Other Orthodox Lounge Thread

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
My wife and I have been struggling to choose Godparents for our son. There just aren't that many married Orthodox we know who take the faith seriously and who have had good judgment in our times. There is one couple with children middle school and high school aged we decided to ask. We knew them from church but not extremely well, only meeting them in the past year, so they asked us to visit them so we could get to know each other better. They're still hesitant to say yes after that meeting but it was an enlightening experience to see what an Orthodox family looks like. I learned that the father disobeyed the Church authorities including our priest and continued going to Church during the lockdown, basically implied he would have to be arrested. He commented that the whole Church should have refused the leaders of our Church and gone anyways -this was after I criticized the leaders, so he turned it on me, saying I should have gone, but in a nice way. Very true and humbling! Who am I to make such a comment? I am no better than them.

Found out that they have already refused several people who wanted them to be Godparents because they didn't think the people asking took it seriously enough.

The mother stayed at home for many years after the children were born and now only works a few hours a week. The children are homeschooled though they do have some online classes, much much less on an hourly basis than actually going to school. They remarked that society is too corrupted to let your children be overly involved with it nowadays. Even group sports were no good they said, as how can you take your children to evening vespers or the Lenten services if they're in a group sport?

They stated that it is very important to teach your children obedience. They once gave their children some soup for dinner and the one daughter refused to have it so the father said "that's alright, you'll have it the next meal." That went on for quite a few meals until she finally did eat it and then there were never any problems after that. Children are also served last and they are never asked what they want. The children do not have internet on their phones and the family doesn't have a television. One of the daughters is now reading "Spiritual Warfare" by Saint Theophan the Recluse.

And get this - most of the family actually sleeps on boards with a thin mattress pad over it. They showed us the beds, and the beds are in fact hard, but it is apparently good for the back and you get used to it.

The family also has chickens and a garden. Suffice it to say they seem like a very saintly family. It was inspiring to see that you can live that life and have a saintly family in the midst of our metropolitan area so at least if they say no (praying they say yes), I learned a lot about how to be an Orthodox parent.
Fr. Josiah did have a video on this topic recently...

 

Pantheon

Robin
Orthodox
As I'm in the process of becoming a catechumen I wonder how do you guys deal with family members or friends who are not of the faith, let's say secular? As you grow in the faith and you understand the truth of it deeper and deeper including the consequences for eternal life in heaven and hell, I can imagine an increasingly stark need and urgency to bring these people to Christ. I can imagine this for example with my mother who was raised somewhat Catholic but isn't religious, plus quite attached to worldly pleasures and comfort. How to go about that? You can't make the horse drink after all and people without your experience will very unlikely be persuaded.
Well, the Protestant-evangelical method would be to try to convince or entice them to become Christians, as if it were just an outer process of signing a life insurance or joining a club. I would say focus on your faith, pray and trust that your family is in God's hands. We can't do anything for anyone. As an Orthodox, there is no point knocking other people's doors with a bible or writing Jesus loves you stickers. Our Church is mystical and will attract those who are mature to respond on an inner level. What we can do is to be good exemplars. God will do the rest. If you trust yourself, you don't have to "try" to make people like you. The same is with the Orthodox Church, she already is the real Church and people who recognize it will come to her.
 

Muscovite

Robin
Other Christian
Patristic Nectar have just released a new audiobook called "The Divine Identity of Christ". It's a seven part series that's officially available to download for free until March 20th. Then it will cost $20.

 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
My wife and I have been struggling to choose Godparents for our son. There just aren't that many married Orthodox we know who take the faith seriously and who have had good judgment in our times. There is one couple with children middle school and high school aged we decided to ask. We knew them from church but not extremely well, only meeting them in the past year, so they asked us to visit them so we could get to know each other better. They're still hesitant to say yes after that meeting but it was an enlightening experience to see what an Orthodox family looks like. I learned that the father disobeyed the Church authorities including our priest and continued going to Church during the lockdown, basically implied he would have to be arrested. He commented that the whole Church should have refused the leaders of our Church and gone anyways -this was after I criticized the leaders, so he turned it on me, saying I should have gone, but in a nice way. Very true and humbling! Who am I to make such a comment? I am no better than them.

