Playing video games over 30

I'd like to share my own experience with video games, as I find some people quite close minded in this thread.
Don't take it personnaly, we all have different life experiences, so I can understand where you're coming from.
Just hear me out, please.


Video games can help people grow.
I don't say they always do, but they Can.

My current self-employed work has been heavily inspired by my video game practices.
I wouldn't have gotten there, if it wasn't for video games, period.


I enjoyed playing World of Warcraft, especially using the Auction house.
Using a program (Auctioneer if I remember correctly), I gradualy became one of the best resellers of my server.
I made thousands upon thousands of credits (don't remember this game currency, maybe gold).
Buying low, selling high, understanding each product's nich and needs, twisting the program's configuration to see the results, fascinating to me.

I also played Factorio, which teached me the Huge benefits of Automation.
Why do something manually, when a machine (or 1.000) can do it for you, Faster and Better?
How much can I scale a project, beginning with a little investment, and growing exponentially using automation machines?
Going from an empty hand to a rocket ship, Fascinating experience.

Recently, I created my own enterprise, which uses automated tools, in order to resell products. And I LOVE it.
Without my enjoyment of video games, I wouldn't be there, I wouldn't have understood I enjoyed doing these activities.


But what about FPS, and other "stupid" games, which don't teach you anything?
Playing these, you'll develop your eyes / hands coordination, just trying to become better at the game.
Wether you're conscious of it or not, this is usefull in your everyday life.

OK, so how about a game which doesn't develop your skills at all?
It can still teach you patience, give you the will to learn new mechanics.
Everytime I launch a new game, I'm "forced" to learn its new rules, making me create new neural routes in my brain.
Making my brain stay young, not doing always the same things, not using the same patterns, all the time.


Maybe you'll disagree with me, and it's totally fine.
Just remember this reality is much more complex that we think, there's no black or white, and so much to learn, so much we're not even aware of not knowing.
Thinking we Know is an Ego thing, nothing else.

Have a nice day, friends.
 

scorpion

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Over the past few years a lot of men woke up to the devastating impact that porn has on their lives. This was a painful realization for a lot of guys and is something that many (most?) men are in complete denial about. But the facts are what they are: porn is an awful drug that rewires a man's brain and robs him of fundamental aspects of his masculinity. Even more insidious, it does so while lulling him into a pleasurable stupor so that he does not even realize he has been grievously wounded, and will even lash out at anyone who attempts to separate him from the porn.

At some point people are going to recognize that as bad as porn is for men, video games are even worse. I realize that's a shocking statement, but I am confident I will be vindicated over the coming years. Video games are basically competency simulators that serve to distract men from developing skills and going after achievements in the real world in favor of quick dopamine hits for accomplishments in the virtual world. The long term effects of widespread video game playing are devastating on a societal scale, as this is literally no less than men checking out of society en masse. What happens when men don't give a shit about the real world and focus on their pixels instead? Women get out of control and foreigners take over. Sound familiar?

What's even worse is that so many boys get sucked into video games and never develop the normal skills of manhood. This is an epidemic. Video games are electronic drugs. Would you give a six year old boy heroin? Of course not. So why the hell would you give him a video game that will fry his dopamine receptors, render his attention span to zero and make him completely bored with meat space accomplishments that require actual effort, focus and discomfort to achieve?

I say all this as a guy who played video games as a kid and teenager and who still does a little bit. They're very fun and engaging. And in moderation they're fine. I'm not saying you can't be successful and have a good life while enjoying some video games. But millions of guys are not playing in moderation, and millions of young boys are frying their brains with them as we speak. It's not good. And it's only going to get worse when VR becomes the standard. We have to recognize the drug-like nature of video games, and keep them away from children especially.
 

jimukr75

Sparrow
Latan said:
I'd like to share my own experience with video games, as I find some people quite close minded in this thread.
Don't take it personnaly, we all have different life experiences, so I can understand where you're coming from.
Just hear me out, please.


Video games can help people grow.
I don't say they always do, but they Can.

My current self-employed work has been heavily inspired by my video game practices.
I wouldn't have gotten there, if it wasn't for video games, period.


I enjoyed playing World of Warcraft, especially using the Auction house.
Using a program (Auctioneer if I remember correctly), I gradualy became one of the best resellers of my server.
I made thousands upon thousands of credits (don't remember this game currency, maybe gold).
Buying low, selling high, understanding each product's nich and needs, twisting the program's configuration to see the results, fascinating to me.

