Powerlifting

get2choppaaa

Pelican
If you do some research into congugate method and training you'll find that you can build muscle and strength with limited get gain through diet.

Its the best form of programing out there for multiple goals.

Buy louie simmons book of 3 or watch him or matt wenning or Dave Tate explain Congugate method.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Powerlifting programs focus on maximizing 1RM on 3 static lifts. I like Alan Thrall's program that he has on Barbell Medicine because it will develop general strength and conditioning, while having a strongman focus. Strongman develops dynamic strength alongside static strength. However, in the end, it's all about what your goals are and what you enjoy doing in the gym.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
Powerlifting programs focus on maximizing 1RM on 3 static lifts. I like Alan Thrall's program that he has on Barbell Medicine because it will develop general strength and conditioning, while having a strongman focus. Strongman develops dynamic strength alongside static strength. However, in the end, it's all about what your goals are and what you enjoy doing in the gym.
Congugate is not only the big 3, but about 20 other movement patterns. It was designed in Soviet Union for ALL athletes
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
I have heard of it, but never tried it myself. I see Brian Alsruhe has a video on it:
Ashrule is great, a really quality person and very good for education. I think I posted one of his videos about the BO Row earlier.. He is big into giant set training which is excellent for building your cardiovascular capacity and functional strenght.

Speaking of, This is the best tool for both upper body and lower body conditioning.


You can get a prowler if you have the money, but they are too taxing for a lot of people on the CNS.

A sled is where it is at.

When I first got back into powerlifting after having a pertty serious back injury post Military, I started just pulling sleds to traction my back and also did a lot of reverse hyper work. After 3 months of just sleds and reverse hypers I was back full form after having spent the 6 months or so before that spending about 1500 in chiropractor visits.

You can also use it for upper body.

 

bucky

Ostrich
Added Close Grip Bench Press to work the triceps and man are they burning. Gonna keep this in the routine for sure.
Out of the scope of powerlifting, but you might consider adding diamond push-ups to your routine. I find they're great for triceps, and an added bonus is that they're easier on the shoulders than other types of push-ups. When I've had to work through shoulder problems in the past, I've found I can push pretty hard on diamond push-ups even when regular push-ups and chest presses are aggravating my shoulders.

Bar dips too, although I imagine you're already doing them if you're trying to develop your triceps. I find they're one of the best exercises for developing your triceps and upper body in general, but you have to be careful not to hurt your shoulders by going too deep and too hard.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
Out of the scope of powerlifting, but you might consider adding diamond push-ups to your routine. I find they're great for triceps, and an added bonus is that they're easier on the shoulders than other types of push-ups. When I've had to work through shoulder problems in the past, I've found I can push pretty hard on diamond push-ups even when regular push-ups and chest presses are aggravating my shoulders.

Bar dips too, although I imagine you're already doing them if you're trying to develop your triceps. I find they're one of the best exercises for developing your triceps and upper body in general, but you have to be careful not to hurt your shoulders by going too deep and too hard.
Close Grip Pushups/Diamond Pushups are excellent for a finisher.

Dips hit all 3 heads of the triceps, and weighted dips are especially effective for pec/shoulder/tricep growth as long as your shoulders tolerate. They are sometimes referred to as "the upper body squat" and very popular with classic bodybuilders like Vince Gironda.

One of the things I did when in the military every morning after getting out of bed was to do 5 rounds of pullups and close grip pushups or regular pushups all with a given number in mind, I would usually try and hit somewhere around 75 pullups and 125-150 pushups back when i was doing these regularly. This added lots of volume over time. You can also get a band and attach it to a post/bar and do press downs in sets of 50-100 on every off day. This again will get lots of blood into the area and facilitate recovery as well as tendon strength/development. Doing these will in no way be deleterious to your given bodypart work out after you have accumulated a little adaptation to it.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Ashrule is great, a really quality person and very good for education. I think I posted one of his videos about the BO Row earlier.. He is big into giant set training which is excellent for building your cardiovascular capacity and functional strenght.

Speaking of, This is the best tool for both upper body and lower body conditioning.


You can get a prowler if you have the money, but they are too taxing for a lot of people on the CNS.

A sled is where it is at.

When I first got back into powerlifting after having a pertty serious back injury post Military, I started just pulling sleds to traction my back and also did a lot of reverse hyper work. After 3 months of just sleds and reverse hypers I was back full form after having spent the 6 months or so before that spending about 1500 in chiropractor visits.

You can also use it for upper body.

Brian and Alan Thrall are the only two "fitness" Youtubers I follow. They are both Strongman, which I like, and they balance conditioning with strength.

I've used the sled, but have never programmed them into my training programs. Interesting to hear that the sled is good for back injury. I heard the reverse hyper is good for it, but never the sled.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
Brian and Alan Thrall are the only two "fitness" Youtubers I follow. They are both Strongman, which I like, and they balance conditioning with strength.

I've used the sled, but have never programmed them into my training programs. Interesting to hear that the sled is good for back injury. I heard the reverse hyper is good for it, but never the sled.
Its great to use for either off day recovery with lighter loads or directly after heavy Squat/Deadlift work or also as a warm up.

For instance I did yesterday:
Safety Bar Squat
Warm up sets to 3x5
Safety Bar Good Morning
Warm up to 2 heavy sets 6-10 reps
Reverse Hypers
3x20 heavy
Sleds forward pulls heavy
4 Trips (60 yards there and 60 yards back)


On top of all the direct lfiting, the concentric only heavy sled work builds the Calves, hamstrings, and the glutes. Some days I'll just do 6-10 heavy sled trips. IT will DESTROY your glutes. Like to the point you cramp going up stairs in your glutes. It will also pump the crap out of your lower back.

Louie Simmons said that he thinks heavy sled pulls made him stronger than Squating or Deadlifting ever did as far as length of time invested vs return.
 
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