Powerlifting

bucky

Ostrich
Gonna shoot for 185 deadlift today. It’s only my third time deadlifting but I’m confident I can do this if I can squat and hip thrust 215.
Good luck, and take it slow with the deadlift. I used to do multiple low-rep sets with over 300 when I was a younger and much more naive natty ectomorph. Then I ended up in the emergency room. Looking back, that was probably where I started questioning the point of trying to become a human forklift.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Appreciate the heads up. I did 115 first time, and 155 second time, so I think 185 should be doable without injury. If not I’ll go down to 165 or 175.
Form and not allowing yourself to slip into ego lifting are very important on all lifts, but especially on the dead lift. For what it's worth I find Romanian dead lifts with dumbbells to be far safer and easier on my lower back than standard barbell dead lifts.
 

jarlo

Woodpecker
A while back I badly strained my lower back deadlifting 225 due to terrible form, and then while recovering decided to research form properly on all my lifts. My favorite videos are from Alan Thrall. I've been using his advice injury free up to a 4+ plate deadlift:

 

redonion

Woodpecker
No offense but if you are benching 225 and haven't deadlifted 185 yet something is very wrong. Either you have extreme imbalances, or you're cheating your bench reps.

I'm not sure if even the biggest bench specialists have a higher bench than deadlift, nevermind 25% stronger. Have you been benching for years but never deadlifted?
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Good luck, and take it slow with the deadlift. I used to do multiple low-rep sets with over 300 when I was a younger and much more naive natty ectomorph. Then I ended up in the emergency room. Looking back, that was probably where I started questioning the point of trying to become a human forklift.
Not as bad as you, but the deadlift was the only lift where I hurt myself. Tweaked my back. It's now my best lift, but that's because I spent HOURS on form and accessory work. Deadlift (especially if it's conventional) is the one lift I would recommend taking your time with it.
 
No offense but if you are benching 225 and haven't deadlifted 185 yet something is very wrong. Either you have extreme imbalances, or you're cheating your bench reps.

I'm not sure if even the biggest bench specialists have a higher bench than deadlift, nevermind 25% stronger. Have you been benching for years but never deadlifted?

Yes, due to my lower back problems I avoided any sort of deadlift until two weeks ago when I got a hex bar. Did 115 first week, 155 the second week, and just did 185 for 3 sets of 8 reps. It’s tough but I’m still getting used to the movement.
 

redonion

Woodpecker
Yes, due to my lower back problems I avoided any sort of deadlift until two weeks ago when I got a hex bar. Did 115 first week, 155 the second week, and just did 185 for 3 sets of 8 reps. It’s tough but I’m still getting used to the movement.

You'll be above 225 in no time then, you have the strength in you with jumps like that.

IMO the best way to stay injury-free on the deadlift is to work on bracing. This means:
1) Wear a lifting belt
2) Get a big belly full of air - take a deep breath and make sure it's in your diaphragm
3) Push your abdomen out HARD against the belt. This needs to be around the full circumference of your waist. This means belly, back, and both sides.

If you do the above you'll be very safe, and your deadlift will shoot up. Check out videos on bracing for more info. Here's a good one:
 
Thanks, yeah I think if I can lift 185 on my third time ever touching the bar then 225 can’t be far away. I’ll order a lifting belt before I push any further.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
I should mention also that I’m using a hex bar and not a barbell, so not sure how much that changes the advice in the video.
I would not use the hex bar personally. I haven't found it to be any easier on the back and it doesnt not sync/train the muscles in the same manner. It is better than not doing anything at all.... but a straight bar deadlift (conventional or sumo) is a better way to train your back,

I found squatting to be more injurious than deadlifting when it comes to form being sloppy/not bracing ect...

I literally couldn't bend over and tie my shoes at one point. I did reverse hypers and deadlifts with proper form, and sled dragging. Now my back pain is either non-existent or a 1/10 for 95% of the time where as 2 years ago I was spending hundreds of dollars a month at chiropractors ect....