I also played Factorio, which teached me the Huge benefits of Automation.
Why do something manually, when a machine (or 1.000) can do it for you, Faster and Better?
How much can I scale a project, beginning with a little investment, and growing exponentially using automation machines?
Going from an empty hand to a rocket ship, Fascinating experience.

Recently, I created my own enterprise, which uses automated tools, in order to resell products. And I LOVE it.
Without my enjoyment of video games, I wouldn't be there, I wouldn't have understood I enjoyed doing these activities.


But what about FPS, and other "stupid" games, which don't teach you anything?
Playing these, you'll develop your eyes / hands coordination, just trying to become better at the game.
Wether you're conscious of it or not, this is usefull in your everyday life.

OK, so how about a game which doesn't develop your skills at all?
It can still teach you patience, give you the will to learn new mechanics.
Everytime I launch a new game, I'm "forced" to learn its new rules, making me create new neural routes in my brain.
Making my brain stay young, not doing always the same things, not using the same patterns, all the time.


Maybe you'll disagree with me, and it's totally fine.
Just remember this reality is much more complex that we think, there's no black or white, and so much to learn, so much we're not even aware of not knowing.
Thinking we Know is an Ego thing, nothing else.

Have a nice day, friends.

The US Army uses games to recruit. FPS and strategy games are also good for old people. The nursing homes are adding them.

I think the problem with some posters here is that they are under the belief that the video games are stopping the people playing them from going out in real world but I think it is the same people who before would just sit in their room watching tv or listening to music. They just have a third choice now. Also there is a social aspect to games. When I grew up we played stick ball on the street and rode bikes. This was in Brooklyn. Has anyone seen Brooklyn lately? There is no room to ride bikes or to play stick ball. The playgrounds are full of Mexican migrants playing hoops.

As for those over 30, life is better. As has been said in other threads most women maintain friends and most men don't. They have work chat and then are forced to socialize with wife's friends. Any one married over 30 knows the deal.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
Up through my early twenties I loved playing games, but now that I'm over 30 I no longer enjoy them much any more. I lack the patience to figure out more complicated RPGs and that sort of thing. I have a Switch and PS4, but barely use either of them. I just don't find games to be anywhere near as fun as I used to. I've always enjoyed reading, but nowadays I find it more fun than playing games. The vast majority of big-name, AAA titles bore me, and flashy graphics don't interest me. Doom Eternal is about the only one I'm interested in playing.

I should note, however, that I only play single-player or local multiplayer games like Mario Kart. I never enjoyed online gaming or things like MMORPGs. I have little sympathy for games like Fortnite that are simply addiction generators.
 

jimukr75

Sparrow
^^^^Yeah, I don't have the patience either. Any interest I get is over in 5 minutes. But I think games were better at one point and now, like you said, have the agenda to create addictions. At our age, politics becomes important and financial stuff and many over 30 spend time with that.
 

SilentOne

Woodpecker
jimukr75 said:
^^^^Yeah, I don't have the patience either. Any interest I get is over in 5 minutes. But I think games were better at one point and now, like you said, have the agenda to create addictions. At our age, politics becomes important and financial stuff and many over 30 spend time with that.

Well i agree about finances being important, but let's not get carried away with politics. Maybe local politics there is some choice, but the bigger leagues like the president, you have no choice. Your vote is nothing but a popularity contest. The electoral college chooses.

Some people like reading books, some like watching movies, some like keeping up with politics, some like playing games. Its all the same, just do it in moderation.
 
For me, it definitely falls into the net negative category, although mileage may vary.

Gaming for me started with a Gameboy Color that I won in a contest when I was no older than 4 or 5 years old. Although if we are being technical I think I was playing PC games by 2, no later than 3. After the Gameboy, it naturally progressed into a nintendo 64. Shortly after this the 64 went obsolete, so I went back to the PC--but, by this time the PS2 had been released. I must have gotten one within the year. There was no turning back at this point. The thing was so engrossing to me in a way that the Nintendo or PC had never been. I was saving up money every month for new games and that was it. My parents were very strict about technology in the house, so I would eagerly wait for neither of them to be there, and I would go on gaming binges. They remained Nazis when they were at the house, but when they were not, I went to town.

