Orthodox Christianity

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Thank you for sharing this video (and subtitles) .

In regard to God, our Creator, and Son of Adam the opening of this video is truthful.
Adam/Man as to human race- male and female.

[People] no longer pray to God; as most societies use to pray and to affirm.
Instead God has been eliminated from societies’ morals, values, schools, country; and even food and culture.

[Progressive] culture has contributed to societies’ moral decay.
And current secular-progressive events have revealed a type of darkness seen in [man]’s nature
Elder wisdom. Appreciate the message in this video.
I too "have hope that I will be with Him forever" in His Kingdom.


Let us pray for man during these transitional times.
Bless you DMM.

 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox Christianity reject the infallibility of the pope, as where Catholicism Christianity gives power to the pope in matters of doctrine.
Observation: This is one reason why Orthodox Christianity, in terms of religion (man-made), may be more appealing as a spiritual path for those not finding individual values aligned with Catholicism.

The pope is not a "de jure leader of the entire church." Why should the pope even be considered at such a level?

The Schism of 1054
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
Reading "Our Thoughts Determine Our Lives" The Life and Teachings of Elder Thaddeus of Vitovnica. This is my second time reading it. I believe there is something for everyone in this book. The first 50 pages are about his life, then it goes through his teachings and wisdom on a variety of topics: our thoughts, family life, humility, serving God and neighbor, monasticism, repentance, prayer, love, the fallen world, spiritual struggle, the faith, inner peace, and the spiritual realm. Then one of his homilies, chapter on repentance, and a collection of his sayings.
 

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Hi all,

Recently I have joined a Bible study group, and as an Orthodox Christian, I am not sure on whether some of the things mentioned in the Bible study are what I should be learning. I am fairly new to the Bible itself, but the facilitator of the group has said she is non-denominational and really emphasizes "according to the scriptures". Is this Sola Scriptura? Why is Orthodoxy opposed to Sola Scriptura? How can I know I am being taught Protestant teachings? I was hoping to find an Orthodox study group, but very difficult to do. The facilitator is very knowledgeable about the Bible, but I am just confused on whether I should continue. I was hoping somebody might have insights? There is also a huge focus on prophecy in the OT etc. She has also been focusing a lot on Isaiah 52:14 and the appearance of Jesus "Just as there were many who were appalled at him -- his appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any human being and his form marred beyond human likeness".

Something just doesn't feel right!
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Hi all,

Recently I have joined a Bible study group, and as an Orthodox Christian, I am not sure on whether some of the things mentioned in the Bible study are what I should be learning. I am fairly new to the Bible itself, but the facilitator of the group has said she is non-denominational and really emphasizes "according to the scriptures". Is this Sola Scriptura? Why is Orthodoxy opposed to Sola Scriptura? How can I know I am being taught Protestant teachings? I was hoping to find an Orthodox study group, but very difficult to do. The facilitator is very knowledgeable about the Bible, but I am just confused on whether I should continue. I was hoping somebody might have insights? There is also a huge focus on prophecy in the OT etc. She has also been focusing a lot on Isaiah 52:14 and the appearance of Jesus "Just as there were many who were appalled at him -- his appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any human being and his form marred beyond human likeness".

Something just doesn't feel right!

This is one of the reasons why I struggle with religion.

There was a lady I worked with, she is a deacon within Seventh Day Adventist, and I loved talking to her about scriptures because she was very knowledgeable. Now I understand, Sola Scripture as Protestant teachings, and it explains the heavy on scriptures and how women can be deacons as Adventists. But Adventists recognize Sabbath starting on Friday and ending Saturday, as where, Protestants are Sunday.

Wonder what day of the week does this non-denominational Bible study facilitator recognize as the Sabbath?
 
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Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
but the facilitator of the group has said she is non-denominational and really emphasizes "according to the scriptures". Is this Sola Scriptura? Why is Orthodoxy opposed to Sola Scriptura?
Yes, she is operating from a Sola scriptura viewpoint. You can read the problems of sola scriptura here: http://orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/tca_solascriptura.aspx
How can I know I am being taught Protestant teachings?
You currently are.
I was hoping to find an Orthodox study group, but very difficult to do. The facilitator is very knowledgeable about the Bible, but I am just confused on whether I should continue. I was hoping somebody might have insights? There is also a huge focus on prophecy in the OT etc. She has also been focusing a lot on Isaiah 52:14 and the appearance of Jesus "Just as there were many who were appalled at him -- his appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any human being and his form marred beyond human likeness".

