Other Orthodox Lounge Thread

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member

2 Russian Navy Nuclear Subs Have Churches Inside Them​

In a solemn ceremony held at the RF Northern Fleet submarine base in Gadzhievo, Murmansk region, two portable iconostases were consecrated and handed over to crews of two nuclear submarine strategic missile cruisers: Knyaz Oleg and Novosibirsk, the fleet's press service reported.

An iconostasis is a wall of icons, used to divide the Altar from the rest of the church space. Portable iconostases for sailing warships are made of wood, but for submarines, they use fabric. Such icons do not take up much space in the very limited space. On church feast days, canvases with icons are unpacked and mounted on special frames. At other times, they are stored in a compact package that weighs only a few kilograms.

Two iconostases that have been handed over to submarine crews, come as a present from the retired vice-admiral Alexander Brazhnik, president of the charity Foundation for assistance to veterans and invalids of armed forces, who had served in the Northern Fleet for a long time.

"The Foundation sees part of its mission in the revival of a naval and army tradition - to have mobile Orthodox churches on warships and in military units”, Alexander Brazhnik says. “More than a hundred years ago this tradition was interrupted. As of today the Foundation has already passed 68 portable iconostases over to the military, including 22 mobile churches that we have already given to submarine and warships crews in all fleets".
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Good talk. It's interesting to see the disconnect from religion - which people including myself in the past shy away from instantly when mentioned - and at the same time people believing in ''something'', yet not able to bring it into words.

 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
I ran across this article on the American Conservative website, by Rod Dreyer. The title initially appears to be about the Latin mass, but actually the article is about his experience with the Orthodox Divine Liturgy, having been first a Catholic, and now Orthodox for the past 16 years. He talks about how the Divine Liturgy brings a person into the presence of God in a way that he never experienced with typical modern worship services.

 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Interesting documentary about the Great Schism. Such an overlooked event in Western history/Christianity. I had never heard of it, always focus on the Reformation, which was a diversion from a diversion before, being the Great Schism. Really makes you understand how far Protestantism has drifted, albeit they had fair critique on the Catholic Church.

 

Iacobus

Sparrow
Orthodox
Interesting documentary about the Great Schism. Such an overlooked event in Western history/Christianity. I had never heard of it, always focus on the Reformation, which was a diversion from a diversion before, being the Great Schism. Really makes you understand how far Protestantism has drifted, albeit they had fair critique on the Catholic Church.



A couple years ago I bought a coffee table book "Timelines of History" published by DK and I was astonished when I reached the section on the 11th century and they did not so much as mention the Schism! It's so important for understanding not only Church history but European history.

If you're interested to dig deeper, I found "The Age of Division" by John Strickland to be a great read on the topic, it covers the Great Schism & analyzes how Roman theology began drifting away from Orthodox theology.
 

GOBLIN

 
Banned
Orthodox
A couple years ago I bought a coffee table book "Timelines of History" published by DK and I was astonished when I reached the section on the 11th century and they did not so much as mention the Schism! It's so important for understanding not only Church history but European history.

If you're interested to dig deeper, I found "The Age of Division" by John Strickland to be a great read on the topic, it covers the Great Schism & analyzes how Roman theology began drifting away from Orthodox theology.
Respectfully: Throughout our lives, either in a singular or a corporate sense, we are tempted to take our '30 pieces of silver'.
This is precisely what happened to the Roman church. Overcome with pride of place, the Pope and the Curia wanted power, influence and earthly glory. The Orthodox, due to the collegiate nature of their hierarchy, had a certain protection from such error; but the Vatican, due to the imperial structure of it's hierarchy, was uniquely vulnerable and it failed the test.

Thus the Roman 'Catholic' church became the First . Protestant . Church .

After which the debacle of the Lutheran corruption in the 1500s was unavoidable and a foregone conclusion.
 

GOBLIN

 
Banned
Orthodox
A couple years ago I bought a coffee table book "Timelines of History" published by DK and I was astonished when I reached the section on the 11th century and they did not so much as mention the Schism! It's so important for understanding not only Church history but European history.

If you're interested to dig deeper, I found "The Age of Division" by John Strickland to be a great read on the topic, it covers the Great Schism & analyzes how Roman theology began drifting away from Orthodox theology.

I ran across this article on the American Conservative website, by Rod Dreyer. The title initially appears to be about the Latin mass, but actually the article is about his experience with the Orthodox Divine Liturgy, having been first a Catholic, and now Orthodox for the past 16 years. He talks about how the Divine Liturgy brings a person into the presence of God in a way that he never experienced with typical modern worship services.

"I don't make hell for nobody. I'm only the instrument of a laughing providence. Sometimes I don't like it myself, but I couldn't help it if I was born lucky".
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
I sometimes find myself wallowing in the unease it takes to go from an entire secular perspective to the truth, and all inbetween. Fr Heers puts it in right perspective and instead of complaining about it or feeling negative about it, it's good uneasiness, that is necessary to clean oneself.



Also, a good take on how to view others who do evil acts. It's hard, also for myself, to not get angry at people like Bill Gates, or whoever is doing evil to the world (myself included), but if we view this behavior as a sickness, as Fr Heers says, why wouldn't we be willing to heal the person? If we see a sick person, do we get angry at him for being sick, or do we try to heal him?

 
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fiasco360

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
A bit of a surprise for me.

Speaking to my parents - I was under the impression that I was baptized at a specific church when I was a young boy. To my surprise I was not - and was given a decades old baptism pamphlet with mine and my sister's name on it. My parents informed me it was at a Presbyterian church.

My families regular church was Oriental Orthodox and given the new information - I felt obligated to change my denomination on my profile from "Orthodox" to "Inquirer."

I will be reaching out to another church to undergo the process to become baptized into Orthodoxy.
 

Iacobus

Sparrow
Orthodox
Does anyone have book recommendations for Orthodox missionaries who traveled to spread the faith? I've been reading St. Innocent of Alaska's biography which is fantastic & is making me want more.
 
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