Found out that they have already refused several people who wanted them to be Godparents because they didn't think the people asking took it seriously enough.

The mother stayed at home for many years after the children were born and now only works a few hours a week. The children are homeschooled though they do have some online classes, much much less on an hourly basis than actually going to school. They remarked that society is too corrupted to let your children be overly involved with it nowadays. Even group sports were no good they said, as how can you take your children to evening vespers or the Lenten services if they're in a group sport?

They stated that it is very important to teach your children obedience. They once gave their children some soup for dinner and the one daughter refused to have it so the father said "that's alright, you'll have it the next meal." That went on for quite a few meals until she finally did eat it and then there were never any problems after that. Children are also served last and they are never asked what they want. The children do not have internet on their phones and the family doesn't have a television. One of the daughters is now reading "Spiritual Warfare" by Saint Theophan the Recluse.

And get this - most of the family actually sleeps on boards with a thin mattress pad over it. They showed us the beds, and the beds are in fact hard, but it is apparently good for the back and you get used to it.

The family also has chickens and a garden. Suffice it to say they seem like a very saintly family. It was inspiring to see that you can live that life and have a saintly family in the midst of our metropolitan area so at least if they say no (praying they say yes), I learned a lot about how to be an Orthodox parent.
That's a great story. They are around, but you have to know your ways and look around carefully to spot them.
I've never interacted with him before yet I'm blocked.

View attachment 39085
The Russian-Orthodox church I'm inquiring has made national headlines in the last days, as they didn't accept the Moscow patriarch stance on the Ukraine-Russian situation. Now apparantly they've come into conflict with the Archbishop, as they were reprimanded. Now they're looking into moving over to the Constantinople patriarchate. What I gather is that the Constantinople patriarchate has been in conflict with the Russian Orthodox Church in the last years, also by recognizing the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. Can someone elaborate a bit on that and what this move would mean?
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
That's a great story. They are around, but you have to know your ways and look around carefully to spot them.
Thank you!
The Russian-Orthodox church I'm inquiring has made national headlines in the last days, as they didn't accept the Moscow patriarch stance on the Ukraine-Russian situation. Now apparantly they've come into conflict with the Archbishop, as they were reprimanded. Now they're looking into moving over to the Constantinople patriarchate. What I gather is that the Constantinople patriarchate has been in conflict with the Russian Orthodox Church in the last years, also by recognizing the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. Can someone elaborate a bit on that and what this move would mean?
I'm not sure if you mean the priest or the parish council or both. A priest flat-out cannot leave his bishop without his approval for another jurisdiction except in cases of heresy. It is so wildly uncanonical for a priest to leave a jurisdiction because of what secular world leaders are doing. And especially siding with the Jewish GAE puppet who has been shelling civilians in the Donbass for years. What this means for you, I don't know and I don't want to give you that kind of advice but I can guess what other members here would say.

For some more background, the so called OCU was a schismatic group that the entire Orthodox world recognized as schismatic. They were expelled from the Church, and demoted to laymen, or really less than laity. Those laymen in costumes then "consecrated" new "bishops" who make up their current structure. Patriarch Bartholomew with a stroke of a pen, recognized them as no longer being schismatic and in fact the official Church of Ukraine. Did any of them repent? Were hands laid on any of them by valid Orthodox bishops? Not to my understanding. They are also a minority of Orthodox, more are in the UOC-MP, but the OCU has state backing (being extremely nationalistic) and has been confiscating UOC parishes and there has been lots of violence between the two. Frankly there can be no justification for what the EP did in Ukraine.
 

