Older RVF Members: How would you compare 1965-1975 to the present day?

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
I guess I just wanted somebody who is older and wiser than me to tell me it's going to be alright. The world has gone mad and I see no end in sight. Surely those from the older generations must have felt the same way at some point in their lives.


There's a reason so many people on the forum have gotten religion. Even in the good times secular thrills feel like a dead end eventually.

Many have come to the conclusion that pursuing a life of the spirit is ultimately the only way to be all right.

If you haven't tried this, at least look in to it, and figure out whether or not there is a God and which God he is, to the best of your abilities.

If nothing else, it will get your mind off the news.
 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
I'm over 50. I remember the inflation in the late 70s, Jimmy Carter dropping the speed limit to 55, interest rates through the roof, and everyone hating Reagan's first 2 years. I also remember the AIDS panic and the end of the sexual revolution. I remember a gay dentist in Arcadia Florida intentionally spreading AIDS to a patient, Kimberly Bergalis, a virgin, so AIDS would seem like "we are all in this together" and not something to require the gays to be quarantined.

I'm about your age, I remember that too - though I think it was Nixon who dropped the speed limit to 55 MPH, supposedly as a temporary measure to conserve fuel. Jimmy Carter was the one who told us all to put sweaters on instead of turning up the heat. Then one day a shitty little country called Iran or something made us look weaker than weak, especially when the once great US military fell on its face trying to rescue hostages from our embassy after four hundred plus days of captivity. Reagan came along and made us feel good about being Americans again. It was enough to turn me conservative at an early age - even if I didn't yet understand the GOP would prove to be nothing more than agents of donors who pretended to be conservatives just long enough to get elected. It would be a while still before I realized how Iran got put into the position they were in, why we protected the Shah, and how it used to be a nice place to visit before we put Zionism at the front of the foreign policy line and pissed off everybody over there.

But a lot of that was late 1970s, not 1965-1975. I do remember the early 1970s when I was younger. My best friend in kindergarten was a black kid with a huge afro. We heard about some country we were at war with called Vietnam - ok, whatever, we still thought it was the Germans and Japanese. And later, long lines at gas stations, first in '73, then again in '78. Both times they told us kids the world was running out of gas, when the reality was the Arabs were pissed at us for helping the Israelis so they turned off the tap. There were still bomb scares at my elementary school, but by the mid-70s few people took them seriously. They had nothing to do with Arabs, but boomer teens on PCP, probably.

The teachers, the left leaning news and the "public service message" psyop trained us to hate big cars, to be against nuclear power, and to support the idea of a deposit on soda cans. Funny thing about that last bit - when my home state passed the 5 cent per can/bottle bill, the empty beer cans all over the high school parking lot disappeared overnight. But there were still the small vodka and whiskey bottles - that's what happens in high school when the drinking age is 18. Cigarette butts were everywhere since the school not only allowed smoking, they had designated areas for the students to light up. The odor of weed when they hung around outside toking up was pretty strong too.

The broadcast music in the mid 1970s really sucked if you didn't live near a major city with lots of options. "Don't rock the boat baby," "have you never been mellow" - it was awful. Disco came later, but let's not even go there. Even if you caught a good song the damned DJ would talk over the first and last ten seconds of it every time, so forget about trying to tape a copy you could listen to later. But we had tunes from earlier bands who made music first and worried about appearances later. If only they would have stopped breaking up or dying before the cheesy stuff came along.

We couldn't get shit to watch on TV, except maybe on UHF where the cool re-runs of the 1960s science fictions shows and old monster movies were. The rest of the three channels had nothing but stupid game shows during the day, which didn't matter since there was plenty to do outside and all kinds of kids in the neighborhood, all outside playing. If it rained you went to a friends house and built shit with erector sets or maybe play a board game. At night you might get something to watch, if your parents let you - but they had to share the TV too, so it was a consensus effort. We couldn't ever imagine "smart" phones or individual drone-out devices per occupant. Divorce was rare, family dinners were not.

1976 was the American Bicentennial, which meant everything looked like the 4th of July, for the entire summer. I recall lots of red white and blue banners and paint hanging all over the place. There were also huge ugly cars that seemed to get slower and slower every year. The smell of the thick vinyl seats in the summer. They were so hot it would stick to your exposed legs in the heat - I could only pray my parents would get fabric interior in their next car. It seemed like everyone of my teachers wore way too much odd colored polyester - what the hell is a leisure suit anyway?

