Orthodox Noob Questions

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
A handsome man born in a loving family will have less trouble thinking of Creation as "perfect" and praising God for it than someone who is a disfigured dwarf, condemned to a lifelong celibacy, and has only experienced horrible things in his life. I've actually met such a dwarf in real life, in a small French town, and he hated Christianity with a passion. He had been bullied and demeaned his entire life for no fault of his own.
On the contrary, this often leads to pride and downfall. Lucifer was the most beautiful of God's angels.

We have leper saints - Saint Nicephoros, blind saints - Saint Didymus, and Christ Himself called Zacchaeus, a man of short stature, to be His disciple.

Why is there so much natural inequality in God's creation? Why are some human beings born intelligent and good-looking, others disabled or ugly?
Our disabilities come from our fallen and corrupted nature. We inherit the consequences of Adam and Eve's sin, much like someone inherits the consequences of a father who gambled your inheritance away or a mother with a drinking addiction.

Still, as I've already hinted at, there are natural hierarchies. Even the angels are divided into several ranks and are each made unique. What would be the point of creation if it were all the same?
 

Turner

Chicken
Orthodox Inquirer
Hello everyone. This is my first post here, but I have been following Roosh for a few years now on and off.

Here's my short introduction of my issue and my question(s).

I was baptized in a Swedish Covenant (basically evangelical) traveling church. However, I have not gone to church since I was a small child because my parents didn't fit in with the upper middle class nature of the church. I was agnostic until around 2018 when I became what I called Christian non-denominational. I am sporadic in my study, but in action I am seemingly living closer and closer to the bible. In 2019 I decided to go to a local church. Upon arrival I was greeted with signage stating LGBTQ and BLM rhetoric. I quickly turned my car around and went home. I tried looking up all the local churches to find a good one, but I did not find one that even remotely seemed...God-like. Most of these churches are promoting their worship rock bands, weird events, and some of the sermons I tried listening to on their Facebook pages were not anything I could even relate to. Most other churches around here are Catholic and there are several masques as well.

The shut down closed all churches by me so my pathetic pursuit to find a good church left me to give up for some time. However, recently I have been getting the urge to actually find a church and community that is like-minded in my pursuit of God and teachings. That's when I stumbled upon Orthodoxy. I knew Roosh mentioned he went to an Armenian Orthodox Church, but I figured these Orthodox churches were reserved for specific nationality. I am a complete novice in all things related to theology and church, but can instantly tell Orthodoxy is what I envision religion to be.

So my question is, how do I go about this? I found out the little church 2 minutes from my house is a Greek Orthodox Church, and 2 minutes away from there is a Serbian Orthodox Church. Is there a difference between the two? I'm not Greek or Serbian if that matters. Do I just go and sit in back and listen? Do I speak to someone? When I say I am a novice in this...I really mean I have never even spoken to priest since I was a child. Any advice would be appreciated. I am going to go to the Greek Orthodox Church Greek festival they are having this weekend. I figured I'd speak to them there.
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
Hello everyone. This is my first post here, but I have been following Roosh for a few years now on and off.

Here's my short introduction of my issue and my question(s).

I was baptized in a Swedish Covenant (basically evangelical) traveling church. However, I have not gone to church since I was a small child because my parents didn't fit in with the upper middle class nature of the church. I was agnostic until around 2018 when I became what I called Christian non-denominational. I am sporadic in my study, but in action I am seemingly living closer and closer to the bible. In 2019 I decided to go to a local church. Upon arrival I was greeted with signage stating LGBTQ and BLM rhetoric. I quickly turned my car around and went home. I tried looking up all the local churches to find a good one, but I did not find one that even remotely seemed...God-like. Most of these churches are promoting their worship rock bands, weird events, and some of the sermons I tried listening to on their Facebook pages were not anything I could even relate to. Most other churches around here are Catholic and there are several masques as well.

The shut down closed all churches by me so my pathetic pursuit to find a good church left me to give up for some time. However, recently I have been getting the urge to actually find a church and community that is like-minded in my pursuit of God and teachings. That's when I stumbled upon Orthodoxy. I knew Roosh mentioned he went to an Armenian Orthodox Church, but I figured these Orthodox churches were reserved for specific nationality. I am a complete novice in all things related to theology and church, but can instantly tell Orthodoxy is what I envision religion to be.

So my question is, how do I go about this? I found out the little church 2 minutes from my house is a Greek Orthodox Church, and 2 minutes away from there is a Serbian Orthodox Church. Is there a difference between the two? I'm not Greek or Serbian if that matters. Do I just go and sit in back and listen? Do I speak to someone? When I say I am a novice in this...I really mean I have never even spoken to priest since I was a child. Any advice would be appreciated. I am going to go to the Greek Orthodox Church Greek festival they are having this weekend. I figured I'd speak to them there.

Go to the festival for sure. See if you can make friends.

As far as church... Either way you go:


Show up. Be respectful, try and make the sign of the cross when you hear the mention of the Holy Trinity....follow the customs you can pick up on. It takes time...

Keep showing up and if you're interested go to an inquirers class.

That will open all the doors.

Best of luck and God bless you.
 

Turner

Chicken
Orthodox Inquirer
Go to the festival for sure. See if you can make friends.

As far as church... Either way you go:


Show up. Be respectful, try and make the sign of the cross when you hear the mention of the Holy Trinity....follow the customs you can pick up on. It takes time...

