Powerlifting

Good_Shepherd

Kingfisher
Orthodox Catechumen
Any chances for a 40 year old with a sedetary lifestyle and no energy to start lifting seriously?
Asking for a friend.
Tell your friend he will start getting energy the more he trains, to revive your mental energy and get you going again start reading the bronze age mindset book and just start training, if you dont have any equipment do pushups, sit ups, squats and jumps, find a tree or something and do chin ups, a skipping rope also good to get those lungs going and oxygen in
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
What helped me in my workout, my thinking, was book called Body by Science, the guys on there only train 12min a week, once a week, thats it, for someone like me with not too much free time it helped me a lot, they explained a lot about rest after training, reduces injuries, they explained that a lot of world records in athletes happened after they came back from injury, their bodies had a chance to recover properly and they performed super well. Lately iv been training well, just need to get myself a punching bag again I miss the hard kicking and punching, its so important to also be able to fight too, I still shadow box and kick but you need that bag to go out full force. In the past I used to play soccer 3 times a week, on the off week days I did weights at home and off season I went to a kockboxing gym twice a week and we used to spar at the end of trainings it was really great I need to get back to that level, I was so fit that even when I was in a car accident without wearing a seatbelt in those days (I never wore seatbelts) the doctor who stiched me gave me pain pills to take said I would be in a lot of pain because of whip lash, I didnt take anything and had no pain at all
12 minutes a week is not going to do anythign for powerlifting,

Where the goal is to increase your 1 rep maximum on your squat/bench/deadlift.

The MMA stuff you mentioned is fine for GPP, but you need to be getting in roughly 3-4 hours of lifting a week for growth of muscle and CNS stimulation.

For me to work up to a top single in a Squat/Deadlift/Bench, it usually takes between 10-20 minutes depending on how quickly I am getting through my warm up sets and how much activation of the CNS I need.

So good advice for someont with OTHER goals than powerlifting maybe... but not applicable for this thread.

If you want a scientific book on training, you should get Louie Simmons "Book of Methods" which is a readable book that makes sense of soviet strength science and gives you perioidization and exercise selection advice to AVOID being over trained.

 

Good_Shepherd

Kingfisher
Orthodox Catechumen
12 minutes a week is not going to do anythign for powerlifting,

Where the goal is to increase your 1 rep maximum on your squat/bench/deadlift.

The MMA stuff you mentioned is fine for GPP, but you need to be getting in roughly 3-4 hours of lifting a week for growth of muscle and CNS stimulation.

For me to work up to a top single in a Squat/Deadlift/Bench, it usually takes between 10-20 minutes depending on how quickly I am getting through my warm up sets and how much activation of the CNS I need.

So good advice for someont with OTHER goals than powerlifting maybe... but not applicable for this thread.

If you want a scientific book on training, you should get Louie Simmons "Book of Methods" which is a readable book that makes sense of soviet strength science and gives you perioidization and exercise selection advice to AVOID being over trained.

i will have to read the book, thanks, just shared that 12min thing because not everyone has a lot of free time and some people think they need to spend days at the guy everyweek so they throw in the towl, I have more free time now but at one stage I didnt and the 12min thing helped me maintain, for example Im almost 40 years old and I still wear the same waist size pants as when I was 19
 

Diadem

Woodpecker
Orthodox
This means your GPP sucks.
I somehow doubt that. My profession is landscaping, so I'm physically active much of the day. If fact, the job combined with lifting might be why I'm not recovering. The only other reason I could think of is the medication I have to take for a psychiatric illness; there's no telling what that stuff is doing to my insides.
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I somehow doubt that. My profession is landscaping, so I'm physically active much of the day. If fact, the job combined with lifting might be why I'm not recovering. The only other reason I could think of is the medication I have to take for a psychiatric illness; there's no telling what that stuff is doing to my insides.
Keep in mind having a labor intensive job means you might be in shape for work but not in shape for lifting maximal weights.

When I was in the Marines and doing lots of long cardio sessions I would get buried if I lift like I do now.

That said, without enough info it's one of a few things:
-CNS is fried because you're not recovered (sleep/nutrition/too many reps over 90 percent)
-GPP
-Frequency/Volume is too high

Are you eating enough?
Are you taking in enough salt?
Are you taking in sufficient nutrition around/during your workouts? For instance I take an electrolyte drink + 25g carbs and 25 g whey hydroslyate during the work out... This helps a lot.
 

bucky

Hummingbird
Other Christian
12 minutes a week is not going to do anythign for powerlifting,

Where the goal is to increase your 1 rep maximum on your squat/bench/deadlift.

The MMA stuff you mentioned is fine for GPP, but you need to be getting in roughly 3-4 hours of lifting a week for growth of muscle and CNS stimulation.

For me to work up to a top single in a Squat/Deadlift/Bench, it usually takes between 10-20 minutes depending on how quickly I am getting through my warm up sets and how much activation of the CNS I need.

So good advice for someont with OTHER goals than powerlifting maybe... but not applicable for this thread.

If you want a scientific book on training, you should get Louie Simmons "Book of Methods" which is a readable book that makes sense of soviet strength science and gives you perioidization and exercise selection advice to AVOID being over trained.