I cut grass to make extra money, shoveled some snow and walked around the neighborhood selling tickets to the Boy Scouts dinner as a fund raiser. I beat every other scout in my neighborhood to the punch - you snooze, you lose, I reckoned. Paper routes were still a thing. I didn't have one of my own, but I filled in for the three other dudes in my neighborhood who had them. One had the morning paper, one the evening (yes, two papers in the same day), and one the Sunday paper.

It was easy money but I would have given anything for a basket on my three speed Huffy bicycle instead of the newspaper bag slung over the shoulder. Then as fewer people read papers, the routes got spread out more, and it didn't make sense to have 10 year old boys on bikes delivering the few remaining subscriptions. Paper routes went away as an income opportunity, but you could still collect cans and bottles or cut grass if your parents let you use their mower. What the hell, we all converted our three speeds into BMX bikes and built a dirt ramp in the vacant lot next door. Jumped pretty high. No helmets. No fucking ADD meds either. Gender re-assignment? Go smoke some pot or something.

It wasn't until I came home from college in the late 80s that I started to notice more landscaping companies cutting the grass. What the hell is going on with the kids in the neighborhood? Doesn't anyone cut grass anymore? Don't they want to make some money? I didn't get what was going on, but at least there were still white guys running the lawnmowers not shady Mexicans with no legal status and questionable criminal histories.

So what was it like being a Gen Xer through all of that? It wasn't terrible, but It still felt like the party was over - like we missed something - and that the people ahed of us got the best of everything.

The boomers got 18 year old drinking ages, free love and said "You can't trust anyone over 30!"
We got Mothers Against Drunk Driving, AIDS, and signs reading "We ID all under 30."

I still hate boomers for that. Fuck you all.


To answer your question OP, there will be pockets of better here and there, but no, it will never go back.
 
I was born while Nixon was still in office, so maybe I can sneak in.

It seems like things were rough coming out of the 1970's: Soviets were unbeatable, the US was humiliated by the Iran hostage crisis, we had basically just lost our first war in Vietnam, we were not doing anything in space, and I remember price controls where companies could not raise prices over some published amount in a vain attempt to control inflation. I remember it being cold back then--winters were cold and heat was expensive. People were worried about global cooling and the resulting famines from poor crops.

It turned around in the 1980's, not just materially but in spirit as well. The Space Shuttle was a big part of that, I remember watching Columbia take off with Young and Crippen one morning on our small black and white TV set. There was the whole arms race and the media was telling us that we could all die at any moment, but really, I do not think that anyone lost much sleep over it. The two countries had missiles point at each other for decades by that point. The Soviets were, however, expanding on nearly every continent, and that was more concerning. Back then, if anyone kneeled for the anthem, they would have been kicked in the face. I remember the whole theater giving a standing ovation when Rocky cut Ivan Drago in Rocky IV. While the 1970's had race riots and such, they basically took a hiatus until the Rodney King riot in 1991.

For the longest we had NBC, ABC, and CBS via a VHF antenna, and PBS on UHF. Monday morning at least a 1/3rd of your classmates had seen the same movie the night before. Later on, most families either got a huge satellite dish or a VCR. VCR tapes could be $20 each to buy a movie, and $70+ for a new release. Rentals were usually for one night. Eventually cable TV moved in and people had no idea what they would do with 30 channels. Where I was, we ended up with KTLA and KTTV out of LA. Mtv had music videos, and sometimes concerts. AIDS came along and overnight a lot of the sexy advertisements went away. Maybe I was just a kid then, but I remember ads back then being really racy sometimes.

But for most of the time, people did not watch TV all day. The nerdy kids played roll playing games like D&D, Top Secret, and Traveler. Some kids read, a lot. After school jobs were common, and practically everyone had a summer job.

Music was a big deal. Walkmen came into style, then sort of went out of style. Music was on tapes, which was not great quality, but you got plenty of it because you would copy tapes from your buddies. In most areas, it was just top 40 radio, and a lot of music you were never exposed to unless you moved to a more populated area. Will say that the 1980's had tremendous variety, even in the top 40. Artists could try just about anything. Prince, Huey Lewis, Cyndi Lauper, and Van Halen all popular at the same time. But, with Mtv the less photogenic bands seemed to fade away, and talent was lost with that.

