Other Orthodox Lounge Thread

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Robin
Orthodox
If an Orthodox seminarian's seminary is affiliated with a specific jurisdiction (OCA, ROCOR, etc.) but the aspiring priest for whatever reason wants to be a priest for a different jurisdiction, what would have to happen?
 

windsofchange

 
Banned
Orthodox
Also you could check out a more recent missionary, Father Cosmas, who dedicated his life to ministry in Zaire. Uncut Mountain Press have a book that seems well regarded, although I haven't read it myself:

Amazing, thanks for sharing
 

OrthoSerb

Woodpecker
Orthodox
If an Orthodox seminarian's seminary is affiliated with a specific jurisdiction (OCA, ROCOR, etc.) but the aspiring priest for whatever reason wants to be a priest for a different jurisdiction, what would have to happen?
My understanding is that you need the blessing of your current Bishop to attend any seminary. Where you eventually become a priest, if you become a priest at all, is not directly linked to which seminary you attended. Graduating from Jordanville for example doesn't mean you have to serve in ROCOR. We have one sub-deacon in my parish (Serbian) who is studying in Jordanville and hopes to serve our parish as a priest. Jordanville just happened to be the best option for him with respect to seminaries.
 

Akaky Akakievitch

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
I recently just came across Roosh's article reviewing Father Daniel Sysoev's The Law of God:


I've been looking everywhere for a copy but it seems to be sold out? Also I'm in the UK so there are some stores perhaps over in the US which will not do international shipping. I was wondering if anyone could help me locate a copy or put me in touch with someone who knows where it can be found. The link provided in the article is returning a 404 error message, looks like Ancient Faith store have sold out of it too.

There is a kindle edition, which I will consider purchasing if there are no physical copies anywhere to be found. I'll keep asking around and see what comes up.

For now, I've ordered the Catechism of St Philaret, which should be enough for the meantime. I should have got round to reading this in full several months ago, I've only read parts of it online.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I recently just came across Roosh's article reviewing Father Daniel Sysoev's The Law of God:


I've been looking everywhere for a copy but it seems to be sold out? Also I'm in the UK so there are some stores perhaps over in the US which will not do international shipping. I was wondering if anyone could help me locate a copy or put me in touch with someone who knows where it can be found. The link provided in the article is returning a 404 error message, looks like Ancient Faith store have sold out of it too.

There is a kindle edition, which I will consider purchasing if there are no physical copies anywhere to be found. I'll keep asking around and see what comes up.

For now, I've ordered the Catechism of St Philaret, which should be enough for the meantime. I should have got round to reading this in full several months ago, I've only read parts of it online.
Two of these stores had copies as of last week but now seems to be sold out. You can use the email notification option for the Jordanville store.

https://churchsupplies.jordanville.org/9785427900270EN/ (their Media Mail shipping option is pretty cheap)

 

Akaky Akakievitch

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
Two of these stores had copies as of last week but now seems to be sold out. You can use the email notification option for the Jordanville store.

https://churchsupplies.jordanville.org/9785427900270EN/ (their Media Mail shipping option is pretty cheap)


Ah i see, well I've signed up to the email notifications for Jordanville.

I did find two other sources since I messaged earlier:



The first one is US only, and the second option seems okay but i'm having issues ordering through the website. I'll get there eventually, thanks for your help.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
I heard fr Heers talking about not getting into dialogue with Satan in order to prevent his influence and then it struck me that indeed once you start the dialogue with Satan, the thoughts fill your mind and you'll be tempted to do a certain thing. Now if you avoid that dialogue from even starting you avoid the thoughts and the temptation to do certain things. I thought a very useful way as we tend to start the dialogue and then start to fight Satan but it's already too late then often.
 

Iacobus

Sparrow
Orthodox
Yes I often argue that point against Jungians... they think engaging with the shadow is the way forward but Orthodoxy is very clear that you only empower the demons by doing anything but fleeing away from them & toward Christ. Which makes a whole lot more sense to me. Of course you have to practice this the right way & with the help of God, the Church and the sacraments, otherwise unhealthy repression is possible.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm delving through the protestant denominations. I'm shocked at what I find. How could and can these in often cases outright demonic and absurd movements spread all around the world? Well, because they evangelize heavily. In any case, it's almost unreal to see what has happened and that frankly anyone with a Bible in their hand can start a movement without any centralized hierarchy, coming up with the most demonic stuff like double predestination, or speaking in tongues which apparantly 300 to 600 million charismatics and pentecostals worldwide, fastly increasing. I object heavily to the worldly character of the papal protestant church and the position of the pope, but at least to a large extent keeps things together and although it decays especially since Vat 2, it's not imploding into endless pieces like protestantism. Things you can encounter in protestantism really have no bound and truly are cacodox to apt degree.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
One of the reasons for the rapid spread of various contemporary evangelical denominations is marketability. The wholesale embrace of modern marketing has been a wild success for evangelicalism. For instance, Pentecostalism sells: the music, the catchy preaching by attractive, slick pastors. In comparison, Orthodoxy doesn't have quite the same curb appeal. The ability to condense Christianity down to a compact, marketable form and get numerical results has been a feature of protestantism since at least the revival/Great Awakening era, but it's especially amplified today.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
One of the reasons for the rapid spread of various contemporary evangelical denominations is marketability. The wholesale embrace of modern marketing has been a wild success for evangelicalism. For instance, Pentecostalism sells: the music, the catchy preaching by attractive, slick pastors. In comparison, Orthodoxy doesn't have quite the same curb appeal. The ability to condense Christianity down to a compact, marketable form and get numerical results has been a feature of protestantism since at least the revival/Great Awakening era, but it's especially amplified today.
True, but Orthodoxy also doesn't take a serious effort to evangelize contrary to these movements. To get to Orthodoxy you either have to be a protestant/Roman Catholic looking for more depth in the faith, or come to it through an extreme ordeal of circumstances like most of us here. There's no one coming to you to tell you about the truth of Orthodoxy. Most protestants/Roman Catholics wouldn't even have an idea about the Church history and that Orthodoxy actually is ancient Christianity. This makes it more unique, but also difficult to find, as I fully understand as you say simply due to the outreach and also the simple quantitative number of churches people are likely to especially end up in some of the 500k protestant groups, since Roman Catholicism has got a very bad reputation due to the paedophilia scandals, which I've heard for many normies is the NO1 thing they have against it right now.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
To get to Orthodoxy you either have to be a protestant/Roman Catholic looking for more depth in the faith, or come to it through an extreme ordeal of circumstances like most of us here. There's no one coming to you to tell you about the truth of Orthodoxy.
Perhaps that's how God ordained it. There has to be preconditions met by a secularized person before they can even comprehend Orthodoxy. It could be like a funnel.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Perhaps that's how God ordained it. There has to be preconditions met by a secularized person before they can even comprehend Orthodoxy. It could be like a funnel.
I stopped entirely to try to enlighten people around me in whatever way possible, whether it's about corona, new world order, the spiritual war as reality of this world. If people are not ready they will not receive. As fr Peter Heers says our goal should be to be that change ourselves, to let people see Christ through us and perhaps make them curious that way of why we are how we are. That's a long way to go for a fallen human, but it should be the goal.

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