C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
Many penny stocks are risky, but I bought a few shares in this medical diagnostics stock. One share is cheaper than a hamburger and it has good potential.


LUCD appears to be a strong prospect, as its product is already in pivotal trial, which is equivalent to a drug Phase III trial if I understand correctly. Its stock price is currently near its all-time low price, and it seems to be because investors feel that the market for their product isn't as robust as they believed a year ago, for whatever reason. The pro stock analysts (for what that's worth) a year ago set the stock's value at $13-18 but this past March lowered it to $7-12. I put in a limit order to buy some shares on Monday.
 
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MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
LUCD appears to be a strong prospect, as its product is already in pivotal trial, which is equivalent to a drug Phase III trial if I understand correctly. Its stock price is currently near its all-time low price, and it seems to be because investors feel that the market for their product isn't as robust as they believed a year ago, for whatever reason. The pro stock analysts (for what that's worth) a year ago set the stock's value at $13-18 but this past March lowered it to $7-12. I put in a limit order to buy some shares on Monday.
I see know that new medical stocks are very high risk-high potential reward and there are tons out there (most of which will likely fail). Another one that I am considering, but with reservations is MDXG. I put it on my watchlist. I want to see if more articles come out about it.

There website is professional and the products look very exciting. I had never heard of these products before.


Some news is positive.


This analyst is positive about the stock, but of course they are often wrong as well.


I am more cautious on this one because it seems there has been some corruption in the company and the price trend has declined pretty fast. The company was pretty foolish to try and scam the US government; I guess they don't have the right connections to get away with such games.

 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
I see know that new medical stocks are very high risk-high potential reward and there are tons out there (most of which will likely fail).
It's easier and less costly to get medical devices/technology approved by the FDA than drugs. I do have some money already invested in a couple of medtech companies like InspireMD (NSPR), which is trying to introduce an arterial stent into the US health system. My impression, however, is that the deck is stacked against small medtech companies in ways in which it isn't for small drug companies. I may be wrong, but it appears that the big medtech companies establish relationships with the big healthcare providers in which they give discounts and other financial incentives for buying their devices and machines, so it makes it harder for small companies to break into that manipulated market, even if they have an innovative device.

I recently overweighted my shares in a company called Citius (CTXR) because their share price is low and they have what appears to be a good product in its final trial. The product is a special attachment that is intended to resolve infections in catheters without having to replace the catheter. Once the device is approved, in about nine-months or so, I'm watching to see how well it sells. If it doesn't sell very well, it will lend credence to my theory that the game is rigged.
 

MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
It's easier and less costly to get medical devices/technology approved by the FDA than drugs. I do have some money already invested in a couple of medtech companies like InspireMD (NSPR), which is trying to introduce an arterial stent into the US health system. My impression, however, is that the deck is stacked against small medtech companies in ways in which it isn't for small drug companies. I may be wrong, but it appears that the big medtech companies establish relationships with the big healthcare providers in which they give discounts and other financial incentives for buying their devices and machines, so it makes it harder for small companies to break into that manipulated market, even if they have an innovative device.

I recently overweighted my shares in a company called Citius (CTXR) because their share price is low and they have what appears to be a good product in its final trial. The product is a special attachment that is intended to resolve infections in catheters without having to replace the catheter. Once the device is approved, in about nine-months or so, I'm watching to see how well it sells. If it doesn't sell very well, it will lend credence to my theory that the game is rigged.
I found CFRA reports on both. NSPR was rated 'sell' and CTXR was rated 'buy.' I wish they had Morningstar reports which are more detailed and likely more accurate as well, but small companies tend to have less known information. I added them in case you don't have them or if others here want to see them.

The home page of CTXR was disturbing, but I have to accept this is the norm for US companies. Perhaps they think this is a way to gain more customers. However, their pipeline looks promising and is worth a small risk.