By the time I had progressed to middle school the PS3 had been released. It was an easy choice at that point to upgrade. I was very bookish at the time, so the other hobby I had was playing the PS3, those were the two things I did with downtime. None of my friends lived near me, so a lot of it was playing with them online. The problem here is, I guess, being in Middle school I should have been more social, going out with friends, but for me and many other guys, the video games presented themselves to be a better, easier alternative. There's not much that parallels the feeling that you get in COD when you pull off a headshot with a sniper rifle, or defuse the bomb in search in destroy, etc.

I should also say I was pretty big into Ruinscape for several years, and that ended when I got in trouble at school for visiting a ruinscape fansite; pretty lame, I know. For me there was just something mind-boggling about being on a server of 2000 people from all over the world playing simultaneously and constructing an online identity.

By the time I was ending middle school I had really gotten into COD. Any free time I had was allocated to gaming. My parents were yelling at me in the middle of the night that I could not stay up all night playing video games. In high school i took off some time from gaming and never started again. Looking in the mirror now, I can recognize that I never went back because I knew how much time was wasted. I don't have any games any more. For some people they can moderate, while others can not. It especially irks me guys in their early 20s who have their whole lives ahead of them, should be in top physical condition, chasing tail, putting in hours at work stacking cash, put instead are gaming. Or who could be drinking at bars meeting people and developing skills. I look at a good portion of gamers as being equivalent to heroin addicts. They are pitiful human beings who don't even have the self-awareness to realize how pathetic their habit looks. Their whole life implodes around them, or perhaps fails to ever take off, but that is ok, just as long as they have their vidya.

It's rather funny, I still remember the feeling or high that video games gave me. It's a lightness in the chest, my brain racing, and then finally a dopamine release--and most damning that sense of accomplishment. Since quitting gaming, I have sought out the feeling again and again. Competitive sports, physical sparring, adventure sports, drinking, smoking, women. I will tell you that while all these pursuits give you the same feeling, the only one that really makes you feel empty is gaming (and of course the other obvious culprit, porn). I shudder to think of how damning VR and VR porn will be to this upcoming generation. Gaming channels the most productive male urges, makes you feel like you've done something, but in reality you've done nothing. You're empty.
 

wwtl

Kingfisher
Lost in Transfiguration said:
By the time I had progressed to middle school the PS3 had been released. It was an easy choice at that point to upgrade. I was very bookish at the time, so the other hobby I had was playing the PS3, those were the two things I did with downtime. None of my friends lived near me, so a lot of it was playing with them online. The problem here is, I guess, being in Middle school I should have been more social, going out with friends, but for me and many other guys, the video games presented themselves to be a better, easier alternative. There's not much that parallels the feeling that you get in COD when you pull off a headshot with a sniper rifle, or defuse the bomb in search in destroy, etc.

Something I just found out recently after getting reborn in Christ was that video games cut into my limited budget of "social time". If I waste it on video games, my social game suffers heavily.

It's rather funny, I still remember the feeling or high that video games gave me. It's a lightness in the chest, my brain racing, and then finally a dopamine release--and most damning that sense of accomplishment. Since quitting gaming, I have sought out the feeling again and again. Competitive sports, physical sparring, adventure sports, drinking, smoking, women. I will tell you that while all these pursuits give you the same feeling, the only one that really makes you feel empty is gaming (and of course the other obvious culprit, porn). I shudder to think of how damning VR and VR porn will be to this upcoming generation. Gaming channels the most productive male urges, makes you feel like you've done something, but in reality you've done nothing. You're empty.

As with any drug at some point you become numb. Then you increase the dose using VR until it doesn't flash you anymore as well. Then you become depressed and start thinking about suicide.

I always used video games "in moderation" (few hours per week), yet I got pretty attached to my "collection", but I just made the choice to uninstall everything from my PC and consoles. When I'm finished I will check if it feels like a relief or like a mistake. I'm already looking forward to Terabytes of free hard drive space.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
Getting older has made me much more conscious of how little time we really have - not just in life, but in a single day. The hours in the afternoon I might play a game would be much better spent learning how to play a song on guitar, or writing my own. Those are are real, tangible accomplishments that develop skills and a sense of achievement. Or I could read any number of great works of literature I haven't yet, or something like theology. Playing games cuts into the time for all of that.

