Content Orthodox memes

Tom Slick

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Wait...i legitimately don't understand this...

Is this a reference to be in the middle east Muslim society or Chinese society or Catholic and this is heretical to the family ?

Honest question
I think it's just a parody of a simple, secular family whose greatest value is making money, which the father praises when his son pursues on his own, and for which his father punishes him by withholding his inheritance when his son pursues non-material values.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
This is from the Babylon Bee, and usually they're hilarious, but sometimes are blasphemous.

I realize that it's a satire site, and they're free to do as they like, but I'm not comfortable with using Our Lord for the sake of humour. It comes off as irreverent.

I'm don't think this is blasphemy. I guess it's possible to see it as irreverent, but I don't personally see it that way. I think the writers of the joke are known Christians, so their joke is light hearted, not casting any disrespect on Jesus.

I was curious if Jesus ever told a joke, and I found the link below that says many of Jesus sayings were intentionally funny. For instance, saying it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into heaven was funny. Saying not to worry about the speck in your brother's eye until you remove the beam in your own eye is funny too. Nobody actually has a beam in their eye. He was exaggerating for comic or rhetorical effect. I never thought of it this way before.

In fact, I would say when he told the disciples to forgive seventy time seven, he was purposely exaggerating too. Obviously he meant you should really, really forgive, but saying seventy times seven was a funny way of conveying the idea. I think reusing this for a joke about masks is within bounds.

I will say I found the bit about the masks only moderately amusing, unlike some Babylon Bee stuff that is hilarious.

https://blog.bible/bible-blog/entry/did-jesus-tell-jokes
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El Draque

 
Banned
Orthodox
I was curious if Jesus ever told a joke, and I found the link below that says many of Jesus sayings were intentionally funny. For instance, saying it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into heaven was funny.

Isn't the 'needle' a reference to a narrow passageway that was in each corner of a four-walled rectangle fortification?

It's not literally a needle, as i recall reading, at least, rather a very narrow pass.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
Isn't the 'needle' a reference to a narrow passageway that was in each corner of a four-walled rectangle fortification?

It's not literally a needle, as i recall reading, at least, rather a very narrow pass.
I've heard that too, and considered adding a parenthetical to my post. From pictures I've seen it would still be hard to get a camel through that gate, but possible. In any case, now that it was pointed out to me as an example of humor, I still think it counts even knowing about the gate.

I like thinking that Jesus was able to joke around. Somehow I think I always thought of him as serious all the time, but now I see he used this form of humorous exaggeration a lot to get his points across.
 
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aguy01

Sparrow
Orthodox
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SeaEagle

Woodpecker
Trad Catholic
Isn't the 'needle' a reference to a narrow passageway that was in each corner of a four-walled rectangle fortification?

It's not literally a needle, as i recall reading, at least, rather a very narrow pass.
I wouldn't mind clarification on this as well. I've heard someone explain that this passage means that the camel must first be stripped of its baggage before it can enter, and then reloaded when it passed onto the other side. This person was trying to rationalize the acquisition of wealth on Earth.
 

fiasco360

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
I've heard that too, and considered adding a parenthetical to my post. From pictures I've seen it would still be hard to get a camel through that gate, but possible. In any case, now that it was pointed out to me as an example of humor, I still think it counts even knowing about the gate.

I like thinking that Jesus was able to joke around. Somehow I think I always thought of him as serious all the time, but now I see he used this form of humorous exaggeration a lot to get his points across.
Not to deviate too much but I believe that "gamla" (syriac translation) in Matthew 19:24 ܓܲܡܠܵܐ can refer to either "rope" or "camel" or even potentially "thistle"

Take that for what it's worth.
 
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