I think the biggest loss was it seemed that back then, if you really wanted to be a success you would go to college, but if you just wanted a normal middle class existence, you could get a job, any job, then wait for an opening at one of the local industries. Every town had a mine, or a factory, or someplace that payed decently. It seemed that if you were willing to show up on time and stay out of trouble, you could have at least a lower-middle class existence just about anywhere. People got married and had kids earlier. I lived in a border state and illegal aliens were rare, usually being driven back to the border by whatever cut-rate contractor hired them. This was pre-NAFTA and pre-Made in China. We were worried about competing with Japan, but Japan was not a low-wage country, so it was a fight we could stand our ground in when we tried hard enough.

Computers were a big thing, everyone knew they were going to be big, but really no one predicted the web as we know it. Mainly we had home PC's connected to nothing and traded bootleg games with other people at school. Back then you had to use a modem to connect to a bulletin board to have anything to do online, and that got expensive as in a lot of places that meant a long distance call. Long distance calls were expensive back then.

The gun debates were about if this or that firearm was suitable for hunting. There was no concealed carry to speak of. Crime was getting higher every year. This was during the wave of state hospital deinstitutionaliztion, and the homeless population showed up, and random, senseless crimes.

When Reagan made his farewell address in January 1988, he said that the younger generation had to be taught about what was good about America, to show them what there was to be patriotic about. That was when those coming of age were already patriotic. Unfortunately, that was taken up as a challenge by the lefties, who imposed political correctness in the 1990's, and then the SJW mentality in the 2000's by teaching everyone they could that they ought to hate America. If only they knew what we had.
 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
EDIT - forgot to mention earlier - back then it was possible to watch something from Hollywood that did not have a sex scene in it. People under 35 have a hard time imagining what this was like, but it was true. There was still an element of shame and modesty in the culture.

The moral subversion was well underway since the end of the Production Code in 1965, but it had to be much more subtle in those days. Now of course, forget about it - subtlety be dammed. Even sporting events are interspersed with messages about boner pills, sex lube and whatever else would never come up in polite discussion back then. We sure as hell wouldn't know what to think if we saw purple vibrators for sale down at the local CVS.

If you wanted porno, you had to steal a copy of Playboy from your uncle. X rated theaters were still in dive areas of big cities, and they knew better than to let young people in and risk a bust. We couldn't ever imagine a device with nonstop selections of hard core fap material in the pocket everywhere we went. And I don't think we would have believed a prediction of all the social twists really doing a number on young guys trying to develop in this world, fatherless, drugged up and isolated.

I feel for you, OP - it's gotta suck being deprived of both your childhood and a regular adolescence, free from evil manipulation.

After the pill came out, there was a brief "magic time" of free love in the late 60s-early 70s that only lasted long enough until the ugly feminists realized they weren't treated the same as all the hot women. By the mid-70s, the feminists got angry if you so much as held a door open for them. Then AIDS came along, but oddly didn't stop the continuing slide into debauchery like some prognosticators smugly predicted. STDs thrived as the hookup culture kicked into high gear, and the porno only got harder, and from what people are saying now, weirdly geared towards anal sex in every video. The producers are trying to blur the lines between homosexuality and heterosexuality, teaching that a hole is a hole, no matter where. Unsurprisingly there's all kinds of fucked up results, willing cuck behavior, gender switching, dudes marrying each other, "polyamory" etc.

Back then, there were the gay sections of the states and cities, but now do those sections really seem any different? Every establishment has the rainbow flag of surrender hanging outside - it's hard to tell Little Italy from Fire Island.

Eventually we got to where we are now - total sexual "liberation." Who really believes that? This sure as hell isn't the kind of liberation we would have eagerly accepted back in the 70s if you told us where this was going. It's interesting OP picked 1965 as the start date, because that's when the social engineering really began in earnest - we witness the fruits of that evil and deliberate effort on a daily basis. Men like EMJ who try to explain it all are zeroed out and deplatformed, but that still won't hide the truth of the past or mask the direction of where we will wind up.

In that sense, it is already getting better as the truth leaks out, OP. It may piss you off at first, it may make you uncomfortable, but I'd rather know than not know.
 

Blitz

Sparrow
My dad was born in England to a father who reached as high a ranking as a civilian could fighting the nAZiS. They left in 1960 for Canada because, as my dad put it, my grandpa was sickened by how un-English England was becoming even then.

Point being, it would have been amazing to live in London in the mid to late 60s, and life was 'simpler' back then, largely because people were simpler and didn't have access to nearly as much free information. But that simpleness was the paved runway for the elites to implement the full spectrum degeneracy we're living in now.

