Overcoming OCD and depression

Steady Hands

Robin
Gold Member
@King of Rock & roll

Here are 3 points for you to consider:

1. You have got some helpful advice already, much of it you can do by yourself but - as evident in your OP - you cannot manage this alone. No man is an island.

Sure, you had some experiences with some psychiatrists and medication that did not resolve the issue, and it makes sense that you are hesitant to try again. However I would urge you to find a professional who specialises in OCD and depression, and has a track record of helping people in these areas.

2. You also stated that you are a hermit - this self-isolating behaviour is likely to be perpetuating your condition and inward-looking tendencies.

It is good you have made some recent effort in this area, and I would suggest you consider finding a local men's group, church community, sports club or other group in which you can share an activity you like, make some social connections, and build your social skills. This will be hard at the start, but rewarding in the end.

3. Many posters start these threads about their mental health, spiritual issues, physical complaints and other issues that are important and can impact many of readers. Few posters follow up with reports on their plans, actual ongoing action, outcomes, and reflection throughout the process. This leaves participants wondering, 'what is the point of replying if the OP does nothing with the advice or never lets us know how things are going?'

Rather than just being yet another poster who takes in all the advice then does nothing with it, or at least does not write about it, I hope you will do something with the suggestions and report back on your progress and stumbling blocks. Another benefit of this public yet anonymous diary-like reporting is that you will be more likely to maintain your action plan since you may now feel more accountable.

All the best.
 
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NoFunInAus

Kingfisher
Look inside yourself. This could be helpful to do daily


Wim Hof is a freemason so I wouldn't take any advice from him.

That saying; I think most of us are in a depressed state now, fights with the wife (who will blame you for everything) to not finding a job.

Best thing that works for me is to learn a new skill and get completely absorbed in it. Getting the max score in a videogame is not a skill, but wood carving, carpentry or even fishing would be a good start.
 

fortyfive

Woodpecker
This leaves participants wondering, 'what is the point of replying if the OP does nothing with the advice or never lets us know how things are going?'
“Few things are sadder than encountering a person who knows exactly what he should do, yet cannot muster enough energy to do it. "He who desires but acts not," wrote Blake with his accustomed vigor, "Breeds pestilence.”
― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience
 

fortyfive

Woodpecker
Best thing that works for me is to learn a new skill and get completely absorbed in it. Getting the max score in a videogame is not a skill, but wood carving, carpentry or even fishing would be a good start.
You are using a well-known technique described in a famous book Flow. It works certainly, that's why I suggested to OP going to the forest and learn how to make fire and cooking something simple. It's a joy to learn something and doing it. Passive watching tv or any media cannot produce such joy.

“Contrary to what we usually believe, moments like these, the best moments in our lives, are not the passive, receptive, relaxing times—although such experiences can also be enjoyable if we have worked hard to attain them. The best moments usually occur when a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile. Optimal experience is thus something that we
make happen. For a child, it could be placing with trembling fingers the last block on a tower she has built, higher than any she has built so far; for a swimmer, it could be trying to beat his own record; for a violinist, mastering an intricate musical passage. For each person there are thousands of opportunities, challenges to expand ourselves.”
― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience
 

ItalianStallion9

Woodpecker
I had OCD when i was younger.

Write down all your compulsions/habits in order from least intrusive to most. Least intrusive might be avoiding the number 9. Most intrusive might be spending 20 min every night checking your room for spiders.

Slowly tackle your habits, starting with the easiest. If your easiest is avoiding the number 9...start using the number 9. It's going to feel horrible at first, but keep doing it. Every day start to trick your brain by doing the things you don't want. In some ways, OCD is also a way of trying not to jinx yourself. "If I land on the number 9, something bad will happen. If i never land on 9, nothing bad can happen".

By starting with the easiest, you'll ease your brain into this. Essentially it's facing your fears, and slowly tricking your brain.

(Side note, some habits may have some use. Is it better for humans to avoid the number 6?)
 

Johnnyvee

Ostrich
I had OCD when i was younger.

Write down all your compulsions/habits in order from least intrusive to most. Least intrusive might be avoiding the number 9. Most intrusive might be spending 20 min every night checking your room for spiders.

Slowly tackle your habits, starting with the easiest. If your easiest is avoiding the number 9...start using the number 9. It's going to feel horrible at first, but keep doing it. Every day start to trick your brain by doing the things you don't want. In some ways, OCD is also a way of trying not to jinx yourself. "If I land on the number 9, something bad will happen. If i never land on 9, nothing bad can happen".

By starting with the easiest, you'll ease your brain into this. Essentially it's facing your fears, and slowly tricking your brain.

(Side note, some habits may have some use. Is it better for humans to avoid the number 6?)

The numbers thing is usually a focal point in people with OCD, including myself also. I find it interesting that I always sought the number 3, and always wanted to avoid 6. (even before I could have been aware of any religious writings on this) 3x3 is good also, but 2x3=6, hence it`s bad etc. Sounds crazy, but that`s the way my brain works. Still I have to check car plates and so on, and end on a 3. I know that Nikola Tesla had something similar. He apparently had to circle a building 3 times before he walked in the door.

Might there be some divine order to the numbers after all? Mathematics is integral to the universe, and I mean that literally. There is a mathematical structure to things, that is why math works in terms of science. So although it`s not useful for someone with OCD to focus on those things, there might be something to it.
 
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