Keep showing up and if you're interested go to an inquirers class.

That will open all the doors.

Best of luck and God bless you.

Thank you for the reply. That is a great idea and I'm glad you mentioned trying to follow the customs while in the church. Don't think I would have thought to do that originally. It is a small place and seems quite friendly from the outside. Looking forward to talking to them this weekend at their festival. The timing is almost too perfect.
 

Replicant_Gyr

Sparrow
Orthodox
Our parish priest (OCA) has recently began a series of catechism and other church classes via Zoom. While I understand the intent. I have not been attending them out of rebellion against Zoom corporation and other qualms I have with the company, security etc. Yet, I feel guilty about not being part of the discussions, and I feel like I am shunning the priest in doing so. While I must often use Zoom in a professional and educational setting, I am refusing to use it in a spiritual setting. Am I in the wrong? I think we gain a lot more from meeting in person. We are in a city with practically no restrictions as far as Covid.
 

Tardynox

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Our parish priest (OCA) has recently began a series of catechism and other church classes via Zoom. While I understand the intent. I have not been attending them out of rebellion against Zoom corporation and other qualms I have with the company, security etc. Yet, I feel guilty about not being part of the discussions, and I feel like I am shunning the priest in doing so. While I must often use Zoom in a professional and educational setting, I am refusing to use it in a spiritual setting. Am I in the wrong? I think we gain a lot more from meeting in person. We are in a city with practically no restrictions as far as Covid.
Perhaps contact your priest about it and have a talk about it, would seem like a good idea to me.
 

OrthoSerb

Robin
Orthodox
Our parish priest (OCA) has recently began a series of catechism and other church classes via Zoom. While I understand the intent. I have not been attending them out of rebellion against Zoom corporation and other qualms I have with the company, security etc. Yet, I feel guilty about not being part of the discussions, and I feel like I am shunning the priest in doing so. While I must often use Zoom in a professional and educational setting, I am refusing to use it in a spiritual setting. Am I in the wrong? I think we gain a lot more from meeting in person. We are in a city with practically no restrictions as far as Covid.
You kind of answered your own question by framing your stance as a rebellion despite the fact you use Zoom for work and education. There's nothing wrong with preferring an in-person meeting but that's not an option you can impose. Your only decision is to attend or not attend.
 

quilter

 
Banned
Orthodox
I have a very noob question:

If I want to attend the Sunday service at an Orthodox church, am I supposed to contact the priest in advance? For context, I'm not baptized nor am I very knowledgeable about the Faith. So I'm a bit self conscious about it, since I don't know the "procedures" of the Liturgy, etc.

The advantage of emailing first is that from the response (if any) you may get an idea of if the church is right for you, the priest will usually tell you a bit about the congregation and you'll get a feel for how welcome you will be. Though just going without prior contact is perfectly good too
 

ItalianStallion9

Woodpecker
Protestant
What is the Orthodox stance on Pre-Destination/election?

In addition - what about age of accountability? I've read Orthodox lean more towards Ancestral sin compared with Original sin which could relate to young children being saved by default?
 

Brebelle3

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm currently in Vietnam and having a difficult time finding the one Orthodox parish that is said to be in the city I'm currently living.

I feel the need to be in the church.

My question is, as a follower of Orthodoxy and God willing a future convert, would it be permissable or understandable to attend mass at a catholic church to be with The Lord? I hope this makes sense.
 

Lawrence87

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Our parish priest (OCA) has recently began a series of catechism and other church classes via Zoom. While I understand the intent. I have not been attending them out of rebellion against Zoom corporation and other qualms I have with the company, security etc. Yet, I feel guilty about not being part of the discussions, and I feel like I am shunning the priest in doing so. While I must often use Zoom in a professional and educational setting, I am refusing to use it in a spiritual setting. Am I in the wrong? I think we gain a lot more from meeting in person. We are in a city with practically no restrictions as far as Covid.
I think it depends on the reason behind taking things to Zoom. Is it really to do with COVID or is it for some other reason?

Some priests have secular jobs and/or a busy family life, it could be that in order to fit it in their schedule they have decided to utilize the technology.
 

newcomer

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm currently in Vietnam and having a difficult time finding the one Orthodox parish that is said to be in the city I'm currently living.

I feel the need to be in the church.

My question is, as a follower of Orthodoxy and God willing a future convert, would it be permissable or understandable to attend mass at a catholic church to be with The Lord? I hope this makes sense.
I am only a catechumen, but attending catholic church is not permitted as far as I know. Roman Catholics disconnected from the only true church during The Great schism and are outside of it ever since. As an Orthodox, you dont pray together with heretics/schismatics.
Feel free to correct me od I am wrong.

You are in a tough situation, hope it gets better for you soon.
 

Brebelle3

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer

rodion

Sparrow
Orthodox
What is the Orthodox stance on Pre-Destination/election?

In addition - what about age of accountability? I've read Orthodox lean more towards Ancestral sin compared with Original sin which could relate to young children being saved by default?

Caveat: I am not super well-versed in theology, I just read a book that touched on this recently.

My understanding is that the Orthodox teaching of man’s relationship with God is one of synergy. God calls, but man must choose to answer the call.

Predestination developed from an over-emphasis on grace in the work of St. Augustine, but that’s a nuanced topic far beyond me to sufficiently delve into, however Fr. Seraphim wrote an excellent book on the subject; “the place of Blessed Augustine in the Orthodox Church.”

Perhaps this may help
 
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