So do I prefer ignorant bliss or full knowledge of how, why and who has let western civilization get to where it is now?
 
My dad was born in England to a father who reached as high a ranking as a civilian could fighting the nAZiS. They left in 1960 for Canada because, as my dad put it, my grandpa was sickened by how un-English England was becoming even then.
Same thing happened to Australia. In the 60s and early 70s a large amount of British came to Australia either for opportunity or to get away from what the UK was becoming. Guess what they did... if you said vote and act the same way in Australia as they did back home you’d be correct.
 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
I was born in 65. I remember Nixon and watergate, although I didn’t understand it. I remember two fuel crisis, and long gas lines.

I was really into hockey then, and knew just about every NHL player by name. now I know no players and have no interest.

I was fairly oblivious to race, except for being aware of the few blacks in my school. My best friend in elementary school was a minority, but I never realized it until I was an adult. I think he’s Indian (dot or feather). Because the religion of diversity and multiculturalism didn’t exist then, we were pretty much oblivious to race and it was a non issue, except for bleqs which is hard to ignore. We had maybe 3-4 blacks in my grade, and they were accepted and even popular.

I remember there was a lot more pollution then, but I only saw it when I left the comfort of suburbia. Of course, America was a lot more industrial then, and you’d see smoke billowing out of smoke stacks.

I remember Billie Jean King and some old dude had a tennis match. The battle of The sexes. I knew Billie Jean was a dyke, even though I was just a kid.

Streaking was big for awhile.

I remember the bicentennial, as others have mentioned. 1976. It was a summer long celebration of patriotism. I remember Elton John’s “Philadelphia Freedom” being popular. My family had a Fourth of July party in our back yard, and I remember my mother made a cake with a flag , white frosting, strawberries made up the red stripes, blueberries were used.

I don’t look back on the 70s fondly. I think the 80s was the best decade ever, and the 90s were pretty good too. I liked being a young adult better than being a kid. The fashion in the 70s sucked. Even home decor was so ugly. Pop music sucked, though album rock was pretty good. I liked novelty songs as a kid, like Dead Skunk in the Middle of the Road, and I Don't Like Spiders and Snakes. We made fun of Billy Don’t be a Hero.

1970s humor was awful, so corny. Carol Burnett, Bob Hope, even Steve Martin looking back at it.
 

Blitz

Sparrow
Same thing happened to Australia. In the 60s and early 70s a large amount of British came to Australia either for opportunity or to get away from what the UK was becoming. Guess what they did... if you said vote and act the same way in Australia as they did back home you’d be correct.

My dad's brother actually went to Australia in I guess the early 1970s. He's fairly mainstream right leaning from what I can gather, but there's definitely a deference to 'there's the "you're a white privileged racist" line, we'll stay well back of that now chaps, just to be safe' mindset. From what I now of Australia, even like 10 years(?) ago it was thought of as a country that didn't let immigrants in, now it's almost Canada levels of cucking, per capita.
 
My dad's brother actually went to Australia in I guess the early 1970s. He's fairly mainstream right leaning from what I can gather, but there's definitely a deference to 'there's the "you're a white privileged racist" line, we'll stay well back of that now chaps, just to be safe' mindset. From what I now of Australia, even like 10 years(?) ago it was thought of as a country that didn't let immigrants in, now it's almost Canada levels of cucking, per capita.
I’m assuming Australia has the same loopholes Canada does both being a commonwealth country and all. Indians and Chinese can either buy real estate or a business and get in that way. Another big one the Indians rort is the education system. They pick a bullchit 4 year degree, do the bare minimum study units while working the whole time. Then after 4 years they automatically get permanent residency because they been here 4 years.
 

Beaker

Robin
I’m assuming Australia has the same loopholes Canada does both being a commonwealth country and all. Indians and Chinese can either buy real estate or a business and get in that way. Another big one the Indians rort is the education system. They pick a bullchit 4 year degree, do the bare minimum study units while working the whole time. Then after 4 years they automatically get permanent residency because they been here 4 years.

There is massive corruption in the Canadian government, it otherwise makes no sense that Indians and Chinese make up 80%+ of all the immigrants. Trudeau takes money from Chinese billionaires and he went to India dressed like a clown.

He's for sale and they're the only ones buying.
 

fokker

Pelican
Same thing happened to Australia. In the 60s and early 70s a large amount of British came to Australia either for opportunity or to get away from what the UK was becoming. Guess what they did... if you said vote and act the same way in Australia as they did back home you’d be correct.

