Holy Days Orthodox Lent 2021

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I'm having a difficult time navigating this from "being faithful" (you all know I talk about faithfulness a lot) point of view. My area is awful (gonna move), the churches have priests who are holy people but feel cornered or have no desire to stand up to the % of crazies for whom after a year it is clear no action will ever be enough, and even when I can go to services that are orthodox (I do) I am a sort of outsider (which I don't totally mind, but it feels so transient and less community). The evil one is everywhere and I sense more than ever the atomization of modern life. I don't want to make excuses, so I'll keep struggling, but I have to convey this if not just to stay healthy. It's pretty sad to know a part of you is incomplete, but perhaps the routine and cookie cutter attendance and obedience I was used to was something I took for granted; it seems at least partially true that that was the case.
What is the specific problem? Lack of faith around you?
 

LightofApollo

 
Banned
Woman
I'm having a difficult time navigating this from "being faithful" (you all know I talk about faithfulness a lot) point of view. My area is awful (gonna move), the churches have priests who are holy people but feel cornered or have no desire to stand up to the % of crazies for whom after a year it is clear no action will ever be enough, and even when I can go to services that are orthodox (I do) I am a sort of outsider (which I don't totally mind, but it feels so transient and less community). The evil one is everywhere and I sense more than ever the atomization of modern life. I don't want to make excuses, so I'll keep struggling, but I have to convey this if not just to stay healthy. It's pretty sad to know a part of you is incomplete, but perhaps the routine and cookie cutter attendance and obedience I was used to was something I took for granted; it seems at least partially true that that was the case.
The stench of atomization is in every breath we draw. The priests are hobbled right now, both by the politically expedient bishops and the secular-adjacent laity. I haven't been to Church in over a year because I can't stomach my Church's cucking, of which said cuckery is clearly the fault of the bishops. The virtue-signaling Karens have a problem with skipping church, but you know who doesn't? My based priest who told me to go to the desert until the madness passes. The current state of Christianity is feminine and useless, Orthodox laity included. Unless one begins emulating the manliness of the monks and the saints, their Christianity is feckless.
 

Blade Runner

Hummingbird
Orthodox
What is the specific problem? Lack of faith around you?
Partially the geographic location I'm in, partially the difficulty in solidly getting into a routine being an outsider at ethnic churches that are a bit harder to "break into" as an outsider (I have no problem with this, just stating it), and perhaps just feeling disappointed in the way a lot of the jurisdictions have limited or bastardized the sacraments. I make no excuses; just stating that all of these distract from the larger act of attendance, obedience, and encountering the sacraments properly.
 

Blade Runner

Hummingbird
Orthodox
The virtue-signaling Karens have a problem with skipping church, but you know who doesn't? My based priest who told me to go to the desert until the madness passes.
That's sorta what I'm getting. It's such a change that although I think it might be good (suffering and confusion may bring greater light in time) eventually, for now I'm experiencing what I consider to be bizarre lenten journeys where I feel more sinful less reverent (much harder to even participate like I always used to presanctified liturgies, etc) and at the same time, am saddened by the madness possibly not ending just like I told all of these people. This is just my personal point of view - I'm also so disappointed secularly I want to get the heck out of my current location so all worlds are colliding. It's not a big deal and I don't perseverate on it or feel anxious, it's just weird, since so few people (5%) I talk to or have something in common with, even see it the same way I do.
 

LightofApollo

 
Banned
Woman
suffering and confusion may bring greater light in time) eventually, for now I'm experiencing what I consider to be bizarre lenten journeys where I feel more sinful less reverent (much harder to even participate like I always used to presanctified liturgies, etc) and at the same time, am saddened by the madness possibly not ending just like I told all of these people.
Your mind is right with our Lord. I can tell these things. You recognize the value of pain, in its ability to purify you. Your bizarre lenten journeys sound like a recovery from prelest, which is the chief sickness of our day. Essentially, it is easy to fall into a false religion that demands of you a higher mode of behavior than what God has in mind for you. This behavior is identical to the one that is destroying the Lunatic Left at the moment, caught as they are in their purity spiral of death. Our Lord humbles us. He's giving you the sinful sack you're meant to carry. He's showing you how filthy your own garments are. Orthodoxy rejects the haughty publican. We are the sinners who beat our chests until our final breath.
And finally, it sounds like you have been bridled with the sorrow of the saints. I am very sorry to hear this. You will never be relieved of that burden. People will tell you that despair is a sin, and it is, and they'll advise you to get rid of it, but these poor folk can't differentiate between despair and sorrow, in much the same way that envy and avarice are synonyms to the dullards. A saint can lay down his sorrow the day a man can lay down his shadow.

Long-suffering, faithfulness, and love. All fruits of His Spirit. Good luck, because that 5% figure will only continue to dwindle. God bless.
 

Providence76

Pigeon
Orthodox
Today, my department at work was having a going-away lunch for a co-worker who is moving on. They ordered pizza, and a couple of days ago, I let my boss know that I wouldn't be having pizza, but that it was fine. He said he'd order salad instead. I said that was very nice and that I appreciated the gesture.

The salad had cheese and ham on it, with Italian dressing. I quietly ate it and thanked him afterwards. I didn't know what else to do.
 
Today, my department at work was having a going-away lunch for a co-worker who is moving on. They ordered pizza, and a couple of days ago, I let my boss know that I wouldn't be having pizza, but that it was fine. He said he'd order salad instead. I said that was very nice and that I appreciated the gesture.

The salad had cheese and ham on it, with Italian dressing. I quietly ate it and thanked him afterwards. I didn't know what else to do.

You did the right thing by eating it. As Christ told the Apostles before he sent them out, "Eat whatever is set before you."

Many years ago I went to visit my (non-Orthodox) grandparents on Good Friday once while I was on leave from the military. My grandpa was out shopping and my grandma called to tell him I was there. He showed up a few minutes later with a hamburger he'd bought me from Burger King. I was only recently chrismated, and very concerned with the letter of the law. But I knew that buying me that burger was a big deal for my grandparents, and it would be sinful to refuse it. I can't stand Burger King, so I thanked him, choked it down, and pretended to enjoy it.

When I told my priest about it he started laughing and said "You did the right thing, don't refuse hospitality." Fasting is there to remind you that your food is a gift from God and to teach you self-restraint; letting your fast become a difficulty for people around you is the vegan SJW way, not the Christian way.
 

Providence76

Pigeon
Orthodox
You did the right thing by eating it. As Christ told the Apostles before he sent them out, "Eat whatever is set before you."

Many years ago I went to visit my (non-Orthodox) grandparents on Good Friday once while I was on leave from the military. My grandpa was out shopping and my grandma called to tell him I was there. He showed up a few minutes later with a hamburger he'd bought me from Burger King. I was only recently chrismated, and very concerned with the letter of the law. But I knew that buying me that burger was a big deal for my grandparents, and it would be sinful to refuse it. I can't stand Burger King, so I thanked him, choked it down, and pretended to enjoy it.

When I told my priest about it he started laughing and said "You did the right thing, don't refuse hospitality." Fasting is there to remind you that your food is a gift from God and to teach you self-restraint; letting your fast become a difficulty for people around you is the vegan SJW way, not the Christian way.
Thanks for the kind and thoughtful response.
 

tractor

Woodpecker
Orthodox
it's ten days... what do you want to eat on May 2?

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