I didn't think about it much when I was a teenager or in college because I could easily spend tons of time gaming and also read, play guitar, and do schoolwork, but at 30+ you really become aware of how little time (and attention span) you've really got.
 
I'm playing Tetris these days and Tetris is definitely like life.

Whenever you think everything is fucked you still hang on to make that extra line and another and it makes all the difference between losing and winning.

Sometimes when the game speed is really fast the shape you thought you put at the right place is put somewhere else and it ruins your plan but
1. You have no time to whine
2. It's unfair but the game doesn't give a shit
3. So you keep moving on.

And of course you have to plan your moves to succeed.
 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member
I'm playing Tetris these days and Tetris is definitely like life.

Whenever you think everything is fucked you still hang on to make that extra line and another and it makes all the difference between losing and winning.

Sometimes when the game speed is really fast the shape you thought you put at the right place is put somewhere else and it ruins your plan but
1. You have no time to whine
2. It's unfair but the game doesn't give a shit
3. So you keep moving on.

And of course you have to plan your moves to succeed.
The new Tetris game is pretty wild...
 

eradicator

Peacock
Gold Member
I have far less time for them but I still have a ps4 and a gaming quality pc.

Witcher 3 was amazing
Ghosts of Tsushima and god of war, also amazing

I’ll get the reboots for mass effect as it too was a really good trilogy

But I just don’t have time for them the way I used to. If I had kids I’d likely have to give games all up for time reasons
 

Steiner

Sparrow
Some people never repelled the Covenant attack on Earth and IT SHOWS


Watching a movie = playing a video game to me.
Some can be art, some can be garbage.
Some can engage your mind, some can turn it to mush.

There are worse ways to pass a little time. Just don't make it the ONLY way you do
 

Sinabelus

Sparrow
I understand the criticism against video games, and most of them are actually valid, but as a heavy gamer myself I feel I must temperate some of the harsher viewpoints. I agree that it can suck you in, often times it sucked me and it still does sometimes ; and although some of that time I consider lost it is only a sacrifice for some of the true goods I got with some games. I have played a lot of games, and I find myself coming back every once in a while to my childhood games instead of the more modern, although some of them have their merits. Games have brought a lot, and although I play much less now, I think they will always remain as having played a part in my personality.

If you've never felt the joy of being immersed in Skyrim's world, with the incredible music and sense of purpose, or have experienced incredible stories told through the medium of video games then you can't know. There is definitely some escapism in a lot of games, but it's not as mindless as people think it is. Skyrim, for instance, has allowed me to formulate my lust for a purpose beyond myself that maybe I wouldn't have been able to pinpoint as precisely. When I listen to its OST, it brings me a feeling of peace that few other things can match. Introverts will always hide in their houses, reading or doing whatever, now they're just playing alone. Extroverts will still go out. Video games can be an art form.

In an ideal world we wouldn't need them, or should I say young men would not dive in them never to return. The fact that some men actually put too much in themselves in video games is only a symptom of a society so broken that video games are a necessary relief. How could it not? In real life you as a man are shunned, told you're useless, demasculinized, belittled, denied everything that is good and purposeful. And when you launch a game you're suddenly someone with incredible potential, the saviour of the world, etc etc. Of course young men will jump into them. But the cause is not video games themselves. It's this shitty world. Of course this is a trap, and I thank God for making me realise this, but it doesn't change the fact that when you play a game you used to play, you reconnect with that younger self and sometimes that's exactly what you need to, for lack of a better world, cope with everything, as long as your life does not revolve around them and you're not sacrificing what's actually important.
 

Ludelos

Sparrow
I used to play dota 2 and League of Legends during my college days. Hard to believe I spent so many all nighters playing matches. I even enjoyed watching the esports pro matches to improve my game.

It was fun for a while and even addicting but I came to realize it was such a time suck. MOBA games take up so much time since each match takes 40-80 minutes to complete and it's not satisfying unless you get 2-3 matches in for a quick session. I even stopped playing other games on steam with my friends. I'll play some old games on my Wii every now and then or play with a friend while hanging out on his switch or ps4. There's just so many things to do as an adult. I'd feel guilty about spending so much time playing video games. I rather do other things like listen to podcasts, go on dates, play tennis, anything else really.
 
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