Other Orthodox Lounge Thread

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Hi all

I was wondering if anyone can recommend the most beginner friendly (and enjoyable to read) book for someone just starting out. I am very familiar with the bible as I was raised Jehovah's Witness. But I'd love to learn more about the martyrs and saints as I know nothing about them. Someone at the Orthodox chapel I've started visiting recommended The Mountain of Silence.
The Orthodox Way. Nihilism from fr Rose is a good reflection on society.
 

Yeagerist

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
I've noticed that the majority of the ideological content on the media, pop culture (music, films, TV shows), the public schools and the academe--are all oriented towards a specific demographic which are young liberal women and effeminate men. I feel like everytime I see normie content in social media I'm getting a glimpse into the mind of a white teenage girl living with the comforts of the First World.

Related note, what would such teenage girls with daddy issues who watch TikTok and listen to K-Pop, know about the merits of a monarchical system of government to lead them to conclude it's "sexist" and "racist?" Something was being planted in their minds, and it's not difficult to infer that social media, music and TV are the culprits.

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budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
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Mulato_Man_Gabe

Sparrow
Orthodox
This is a bit too dorky for me to put in the toll houses thread proper, so I'll drop it here: someone decided to develop a board game based on the Orthodox doctrine of Aerial Toll Houses, and part of his intention for the product is missionary in purpose. It's still in development


I must admit, it appeals to my inner nerd. I never thought I would come across such a product. Curious.
 

nagareboshi

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Does anyone know of a good website where one can read an Orthodox Bible for free, in plain HTML format?

I think the so-called “Orthodox Study Bible” in English is copyrighted so it might be hard to find. For me personally, if I want to get a beautiful, online, English-language semi orthodox Bible, I use this one ; it’s based on St Jerome’s Latin translation.
 

nagareboshi

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Some interesting and unexpected Roman Catholic history:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriarch_of_Venice


The creation of new Roman Catholic patriarchates in the 15th century seems to illustrate that back then, the RC’s still had some conception of autocephalous church organization. In contrast, these days, the Pope is a mega bishop and all the bishops of his church are dependent on him; and I don’t think they actually acknowledge patriarchs anymore except as honorary bishops.
 

Akaky Akakievitch

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
Does anyone know of a good website where one can read an Orthodox Bible for free, in plain HTML format?

Simple answer: no.

Complex answer: please read on... :)

Most "Orthodox" bibles remain in the languages of those traditions, as they base their OT on the Septuagint, i.e. Greece, Russia etc.

The NT seems more consistent whichever way due to its more relative origin but there are better and accurate Orthodox translations if you buy NT separate from the OT [here's a great option for a more academic option, Orthodox NT-only (referenced by Fr. Peter Heers of Orthodox Ethos recently): https://churchsupplies.jordanville.org/9780944359174/ ]

Here's (not Heers, lol) the online version of the Orthodox Greek Septuagint/OT: https://www.septuagint.bible# (don't even attempt the auto-translate tool if you don't speak Greek, it's an abomination)

However, I assume you are seeking an English Orthodox Bible... well, if you want the all-round champ... [i.e. OT + NT fully Orthodox in English, online or physical] you'll be hard-pressed for options.

Almost all English Bible translations are translated from the 'Masoretic' texts, which contain hints and distortions of Jewry, sadly. I'm sure you are aware but for others just in case:

In the 2nd century A.D., hundreds of years before the time of the Masoretes, Justin Martyr investigated a number of Old Testament texts in various Jewish synagogues. He ultimately concluded that the Jews who had rejected Christ had also rejected the Septuagint, and were now tampering with the Hebrew Scriptures themselves.