I don't know the history of injury, but speaking for myself... getting back to pulling heavy deadlifts (2xbodyweight+) has strengthened my back better than any other things I've done. But I had to start slow, and focus on form.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
I would not use the hex bar personally. I haven't found it to be any easier on the back and it doesnt not sync/train the muscles in the same manner. It is better than not doing anything at all.... but a straight bar deadlift (conventional or sumo) is a better way to train your back,

I found squatting to be more injurious than deadlifting when it comes to form being sloppy/not bracing ect...

I literally couldn't bend over and tie my shoes at one point. I did reverse hypers and deadlifts with proper form, and sled dragging. Now my back pain is either non-existent or a 1/10 for 95% of the time where as 2 years ago I was spending hundreds of dollars a month at chiropractors ect....

I don't know the history of injury, but speaking for myself... getting back to pulling heavy deadlifts (2xbodyweight+) has strengthened my back better than any other things I've done. But I had to start slow, and focus on form.
I had a different experience. I used a hex bar to progress back to a deadlift. I did 3 weeks with the high handle, then 3 weeks with the lower handle, and then back to a straight bar deadlift. I also worked in rack pulls at different heights, straight bar deadlifts at different heights (18 inch and 16 inch), and accessory deadlift work like deficit deadlifts and band deadlifts. I will say that my back pain wasn't that severe, but I do think the hex bar is a good option because it doesn't force you into a comprised position like the straight bar deadlift, and it still works the lower back. With that said, everyone is different, so what works for me, might not work for someone else.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
I had a different experience. I used a hex bar to progress back to a deadlift. I did 3 weeks with the high handle, then 3 weeks with the lower handle, and then back to a straight bar deadlift. I also worked in rack pulls at different heights, straight bar deadlifts at different heights (18 inch and 16 inch), and accessory deadlift work like deficit deadlifts and band deadlifts. I will say that my back pain wasn't that severe, but I do think the hex bar is a good option because it doesn't force you into a comprised position like the straight bar deadlift, and it still works the lower back. With that said, everyone is different, so what works for me, might not work for someone else.
Yes, but this is after you have experience doing regular (conventional) deadlifts. So presumably you have already built the motor patterns and gotten use out of the training stimulus and are not in the beginner phase.

Agreed it can force you into a compromised position, but only if you are going beyond technical failure. If you're keeping your form tight, and actually lifting within the capacity of the tissues, you'd be fine.

Trap bar was called the center of mass bar originally, as it provides different levers than the barbell.

It is good for variation, I have done the change from high to low handle ect... its just like doing rack pulls from different heights. So it can serve a place.

My point is early on that one should spend the time to learn the proper way to do it. For those who are using the powerlifts for hypertrophy and functional training, a model like proposed in SS where you are increasing 5 lbs a work out will take you from 135 to 300 in 33 weeks. (assuming youre just doing 5 lbs a work out)
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Anyone going to watch the World Ultimate Strongman on Saturday? I think it's being broadcast for free on the Rogue YouTube channel. It's the first major Strongman show this year, and I'm pretty pumped for it.
 
Picked up an Element 26 lifting belt that feels solid but I’m not sure how to “use” it exactly. Once it’s on do I have to do something different to stabilize and lift better or does its mere presence provide support in terms of injury prevention?

Edit: Just found this video. Do you guys think he’s right?
 
Last edited:

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Picked up an Element 26 lifting belt that feels solid but I’m not sure how to “use” it exactly. Once it’s on do I have to do something different to stabilize and lift better or does its mere presence provide support in terms of injury prevention?

Edit: Just found this video. Do you guys think he’s right?
Yeah, Alan Thrall is legit. I would just listen to him.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Kingfisher
Guys, please be careful powerlifting.

Squats (probably incorrectly) left me with muscle spasms that I have yet to recover from.

From now on, I just do pull-ups, push-ups, and bodyweight squats.
 

jarlo

Woodpecker
Guys, please be careful powerlifting.

Squats (probably incorrectly) left me with muscle spasms that I have yet to recover from.

From now on, I just do pull-ups, push-ups, and bodyweight squats.
What/how were you squatting? That's an uncommon outcome from lifting. At times I'd gotten cramps due to electrolyte deficiencies, but I've never heard of squat induced muscle spasms.
 
Top