Something just doesn't feel right!
If you can't find an Orthodox Bible group then God does not currently want you in a Bible group. Unless you have the blessing of your priest, I would stay away from non-Orthodox teachings.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
Hi all,

Recently I have joined a Bible study group, and as an Orthodox Christian, I am not sure on whether some of the things mentioned in the Bible study are what I should be learning. I am fairly new to the Bible itself, but the facilitator of the group has said she is non-denominational and really emphasizes "according to the scriptures". Is this Sola Scriptura? Why is Orthodoxy opposed to Sola Scriptura? How can I know I am being taught Protestant teachings? I was hoping to find an Orthodox study group, but very difficult to do. The facilitator is very knowledgeable about the Bible, but I am just confused on whether I should continue. I was hoping somebody might have insights? There is also a huge focus on prophecy in the OT etc. She has also been focusing a lot on Isaiah 52:14 and the appearance of Jesus "Just as there were many who were appalled at him -- his appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any human being and his form marred beyond human likeness".

Something just doesn't feel right!
In addition to what Roosh said, it's worth pointing out that the Orthodox love and tremendously value scripture and don't downplay its importance whatsoever; for instance, you'll hear more scripture in a single Orthodox service than in many weeks at most protestant churches.

But in Orthodoxy, Scripture is perceived as being a part of the broader tradition the Church, wherein the collective body of interpretation (mainly through the Church Fathers of the first millennium) provides continuity how we understand the Scriptures. The problem with Sola Scriptura is that it essentially throws out this continuity and starts over from scratch, as if the Church never existed and the Bible was excavated from the earth like dinosaur bones, to be re-assembled and re-interpreted by academic experts (or, in much of evangelicalism, by absolutely anyone, no qualifications of any sort required.)

This is very different from in many veins of protestantism, where your own subjective impressions from reading the text at face value are emphasized, making total misunderstanding or misinterpretation rampant; or the teachers drawn upon for understanding are almost entirely recent ones like John Piper, who don't really have a connection to any Christian tradition older than Martin Luther. As a result, your protestant Bible study is going to be interpreting many things quite out of sync with the Orthodox understanding, and it's likely to be counterproductive, at best.

I'd suggest going to services at an Orthodox parish, and studying yourself from the Orthodox Study Bible. While the OSB has its critics, it's a good resource, especially for a newcomer, to understand the Bible correctly from an Orthodox worldview. I'd try emailing Orthodox parishes in your area and asking them if they have any Bible studies you could attend.
 

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
In addition to what Roosh said, it's worth pointing out that the Orthodox love and tremendously value scripture and don't downplay its importance whatsoever; for instance, you'll hear more scripture in a single Orthodox service than in many weeks at most protestant churches.

But in Orthodoxy, Scripture is perceived as being a part of the broader tradition the Church, wherein the collective body of interpretation (mainly through the Church Fathers of the first millennium) provides continuity how we understand the Scriptures. The problem with Sola Scriptura is that it essentially throws out this continuity and starts over from scratch, as if the Church never existed and the Bible was excavated from the earth like dinosaur bones, to be re-assembled and re-interpreted by academic experts (or, in much of evangelicalism, by absolutely anyone, no qualifications of any sort required.)

This is very different from in many veins of protestantism, where your own subjective impressions from reading the text at face value are emphasized, making total misunderstanding or misinterpretation rampant; or the teachers drawn upon for understanding are almost entirely recent ones like John Piper, who don't really have a connection to any Christian tradition older than Martin Luther. As a result, your protestant Bible study is going to be interpreting many things quite out of sync with the Orthodox understanding, and it's likely to be counterproductive, at best.

I'd suggest going to services at an Orthodox parish, and studying yourself from the Orthodox Study Bible. While the OSB has its critics, it's a good resource, especially for a newcomer, to understand the Bible correctly from an Orthodox worldview. I'd try emailing Orthodox parishes in your area and asking them if they have any Bible studies you could attend.
Thank you. I really appreciate this response.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
Hi all,

Recently I have joined a Bible study group, and as an Orthodox Christian, I am not sure on whether some of the things mentioned in the Bible study are what I should be learning. I am fairly new to the Bible itself, but the facilitator of the group has said she is non-denominational and really emphasizes "according to the scriptures". Is this Sola Scriptura? Why is Orthodoxy opposed to Sola Scriptura? How can I know I am being taught Protestant teachings? I was hoping to find an Orthodox study group, but very difficult to do. The facilitator is very knowledgeable about the Bible, but I am just confused on whether I should continue. I was hoping somebody might have insights? There is also a huge focus on prophecy in the OT etc. She has also been focusing a lot on Isaiah 52:14 and the appearance of Jesus "Just as there were many who were appalled at him -- his appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any human being and his form marred beyond human likeness".