“But I am far from putting reliance in your teachers, who refuse to admit that the interpretation made by the seventy elders [i.e.
the Septuagint] who were with Ptolemy [king] of the Egyptians is a correct one; and they attempt to frame another. And I wish you to observe, that they have altogether taken away many Scriptures from the [Septuagint] translations effected by those seventy elders who were with Ptolemy, and by which this very man who was crucified is proved to have been set forth expressly as God, and man, and as being crucified, and as dying” (~150 A.D., Justin Martyr, Dialogue with Trypho the Jew, Chapter LXXI)

If Justin Martyr’s findings are correct, then it is likely that the Masoretes inherited a Hebrew textual tradition which had already been corrupted with an anti-Christian bias.
SOURCE]

I'd recommend the (printed) Orthodox Study Bible as a foundation, even if it's not the best translation, it is the only complete English bible that bases the OT on the Septuagint while including the NT, and also referencing the Church Fathers in their notes throughout, as far as I know:

UK: https://www.eden.co.uk/bibles/other-bible-translations/the-orthodox-study-bible

US: https://www.thomasnelson.com/9780718003593/the-orthodox-study-bible-hardcover/

Splash out. Surely $50 is worth it for a lifetime hardback physical copy vs awkward free online versions.



Also, study this extensive article for wider context by Fr. John Whiteford:

AN ORTHODOX LOOK AT ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS OF THE BIBLE

+
[here is the Psalter - according to the Septuagint - he references by Michael Asser]




In summary and IMHO...

If you want a convenient English translation, I'd start with the (physical) Orthodox Study Bible (NKJV version, Thomas Nelson) - begin a Bible study. Start reading daily, in the mornings before any work, when your mind is fresh. This is my approach. Make sure to get a notebook and have at it. Once you've conquered that challenge (1-2 years at least - I have a good reading plan if you need it, I'm currently at day 55...) then you can consider other Bibles or versions that suit your fancy. Refer back to the Fr. John Whiteford article above. Also, final point: Print is far better than the screen, in any situation, hands down - especially for Bible study. God bless.
 

iop890

Peacock
Orthodox
Gold Member
The NT seems more consistent whichever way due to its more relative origin but there are better and accurate Orthodox translations if you buy NT separate from the OT [here's a great option for a more academic option, Orthodox NT-only (referenced by Fr. Peter Heers of Orthodox Ethos recently): https://churchsupplies.jordanville.org/9780944359174/ ]

I have this one and love it, the commentary is fantastic. I'm following the Optina plan for readings currently.(1 chapter of the Gospels and 2 chapters of Epistles per day, going to just 1 chapter of Epistles for the last 7 days so that they even out. Takes 89 days for each rotation.)

Have you tried the Eastern Orthodox Bible(EOB)? Its a New Testament only translation from the Greek patriarchal texts. That's the other NT translation I have. I thought it would be a good companion to the somewhat wooden translation of the Orthodox New Testament but despite all the complaints online I don't actually find the ONT to be hard to read. The New Rome Press EOB is very nice though, and I haven't noticed any translation issues.

For OT I have Brenton's, not a fan of the OSB personally.
 

Akaky Akakievitch

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
I have this one and love it, the commentary is fantastic. I'm following the Optina plan for readings currently.(1 chapter of the Gospels and 2 chapters of Epistles per day, going to just 1 chapter of Epistles for the last 7 days so that they even out. Takes 89 days for each rotation.)

Have you tried the Eastern Orthodox Bible(EOB)? Its a New Testament only translation from the Greek patriarchal texts. That's the other NT translation I have. I thought it would be a good companion to the somewhat wooden translation of the Orthodox New Testament but despite all the complaints online I don't actually find the ONT to be hard to read. The New Rome Press EOB is very nice though, and I haven't noticed any translation issues.

For OT I have Brenton's, not a fan of the OSB personally.

Thank you for the recommendations, I've not come across these options. I will make a note of them. Options are definitely limited for English-speaking Orthodox relative to Protestant/Catholic bibles but there's more than I thought which is good.

I'm aware of the Optina plan, right now I'm following the suggested Thomas Nelson OSB reading plan. With it, I'm doing odd days as OT reading, usually a few chapters (Day 1,3,5...), and even days as a single Psalm, several verses of Proverbs + NT reading (2,4,6...) and if I have time I combine both or more into one day. It will take 1-2 years to complete at around 30-60 minutes a day. I miss out on the daily readings this way but if there's time I can try squeeze them in.

I've considered adding a daily study of the complete Synaxarion - Patristic Nectar have a free, professionally-produced audio version available. Each day of the year is an audio recording around 5-20 minutes depending on how many saints are commemorated. It's an excellent resource regardless. Even if you don't have an Orthodox Bible, hearing the lives of the Saints day-by-day will put you in much better stead.