Screenshot 2022-04-16 135733.jpg
 

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C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
I found CFRA reports on both. NSPR was rated 'sell' and CTXR was rated 'buy.' I wish they had Morningstar reports which are more detailed and likely more accurate as well, but small companies tend to have less known information. I added them in case you don't have them or if others here want to see them.
NSPR's stent has been approved in several countries in Europe, but it's not selling. They did a reverse stock split to stay in the NASDAQ (it has a rule that all members have to have a stock price of a dollar or more) and their share price has stayed steady since then. I get the impression that investors seem to feel they have a 50/50 chance of selling some stents in the US once they're approved. Once their stent is approved, I intend to sell my shares on the temporary bump as I'm not confident that it will sell any better in the US. I wasn't aware of the virtue-signaling by CTXR.

Another medtech company I've bought a few shares in is InVivo (NVIV). They're trying to get a spinal scaffold on the market that, if it works, might actually reverse paralysis in some people with spinal injuries. They are really a longshot, however, as I don't believe their product has actually reversed anyone's paralysis yet. They are really struggling to get enough people enrolled in their pivotal trial to get it started. They just announced a reverse stock split after their stock price sank to $.30.

I did a write-up of my experiences investing in small pharma stocks here: https://www.rooshvforum.com/threads/stock-market-thread.30231/page-73#post-1585810 . Besides InVivo, I've lost most of my investment in three other companies that have tanked: Advaxis (ADXS), Baudax Bio (BXRX), and Celsion (CLSN). I'm still holding them in case they ever get a product past a Phase II or III trial, but I doubt I'll ever fully recover what I put into them. In the past year I have sold two companies that have popped- Catalyst (CBIO) and Bellus (BLU) and made about 100% on my investment with them. The remaining 20 or so small pharma companies I've bought shares in are treading water, or slowly declining. It's entertaining to see if I'll make enough on the companies that do well to cover the companies that go under.

Invest in any of these at your own risk, but these are the other companies I've bought a few shares in:

- AIM Immunotech (AIM)- I think these guys are running a long-scam on investors and I plan to unload the stock as soon as its close to the breakeven point.

- Altamira (CYTO)- They have a product on the market called Bentrio which lines the nasal passages to reduce infections from viruses like COVID-19, but so far they haven't made much money off of it.

- Atyr (LIFE)- I've overweighted this stock because they seem to have a fairly good business plan.

- CTI Biopharma (CTIC)- This stock just popped upon approval of one of their drugs for market. I haven't sold it yet because the same drug could soon be approved to treat a different disease, and I likely will sell once that happens.

- First Wave (FWBI)- Their flagship drug flunked its first Phase II trial so they're redoing it and the results should be announced any day now

- Genprex (GNPX)- This company's strategy is to combine their drugs with licensed drugs from other companies to increase the chance of success. They got a moderate bump a few months ago when their flagship drug passed its 1b/2a trial. I may sell it when/if it passes its Phase 2b/3a trial in a year or so.

- Mereo (MREO)- This company's strategy is to partner with other companies who have drugs that have passed the Phase I trial and complete the process to get them to market. They have several drugs in Phase II trials that should have results any day now.

- Navidea (NAVB)- May be due for a reverse stock split soon as its price has dropped below a dollar.

- Oncocyte (OCX)- Treading water

- Oncolytics (ONCY)- Their main drug recently passed Phase I trial.

- Ovid (OVID)- Their share price has stayed fairly steady for the past year I think because they have two drugs in Phase III trials.

- Rigel (RIGL)- Share price has stayed fairly steady because they have a drug in Phase III trial.

- Seelos (SEEL)- Several drugs in Phase II trials. If they don't announce results soon they may have to do a reverse stock split.

- Selecta (SELB)- One drug in Phase III trial.

- Spectrum (SPPI)- Has one drug in Phase III trial. Company recently laid off some of its staff, making investors think that they don't expect their drug to pass its trial.

- Tiziana (TLSA)- Has a couple of drugs about to enter Phase II trials. They may have to do a reverse stock split some time this year.

- Verastem (VSTM)- Couple of cancer drugs in Phase II trials.

- Vistagen (VTGN)- One drug in Phase III trial.

- Xeris (XERS)- I originally bought this stock as Strongbridge, which was acquired by Xeris in a deal that didn't make me any money. Xeris has several drugs on the market but so far doesn't seem to be making much money from them.
 