Yes, it seems like guys post here pretty frequently with questions and ideas about weight training for general fitness rather than powerlifting, probably because this thread is pretty active. Looks like "Lifter's Lounge" still gets posted to sometimes, as recently as a few weeks ago. That would probably be a better place for posts not directly related to powerlifting:

 

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
Any chances for a 40 year old with a sedetary lifestyle and no energy to start lifting seriously?
Asking for a friend.
Certainly.

I'm slightly younger than you but due to huge workload/hours at my previous job and having two very young children, I gave up the gym and exercise for a few years.

Around March I started again. Within 30-60 days if consistent (4X week plus some form of cardio) it becomes such a habit your body is accustomed to that you feel worse on days you don't exercise. Your sleep is worse to.

By about 90 days your clothes will really start fitting differently if you're eating healthy as well.

6 months it's just part of your lifestyle and you now consider yourself just a fit and active person.

Now's actually a great time to start. By spring you'll look different, feel much better and want to get outside and hike/bike/run.

I would advise against any of these gimmick 10 min workouts. Defeats the purpose. You want to look forward to exercise/gym/lifting. You want to get to the point that you just block out 60 mins a day for physical activity, because both mentally and physically you feel better during and after. Doesn't mean you literally exercise an hr each day but I think you get my point. Activity simply increases overall health many fold so you want to enjoy being active.
 
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KomnenAl

Robin
Orthodox
Thanks, that's exactly what I needed to hear.

How do you guys combine lifting with fasting? I'm asking because we are entering the Nativity fast, which is lighter than Lent since we can actually eat fish in most days, so I'd guess it's doable to start lifting now.
 
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Diadem

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Thanks, that's exactly what I needed to hear.

How do you guys combine lifting with fasting? I'm asking because we are entering the Nativity fast, which is lighter than Lent since we can actually eat fish in most days, so I'd guess it's doable to start lifting now.
You might be able to get a blessing from your priest to eat fish, and perhaps even to take some whey. The fasting rules can sometimes be adjusted in case of need. I've even seen this done in monasteries where fish was allowed on fasting days for the brothers who were doing physical labor.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
If one is going to do both barbell and dumbbell lifts, like say, barbell bench press and dumbbell bench press, which is better to do first, barbell or dumbbell? Or does it matter?
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
If one is going to do both barbell and dumbbell lifts, like say, barbell bench press and dumbbell bench press, which is better to do first, barbell or dumbbell? Or does it matter?
Do the barbell first then dumbbell.

Barbell is going to be a heaver load overall.

Doing the db afterwards because it will also work stabilizers.

It's a lot harder to be bench 125 lb dumbbells compared to 250 on barbell weight for reps.
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
Thanks, that's exactly what I needed to hear.

How do you guys combine lifting with fasting? I'm asking because we are entering the Nativity fast, which is lighter than Lent since we can actually eat fish in most days, so I'd guess it's doable to start lifting now.
Plenty of people who lift eat lots of fish. Fish plus rice is sufficient for recovery.

Carbohydrates are really more important for recovery than pure protein.... You just need around. .8g /lb of lean mass if you're adding lots of carbs since they are protein sparing
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Pelican
Catholic
Gold Member
Do the barbell first then dumbbell.

Barbell is going to be a heaver load overall.

Doing the db afterwards because it will also work stabilizers.

It's a lot harder to be bench 125 lb dumbbells compared to 250 on barbell weight for reps.

I've found as a rough rule of thumb I can usually bench X lb dumbbells for about the same number of reps as I can a barbell with that weight in plates on each side. IE a 225lb barbell bench (which if you exclude the 45lb bar is 90lbs of plates on each side) is roughly the equivalent of 90lb dumbbells.

Just a general rule and it might break down as you get into really heavy weights, but worth trying to see if it gets you in the ballpark to start.
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I've found as a rough rule of thumb I can usually bench X lb dumbbells for about the same number of reps as I can a barbell with that weight in plates on each side. IE a 225lb barbell bench (which if you exclude the 45lb bar is 90lbs of plates on each side) is roughly the equivalent of 90lb dumbbells.

Just a general rule and it might break down as you get into really heavy weights, but worth trying to see if it gets you in the ballpark to start.
That works for stuff that's in the novice range but once you get more intermediate and advanced it doesn't hold true.

If your max bench is 300 lbs, trying to stabilize 150s is going to be very very hard.
 

Diadem

Woodpecker
Orthodox
How often should intermediate/advanced lifters be deadlifting? I'm on a four day split and have been alternating haltings/rack pulls on Mondays with deadlift on Thursdays, but I'm not always able to "go heavy" on deadlift (I suppose due to me being 40 yrs. old). I think I heard Rip saying on his podcast recently that older men can only deadlift once every 4 weeks or somethings like that, which surprised me and made me wonder if I should scale back on my pulling movements.
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Pelican
Catholic
Gold Member
That works for stuff that's in the novice range but once you get more intermediate and advanced it doesn't hold true.

If your max bench is 300 lbs, trying to stabilize 150s is going to be very very hard.

Plates only/excluding the bar though. So a 300lb barbell bench minus the 45lb bar is 127.5lbs on each side or 125/130lb dumbbells. Still probably breaks down as you get heavier but realistically most guys aren't ever going to bench more than 300.
 
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