Something just doesn't feel right!
I recommend getting the Orthodox Study Bible, its footnotes are great. Also the free phone app Catena has thousands upon thousands of commentaries from the Church Fathers, Catholic, Orthodox, pre and post schism (you can pick which, or all if you want). Almost every verse has commentaries in the New Testament, so if you see a verse that is confusing you can tap on it and read commentaries from Saint Augustine, Saint John Chrysostom, and many others.
 

MBell

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox
I am a newcomer to this forum, and I wanted to say that I am impressed by the knowledge and guidance here, especially regarding the nuances of Orthodoxy. I have been faced with criticism about my adherence to Orthodox teachings from some of my relatives who are Protestants and Catholics, and the resources here are very helpful. Thank you!
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
I'm currently reading The Life of Saint Luke Archbishop of Simferopol. Fascinating book of a "modern" saint and his endurance through persecution. Saint Luke condemned the various schisms of the Orthodox Church under communist rule. As an American with Ukrainian heritage, I see the Russia-Ukraine issue as (mainly) a political problem. I do recognize the canonical issues, but there are ways to reconcile those issues. I don't see this issue as worth creating a new schism. It isn't just an issue between Russia and Constantinople because if they split, all other Orthodox jurisdictions will have to pick a side. I have attended many jurisdictions of Orthodox churches over the years, and they all have such beautiful heritage and history. I love the overall unity of the Church. I can't imagine having to "pick a side" if that's what it comes down to. And what that would mean for Orthodoxy in America since we are not unified. It would certainly crush any possibility of us unifying in the future. When I was in college i had the hope that there would be a unified Orthodox Church in America instead of all the jurisdictions (which I believe hurts our ability to evangelize and deters converts). What do you think? Lord have mercy.
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
@DanielH (@Mrs.DanielH ) in another thread (men's forum) you stated the following, could you please expand upon this concept. It helps to see the differences between Catholicism and Orthodox:

In addition to the filioque and papal supremacy there's also the matter of the immaculate conception which stems from differences in original sin theology. For us Orthodox the immaculate conception is an error built upon an error.

Any guidance is appreciated.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
@DanielH (@Mrs.DanielH ) in another thread (men's forum) you stated the following, could you please expand upon this concept. It helps to see the differences between Catholicism and Orthodox:



Any guidance is appreciated.
I don't like speaking for Catholics but they believe we inherit the guilt for Adam and Eve's sin. Orthodox just believe we inherit the consequences, for example if your dad gambles away your college fund you inherit the consequence of that but not the guilt.

Therefore, in Catholic eyes, Mary had to be made exempt from original sin from the moment of her conception in Anna's womb so that she would be fit to bear God in her womb. The Immaculate Conception of Mary only became dogmatic in 1854* declared by Pope Pius IX in Ineffabilis Deus. This means Mary was formed ontologically different from us, that she didn't have to struggle against sin. For us Orthodox, we view her as someone born just like us who struggled better against temptation than any of us ever have, and that is one of the reasons venerate her, because she shows what we could be.

*The groundwork of the Immaculate conception was laid by St. Augustine around 1500 years prior and was developed after him.

I would argue the Catholic position opens Pandoras box on Calvinism and predetermination, so a Calvinist could have a good argument against Catholicism without realizing the Orthodox position ever existed.

For a more thorough explanation of the difference between the Orthodox and Catholic positions I recommend “Byzantine Theology” by Fr John Meyendorff. Explains the different philosophical mindsets of the West and East. In short despite the East containing Greece, the East largely rejected any influence of the Greek philosophers on theology as it appeared every heresy stemmed from it, and the West, through St. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas largely embraced Aristotle, who is not without merit.
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholics but they believe we inherit the guilt for Adam and Eve's sin. Orthodox just believe we inherit the consequences, for example if your dad gambles away your college fund you inherit the consequence of that but not the guilt.

Yes. Growing up Catholic there was this overhanging of sin - Catholic guilt. Over time I learned the concept Orthodox Christians teach, as you stated. Not sure what denomination of Christianity I was listening to, but original sin was described as a taint/imprecation - Because of Adam and Eve's actions following Satan humanity is now tainted.

or us Orthodox, we view her as someone born just like us who struggled better against temptation than any of us ever have, and that is one of the reasons venerate her, because she shows what we could be.

So in the eyes of orthodox did Mary ever sin?

I will be looking to read your suggestion. Thank you for your time on this request.
 
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