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MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
My guess
NSPR's stent has been approved in several countries in Europe, but it's not selling. They did a reverse stock split to stay in the NASDAQ (it has a rule that all members have to have a stock price of a dollar or more) and their share price has stayed steady since then. I get the impression that investors seem to feel they have a 50/50 chance of selling some stents in the US once they're approved. Once their stent is approved, I intend to sell my shares on the temporary bump as I'm not confident that it will sell any better in the US. I wasn't aware of the virtue-signaling by CTXR.

Another medtech company I've bought a few shares in is InVivo (NVIV). They're trying to get a spinal scaffold on the market that, if it works, might actually reverse paralysis in some people with spinal injuries. They are really a longshot, however, as I don't believe their product has actually reversed anyone's paralysis yet. They are really struggling to get enough people enrolled in their pivotal trial to get it started. They just announced a reverse stock split after their stock price sank to $.30.

I did a write-up of my experiences investing in small pharma stocks here: https://www.rooshvforum.com/threads/stock-market-thread.30231/page-73#post-1585810 . Besides InVivo, I've lost most of my investment in three other companies that have tanked: Advaxis (ADXS), Baudax Bio (BXRX), and Celsion (CLSN). I'm still holding them in case they ever get a product past a Phase II or III trial, but I doubt I'll ever fully recover what I put into them. In the past year I have sold two companies that have popped- Catalyst (CBIO) and Bellus (BLU) and made about 100% on my investment with them. The remaining 20 or so small pharma companies I've bought shares in are treading water, or slowly declining. It's entertaining to see if I'll make enough on the companies that do well to cover the companies that go under.

Invest in any of these at your own risk, but these are the other companies I've bought a few shares in:

- AIM Immunotech (AIM)- I think these guys are running a long-scam on investors and I plan to unload the stock as soon as its close to the breakeven point.

- Altamira (CYTO)- They have a product on the market called Bentrio which lines the nasal passages to reduce infections from viruses like COVID-19, but so far they haven't made much money off of it.

- Atyr (LIFE)- I've overweighted this stock because they seem to have a fairly good business plan.

- CTI Biopharma (CTIC)- This stock just popped upon approval of one of their drugs for market. I haven't sold it yet because the same drug could soon be approved to treat a different disease, and I likely will sell once that happens.

- First Wave (FWBI)- Their flagship drug flunked its first Phase II trial so they're redoing it and the results should be announced any day now

- Genprex (GNPX)- This company's strategy is to combine their drugs with licensed drugs from other companies to increase the chance of success. They got a moderate bump a few months ago when their flagship drug passed its 1b/2a trial. I may sell it when/if it passes its Phase 2b/3a trial in a year or so.

- Mereo (MREO)- This company's strategy is to partner with other companies who have drugs that have passed the Phase I trial and complete the process to get them to market. They have several drugs in Phase II trials that should have results any day now.

- Navidea (NAVB)- May be due for a reverse stock split soon as its price has dropped below a dollar.

- Oncocyte (OCX)- Treading water

- Oncolytics (ONCY)- Their main drug recently passed Phase I trial.

- Ovid (OVID)- Their share price has stayed fairly steady for the past year I think because they have two drugs in Phase III trials.

- Rigel (RIGL)- Share price has stayed fairly steady because they have a drug in Phase III trial.

- Seelos (SEEL)- Several drugs in Phase II trials. If they don't announce results soon they may have to do a reverse stock split.

- Selecta (SELB)- One drug in Phase III trial.

- Spectrum (SPPI)- Has one drug in Phase III trial. Company recently laid off some of its staff, making investors think that they don't expect their drug to pass its trial.

- Tiziana (TLSA)- Has a couple of drugs about to enter Phase II trials. They may have to do a reverse stock split some time this year.

- Verastem (VSTM)- Couple of cancer drugs in Phase II trials.

- Vistagen (VTGN)- One drug in Phase III trial.

- Xeris (XERS)- I originally bought this stock as Strongbridge, which was acquired by Xeris in a deal that didn't make me any money. Xeris has several drugs on the market but so far doesn't seem to be making much money from them.
Good write up about the small pharma stocks. I did research on a couple companies today and when I see their stock prices gradually declining and then staying flat for several months, it is a concern.