Tony Abbott, our last truly-elected Prime Minister, and Julia Gillard, allegedly our "first female PM" (although she had Kevin Rudd, the democratically-elected PM at the time, ousted, he later returned to pave way for Abbott), both came to Australia from the UK, on the "Ten-Pound Pom" program.
 

fokker

Pelican
I’m assuming Australia has the same loopholes Canada does both being a commonwealth country and all. Indians and Chinese can either buy real estate or a business and get in that way. Another big one the Indians rort is the education system. They pick a bullchit 4 year degree, do the bare minimum study units while working the whole time. Then after 4 years they automatically get permanent residency because they been here 4 years.

What interest do the Chinese have in Canada? I understand the Indian interest in both CA and AU (all 3 countries are part of the Commonwealth), and China and Australia are geographically in close proximity.
 
What interest do the Chinese have in Canada? I understand the Indian interest in both CA and AU (all 3 countries are part of the Commonwealth), and China and Australia are geographically in close proximity.

Hong Kong paved the road into Canada through the commonwealth back in the 80s/90s. Now it’s like Australia, somewhere for rich Chinese to park their dirty money away from the CCP and the CCP indirectly playing the long game.

There is massive corruption in the Canadian government, it otherwise makes no sense that Indians and Chinese make up 80%+ of all the immigrants. Trudeau takes money from Chinese billionaires and he went to India dressed like a clown.

He's for sale and they're the only ones buying.

Yep exactly the same here. All the politicians have investment properties and ties to banks/corporations (they are all bankers of lawyers by trade) they benefit greatly by keeping the real estate ponzi scheme going.

Not to totally hi jack this thread. Australia was declared DOA in 1972 when Whitlam signed us up to the Lima declaration. Since then it’s been a downward spiral into a banana republic that sells resources, real estate and lattes.
 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
What interest do the Chinese have in Canada? I understand the Indian interest in both CA and AU (all 3 countries are part of the Commonwealth), and China and Australia are geographically in close proximity.
The Chinese want to move their money to someplace the Chinese government can't touch it. That's why they buy up real estate in Canada, Singapore, Australia, etc.


...and haha - I remember streaking in the early 70s too! Every once in a while some hippie loser would run naked out into the field during a football game and have to get tackled.
 
...and haha - I remember streaking in the early 70s too! Every once in a while some hippie loser would run naked out into the field during a football game and have to get tackled.

I’m only 35 but old enough to remember a lot of things that have been memory holed.
Like people playing on the field after major sporting events. Farmers owning dynamite to clear rocks from their farms. Riding in the back of pickups and trailers.

Be interesting to hear from older members about the freedoms they used to enjoy that have been totally memory holed.
 

Blitz

Sparrow
What interest do the Chinese have in Canada? I understand the Indian interest in both CA and AU (all 3 countries are part of the Commonwealth), and China and Australia are geographically in close proximity.

Laundering money, lebensraum, avenging the Century of Humiliation from the Brits, laundering money, entry port into the US, securing resources, farmland, laundering money
 

ralfy

Sparrow
Worldwide, those years included the rise of national democratic fronts against imperialists in Third World countries. It was also the time when there was growing awareness of limits to growth and environmental damage on a global scale, as well as the beginnings of major studies into global warming.
 

Max Roscoe

Kingfisher
I find the fourth turning stuff incredibly fascinating. It's also referred to as Elliott Wave Theory. I remember Gerald Celente making some predictions based on this model several years back, and he predicted that the *musical* was going to make a comeback in Hollywood. I laughed, but then we saw Moulin Rouge, High School Musical, Glee, Hamilton, Mamma Mia, Pitch Perfect, Les Mis, Dreamgirls (I liked that one) etc.

Robert Prechter is a financial analyst that looks at societal trends, fashion trends, etc. and makes financial predictions off it. There is definately something to the generational theory. The most recent predictions I read from about a decade ago were that we would see lack of faith in our institutions, a desire for more societal power versus individual, and a dislike of the Fox News "yelling voices on tv" type of news. This all wildly came true.

I found this article where someone used Prechter's theory to predict a low chance of Trump winning re-election. Certainly from the fact that he is a divisive leader, and often speaks about "Democrat states" instead of leading and uniting the entire country, makes him far less acceptable to the younger generation, who is in the "fourth turning." I put less faith in this today, as the stock market means less and less to average Americans than it ever has, but it still has some merit.

 
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