Personally, as an inquirer, the OSB is perfect. There's no other Bible out there that combines easy-to-read Scripture with commentary from the Church Fathers - if there is I'd love to see it. You could do it perhaps with a separate book of commentary or website open while reading Scripture, but the convenience is great. It puts so much into context for me, e.g. the role of Christ in the OT. It's invaluable for starting out, but I understand as you advance through certain stages, you start to discover your own preferences.
 

iop890

Peacock
Orthodox
Gold Member
Yeah I've been neglecting reading the lives of the Saints recently, I used to read them all from an app every day, but lately the other readings have become a bit heavy.

I've been doing the Optina plan but including the ONT commentary in with it for the first cycle and it's sometimes a lot. Depending on the chapter there could be anywhere from one paragraph to twenty pages of commentary to read after. When I finish this and start the next cycle with reading all the commentary I'll ramp up the lives of the Saints again.

Personally, as an inquirer, the OSB is perfect.

This I agree with, I wouldn't tell an inquirer to go buy four books.
 

Akaky Akakievitch

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
Depending on the chapter there could be anywhere from one paragraph to twenty pages of commentary to read after.

I had this issue when initially looking at bible reading plans. The one-year version asks for a lot of time with all the commentary included, and you're taking in big chunks every day. Better for me to adjust the dosage and spread it out. You find what works for you best I suppose. My two-year plan allows time for all the patristic commentary to soak in, although if I combine some days then it'll be more like a year and a half. I do really want to include the lives of the Saints in my routine though, so I'll have to make room for it somewhere.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
I started subscribing to The Orthodox Word last year and the first couple issues I got were only of mild interest, but this one is fantastic: detailed life of St. Jonah of Hankow, a wonderful Saint of fairly recent times. Also has a talk from Fr. Seraphim Rose on Russian literature and a review of The Departure of the Soul by St. Anthony’s Monastery, a very detailed study of Orthodox doctrine of life after death. Looking forward to reading all of this.

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nagareboshi

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I feel like currently the modern west is in such a clown world condition that, when the ant*-christ comes, all he will have to do is to say basic neo-conservative ideas (“There’s only two genders! Make a lot of money and hate your enemies!) in order to win over many Christians. I’ve seen so many conservatives, even Orthodox, share headlines from obvious clown world bait which clearly wasn’t real and was only designed to shift the Overton window, which is accomplished successfully when you share such news.

For this reason I’m not so optimistic, since Orthodox Christianity tends to be a more nuanced faith and frequently at odds with worldly interests; they will try to divide us from modern Christians and it will probably be successful.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Ostrich
Orthodox
I feel like currently the modern west is in such a clown world condition that, when the ant*-christ comes, all he will have to do is to say basic neo-conservative ideas (“There’s only two genders! Make a lot of money and hate your enemies!) in order to win over many Christians. I’ve seen so many conservatives, even Orthodox, share headlines from obvious clown world bait which clearly wasn’t real and was only designed to shift the Overton window, which is accomplished successfully when you share such news.

For this reason I’m not so optimistic, since Orthodox Christianity tends to be a more nuanced faith and frequently at odds with worldly interests; they will try to divide us from modern Christians and it will probably be successful.

Agreed. This is also a warning for us as Christians not to get involved with 'culture wars' or 'campus free speech battles' unless our holy elders tell us to do so.
 

Stoyan

 
Banned
Orthodox
His Holiness Orthodox Metropolitan of Belgrade and Patriarch of the Serbian and Coastal Porphyrios lands in to hostile apostate (due to communism) town of Cetinje to enthrone the Orthodox Metropolitan of Montenegro Joanikije in the historical see of Cetinje's Monastery. The local apostates helped by the various liberals, communists, secularists, atheists had blocked all the main roads leading to Cetinje, to prevent the visit of the Patriarch to Cetinje's Monastery, so the Patriarch bypassed the barricades and rubbles by air. The Government fearing possible assassination of the Patriarch organized heavy police security. 60 people were hurt trying to overrun police and break in to the monastery which guards the sacred incorrupt hand of St. John the Baptist.

 
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