A few years ago, I have shares in Gilead Sciences (GILD) and decided to sell it for a small profit. The stock is still way down from its 2015 highs. GILD is much larger than the penny stocks and it has even struggled relative to the overall stock market despite being extremely promising.

A few of the stocks you picked such as LIFE also have high expectations of increased value by analysts, but of course that is speculation based on the expected success of the trials as you mentioned.

I decided to use my money to invest in companies that have a lower risk-reward potential as there are still potential profits to be made with undervalued stocks in other industries that I won't worry as much about holding for years if I happen to buy at a bad time.
 

inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Haven't checked on PHI for a long time as I had thankfully sold, what the heck happened?!
Dilution and constant delays on financing. CEO keeps updating saying financing is coming SOON™, but it still has not come. He's constantly traveling allegedly doing SOMETHING (allegedly working with vietnamese and US govts), but he has not produced anything publicly but lowering the share price. I am still a bag holder, so I hope he can actually get something done.

 

FrancisK

Pelican
Catholic
Gold Member
Dilution and constant delays on financing. CEO keeps updating saying financing is coming SOON™, but it still has not come. He's constantly traveling allegedly doing SOMETHING (allegedly working with vietnamese and US govts), but he has not produced anything publicly but lowering the share price. I am still a bag holder, so I hope he can actually get something done.



Interesting that he's active on twitter like that....

I checked in thinking to buy back in, not so sure about that. Hope it bounces back for you brother!
 

inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Interesting that he's active on twitter like that....

I checked in thinking to buy back in, not so sure about that. Hope it bounces back for you brother!
Fortunately I don't invest money that I would care about if it went to zero. I've been averaging down as well with the leftover change from other trades.
 

Blade Runner

Hummingbird
Orthodox
How will the commodities speculation/exploration stocks (pennies) do if the tightening environment continues and/or the broader market drops 20-30% further? For example, gold/silver/copper/uranium/lithium? Will they be spared a bit, or will they drop because they are highly speculative companies with the hope of relatively big finds in order to propel them, so people stay away from them as being "too risky"?
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
How will the commodities speculation/exploration stocks (pennies) do if the tightening environment continues and/or the broader market drops 20-30% further? For example, gold/silver/copper/uranium/lithium? Will they be spared a bit, or will they drop because they are highly speculative companies with the hope of relatively big finds in order to propel them, so people stay away from them as being "too risky"?
From what I've heard, at first they will drop with the rest of the market. Then, as commodities, especially precious metals, start to rise in price, their values will rise in unison. There are some qualifying factors, however:

- Battery metal stocks are, of course, tied to the health of the electric car and renewable energy sectors. If the economic downturn sours those markets, then it may be awhile before the prices of battery metal mining stocks start to rise.

- Researchers are developing battery technologies which use less lithium, cobalt, and nickel, which my also affect the price of those commodities and the associated miners if the technology turns out to be viable.

- Many mining penny stocks are still years away from opening their mines, so the price of their stock is at least partially dependent on them getting a viable commercial enterprise going, even if the price of the underlying metal goes up in the meantime.

I'm currently holding around a hundred penny mining stocks in battery, precious metals, and rare earths miners. My own prediction is that those stocks, for the most part, are going to languish with the rest of the market for the remainder of this year. Sometime next year, when/if the price of gold, silver, and copper finally starts to go up significantly, the mining stocks that are in, or near, production will shoot up. The exploratory/prospective mining stocks may go up a little, but not as much.

I think if a Republican is elected US president in 2024, then we'll start coming out of the recession so we'll have the "perfect storm" of high metals prices combined with a bull market, which will produce some good valuations of many of these mining penny stocks.
 

Blade Runner

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I'm currently holding around a hundred penny mining stocks in battery, precious metals, and rare earths miners. My own prediction is that those stocks, for the most part, are going to languish with the rest of the market for the remainder of this year. Sometime next year, when/if the price of gold, silver, and copper finally starts to go up significantly, the mining stocks that are in, or near, production will shoot up. The exploratory/prospective mining stocks may go up a little, but not as much.
Thanks for the thoughtful reply. I tend to agree with this sentiment. As a 5 to 10 year hold, perhaps it doesn't matter - we may strike "gold." lol
 
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