Stoyan

 
Banned
Orthodox
Allegedly some well known icons have started bleeding now, can anyone confirm? Is this real? Is it a sign from God? Hard to tell these days, what is real and what is fake. The comments in the video are interesting. I cannot post to the "Spiritual dimensions of the war and signs of God's hand".



 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I am currently reading Mystical Marriage: Spiritual Life According to St. Maximos the Confessor, a series of talks given by the Athonite Elder Aimilianos. I'm one chapter in and I already feel like a complete beginner again, the Elder does a fantastic job making the top-tier work of St. Maximos easily accessible through his wisdom and communication skills. It's already a contender for my Book of the Year 2022 (last year's was Saint of the Prisons by Monk Moise).
 

nagareboshi

Kingfisher
Orthodox
In the context of spiritual warfare and anti-materialism, I’ve recently taken the position that hardly anyone makes up a total fabrication ex nihilo. By this, I mean that false witness to visions and spiritual phenomena will fall apart in history through repeated questioning, inconsistency, or unwillingness to suffer persecution for that which was seen.

The Jews never said “Jesus doesn’t exist,” because they knew that such a thesis would be laughable. Instead, they accused Jesus of being a sorcerer and magician, which actually testifies to our atheist friends that Jesus performed genuine spiritual works.
From this, following reasonable principles, I conclude that if the Greeks saw visions of Zeus, they must have been real, but it came from the demons.

The whole concept of “mass hallucination” that secularists push is actually so dumb and unbelievable when you think about it. It’s predicated on a Darwinian model of sense perception. But the Orthodox know that man was created good and is able to see the external world with his senses. Ultimately, the true stories of the fallen angels, documented in ancient and modern times, do not testify against the Orthodox Faith but actually confirm it.
 

Yeagerist

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
From this, following reasonable principles, I conclude that if the Greeks saw visions of Zeus, they must have been real, but it came from the demons.
That really puts the burden on neo-pagans to prove that their old gods exist, otherwise they're just atheist nationalists or cultural chauvinists. Or if they do, they're usually just another occult group.
 

Knight.of.Logos

Woodpecker
Orthodox
I opened a new PDF books subforum: https://www.rooshvforum.com/forums/pdf-books.60/

You can find the link underneath the main Orthodox listing:

View attachment 39188

If you have any worthy PDFs on your hard drive, please share.
Just started the Orthodox Survival Course. I have been wanting to read this for a while now.

The title had me expecting something different, but so far I can tell it is a paradigm-shifting, important book. It is a shame that it has not been properly published, since I would like to buy a proper copy. Thank God it has been preserved the way it has been.
 

Carter Brink

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Hi all

I was wondering if anyone can recommend the most beginner friendly (and enjoyable to read) book for someone just starting out. I am very familiar with the bible as I was raised Jehovah's Witness. But I'd love to learn more about the martyrs and saints as I know nothing about them. Someone at the Orthodox chapel I've started visiting recommended The Mountain of Silence.
 
Last edited:

Knight.of.Logos

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Hi all

I was wondering if anyone can recommend the most beginner friendly (and enjoyable to read) book for someone just starting out. I am very familiar with the bible as I was raised Jehovah's Witness. But I'd love to learn more about the martyrs and saints as I know nothing about them. Someone at the Orthodox chapel I've started visiting recommended The Mountain of Silence.
For life of saints the Prologue of Ohrid is good, but it is pricey. You could also get the Synaxarion, which I believe is 7 volumes, but that is even more pricey. Lastly, there is the Orthodox Calendar app if you have a smart phone, which is good and free but obviously not as good as having the books.

I like St. Theophan's books a lot. I think "The Spiritual Life" is probably good for beginners and "Unseen Warfare" is also great. "The Law of God" by Daniel Sysoev is a good book for inquirers and catechumen, as it covers many different topics related to Orthodox Christianity and is intended for beginners.
 
Top