020s?

These are the years where men will etch their names for decades to come. Get you pen, baby.
 

Hypno

Crow
You would really need to be about 65 to have any perspective on OP's question.

I'm over 50. I remember the inflation in the late 70s, Jimmy Carter dropping the speed limit to 55, interest rates through the roof, and everyone hating Reagan's first 2 years. I also remember the AIDS panic and the end of the sexual revolution. I remember a gay dentist in Arcadia Florida intentionally spreading AIDS to a patient, Kimberly Bergalis, a virgin, so AIDS would seem like "we are all in this together" and not something to require the gays to be quarantined.
 

Lace em up

Woodpecker
Growing up in a suburb of NYC in the 70's has given me some perspective, I think.

The biggest difference from then and recent years is how kids are raised.

When I was a kid, besides walking uphill to and from school, we were outside doing kid shit all the time. We'd check in at home after school and then we were out. We were out hanging out with other kids. No parents were hovering over us. "Be home when the street lights come on" or dinner time, whichever came first. You didnt need to guess where Id be on Fridays at 8 o'clock when the Dukes of Hazard came on though.

Want to build a clubhouse? We need to make plans and hustle up a buck. Raking leaves and shoveling snow was easy money, but building material was expensive. Pallets could be disassembled for boards and nails can be straightened. It was a lot of work humping materials and building but once finished we had our own place to tear down and rebuild bicycles, nobody bought new bicycles back then and our bicycles all had banana seats and playing cards fastened so they hit the spokes as you rode.

Arcade games were hitting the scene and pinball was still cool and both of those stripped some of us of our earnings. One of us discovered if you taped thread to a quarter, you could jiggle it at just the right spot and could get as many as 52 credits for 25c. That was awesome but soon they sharpened an edge in there and it would break the string... oh well.

Nothing prepares a kid for life like finding customers and shoveling snow with his friends all day and bellying up to the counter at the luncheonette and deciding on buying a grilled cheese or a cheeseburger with his hard earned cash.

In the waning days of 5th grade a few of us decided to cross to the dark side and work hourly jobs for the summer. Still looked forward to falling leaves and a good snowfall, but canvassing neighborhoods with flyers was decent pay and we got to ride in the back of a van with tools and equipment. We counted days until we could get working papers and learners permits.

Paper routes were prime gigs. My friends and I saw our routes outsourced to girls and soon after, when it switched to billing instead of door to door collecting every week, adults took over all the routes. I guess the handwriting was on the wall.

Being a young man meant getting into shit and discovering and figuring things out. We werent locked inside, sat in front of a TV / computer screen with overbearing supervision by Karens of the world. We were out there handling shit.
 

RalphMalph

Pigeon
My very earliest memories are from 1954. Back then most mothers stayed at home, working mothers were evident but there were not many. The neighborhood looked after everybody. And yes there were telephones back then. If you ever watched "A Christmas Story" look at the scene were Ralph's mom calls another mother to report that the woman's son was doing wrong. That's is 1940's/1950's neighborhood crime prevention in a nutshell.

If you look at the stats, there was a boom in purchases of televisions starting in 1954 here in the States. That is when my family purchased one. One could get three stations where we lived. And only the wealthiest families in the area had color televisions later in the 50's. NBC was the first network to colorize.

One could buy a Popsicle for 3 cents. Large candy bars were 5 cents. And you could go to the Saturday matinee for 25 cents. Penny candy was bartered between kids like pirate gold. Marbles and baseball cards were all the rage. And if you had a bike, you were in heaven. One could travel all over the neighborhood or even to the other end of town and you weren't bothered at all.

And yes, sports were not well organized in my town. Oh sure we had Little league, but sandlot games were far more fun, no adults to supervise you and no pesky mothers or girls around. You could make your own rules while you played the game and there was a sense of fairness about how we set up our own rules. Today the "Karens" have to get all involved in child sports and to a kid that has to be absolutely embarrassing.
 
My very earliest memories are from 1954. Back then most mothers stayed at home, working mothers were evident but there were not many. The neighborhood looked after everybody. And yes there were telephones back then. If you ever watched "A Christmas Story" look at the scene were Ralph's mom calls another mother to report that the woman's son was doing wrong. That's is 1940's/1950's neighborhood crime prevention in a nutshell.

If you look at the stats, there was a boom in purchases of televisions starting in 1954 here in the States. That is when my family purchased one. One could get three stations where we lived. And only the wealthiest families in the area had color televisions later in the 50's. NBC was the first network to colorize.

One could buy a Popsicle for 3 cents. Large candy bars were 5 cents. And you could go to the Saturday matinee for 25 cents. Penny candy was bartered between kids like pirate gold. Marbles and baseball cards were all the rage. And if you had a bike, you were in heaven. One could travel all over the neighborhood or even to the other end of town and you weren't bothered at all.

And yes, sports were not well organized in my town. Oh sure we had Little league, but sandlot games were far more fun, no adults to supervise you and no pesky mothers or girls around. You could make your own rules while you played the game and there was a sense of fairness about how we set up our own rules. Today the "Karens" have to get all involved in child sports and to a kid that has to be absolutely embarrassing.
Aside from the prices, those of us as young as GenX, who lived in rural areas, had childhoods like this well into the late 80s. Only major exception being the prices mentioned, but they were still drastically lower than today.
 
I was born in 66 but was aware of current events towards 1975 onwards. I would say the turmoil we are experiencing now is similar to 65 to 75. THEY tried to bring down our civilization then but really couldn’t do it. They really have been working us over ever since. Although the 80’s, 90’s and 2000’s may have seemed to be peaceful and prosperous they were undermining our society and setting us up for round 2. I think because of Trump they decided to go for it now a little sooner than they intended. So now is definitely worse. Don’t forget 1970 no Roe vs Wade allowing massive infanticide. Homosexuality was still rightly listed as a mental disorder. Contrast that with now with Sacrilegious homosexual marriage and ever increasing so called Transgenderism. THEY have many more useful pawns to use to bring it all down now compared to then. I culture is definitely not what is was then. I doubt this virus scam could have been pulled off back then. I am quite sure no one would have obeyed mask mandates.
 
The external threats were so much greater then than now. Communism was on the march, US was chock full of terrorism movements, many countries would subsequently go under and then take painstaking decades to pull themselves out. We were in an age of innocence about drug use, alcohol use, smoking, lead, asbestos, really really crappy food.

The internal threats are so much greater now than then. Distraction being foremost, in 1000 different ways. A relentlessly depressing and perverted media. And so you must now take even greater care with whom you associate and spend time with than in prior times, imho. Today you simply can't spend alot of time with associates that have been pickled in our culture and not take on their pale.

The future, in each instance, looks bleak if you wish it to. But, in how different ways do we have to say it, tomorrow will have it own problems, you should have enough on your plate for today.
 
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