Organic food

powerline

Newbie
"Organic" in my experience means almost nothing except a higher price especially at chain grocery stores. You are far better off going to a farmers market and meeting farmers who put in the work to raise natural crops and livestock. Personally i love EatWild. Its hleps find farms near you that are usually family run and produce very fine food. Most farms on there invite you to come visit and see how the food is raised yourself. Its an invaluable resource and can also help in getting raw milk if thats something you're interested in. Will link below.
 
Disclaimer: I am a farmer who does certified organic production, according to the EU standard; I think other standards are mostly similar (if not outright interchangeable), but I can only claim to know about the EU one.

OK, right off the bat: the organic standard is not a management standard, but rather a production standard; what this means is that it won't give you any assurance regarding the methods used during the farming of the product you are buying/consuming. What it does is give you an assurance that the product complies with a set of rules, most of which are negative: don't use synthesized chemicals; don't use growth hormones; don't abuse fertilizers; don't use sludge; and so on.

This does lend itself to confusion. Imagine the subject of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides: yes, you can use products that serve this purpose; but 1) they must be approved to use in organic production 2) the amounts you can use are strictly regulated. It's true, you can use copper, or tea tree extract, or rotenone, or..; but for sure you won't (or you shouldn't) find traces of any of things like DDAC, glyphosates, etc. For many cultures, you need the help of those fungicides or pesticides to have a viable yield during your production cycle. In any case, every year I submit my products to a battery of tests to detect for more than 350 substances, and they always come with a clean bill of health.

The organic mode of production is a necessary condition for a sustainable agriculture, but it's by no means sufficient. At the very least, something like the implementation of a GlobalGAP (which is a management standard for farms/agriculture) system is also a sine-qua-non condition for it. But, ultimately, knowing from whom you're buying from should be the litmus test of whether something was done properly or not.
 
After looking into some Producers with "Organic" claims, I sometimes wonder if "Organic" simply means a bunch of hippies work the conveyor belts.


The best food is always whole, grown yourself. But whether you grow it yourself, or not, the following has served me well:

-The less processed, the better.
-'Fresh', no cans, wherever possible.
-If it's in a box, don't eat it.

-Do not consume raw vegetables.
-Steam-cook your vegetables.
-Grass fed, grass finished meat.
-No microwaves.
-Himalayan salt (none of that iodized white crap).
-Raw milk, keifer, and cheese (where legal).
-Try to avoid freezing food.
-Cook each meal for each day, on that day; try not to have leftovers that require refrigeration.
-Local markets usually superior to grocery chains.
-Share some of Bucky's tasty home-cooking with roosh v forum 'friends'.*

*optional.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
I heard it can depend on the food. For example it's OK to eat non-organic Bananas, Oranges and Lemons, because of the thick skin protects the flesh.

No idea if this is true or not. Does make sense for sprayed on chemicals, but not those used in soil.
 
You're saying it is allowed to put this on crops ?
don't use sludge; and so on.
:hmm:

I heard it can depend on the food. For example it's OK to eat non-organic Bananas, Oranges and Lemons, because of the thick skin protects the flesh.

No idea if this is true or not. Does make sense for sprayed on chemicals, but not those used in soil.
It's true that skin offers a layer of protection - and, regardless, most countries that I know of have "safety intervals" for pesticide applications, meaning you can't apply them if you're X days away from harvest, anyway. But that doesn't help with the multitude of other products that can still be present in the plant's sap and might go in to the produce.
 

Oberrheiner

Pelican
Yeah ok sorry, maybe my written comprehension is not that great. I understood the following :

OK, right off the bat: the organic standard is not a management standard, but rather a production standard; what this means is that it won't give you any assurance regarding the methods used during the farming of the product you are buying/consuming. What it does is give you an assurance that the product complies with a set of rules, most of which are negative: don't use synthesized chemicals; don't use growth hormones; don't abuse fertilizers; don't use sludge; and so on.
to also imply the opposite, meaning that synthesized chemicals, growth hormones, fertilizer abuse and sludge can indeed be used when growing non-organic food.

Asking because if that's the case I'm never buying non-organic vegetables again :)
 

ilostabet

Pelican
Yeah ok sorry, maybe my written comprehension is not that great. I understood the following :



to also imply the opposite, meaning that synthesized chemicals, growth hormones, fertilizer abuse and sludge can indeed be used when growing non-organic food.

Asking because if that's the case I'm never buying non-organic vegetables again :)
Yes, they do allow it for non-org farming. That's why you have stuff like 'tripple wash' on salad greens. And it still spreads e-coli.
 
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