Powerlifting

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
I would say a high training volume at a high intensity (lot of limit triples and fives) is harder on your body than one rep max once a week.
I cannot really think of a high level athlete that hurt himself with rep work, but many athletes come to mind that have had serious injuries with doing 1RM. Rob Kearney blew out his triceps on a max log lift. Brian Shaw destroyed his hamstring on a heavy deadlift. Laurence Shahlaei blew out his back on a 1RM deadlift. I've seen powerlifters blow out both quads on a heavy squat. Pecs on a heavy bench. etc, etc. Your body can handle rep work at lower weights if you progress properly. However, 1RMs are designed to test the absolute limit of your body, which is when you see the nasty injuries.
 
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get2choppaaa

Pelican
I would say a high training volume at a high intensity (lot of limit triples and fives) is harder on your body than one rep max once a week.
What people should look at if looking for strength is Prelepin's chart for minimal/maximal exertions.

Maxing out weekly in *different exercises is a way different experience than maxing out weekly in the same exercise. For example a bench max then a ohp max then a fat bar max then a football bar max are going to give you variety and teach you to strain vs a weekly bench max which will make you worn out
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
I cannot really think of a high level athlete that hurt himself with rep work, but many athletes come to mind that have had serious injuries with doing 1RM. Rob Kearney blew out his triceps on a max log lift. Brian Shaw destroyed his hamstring on a heavy deadlift. Laurence Shahlaei blew out his back on a 1RM deadlift. I've seen powerlifters blow out both quads on a heavy squat. Pecs on a heavy bench. etc, etc. Your body can handle rep work at lower weights if you progress properly. However, 1RMs are designed to test the absolute limit of your body, which is when you see the nasty injuries.
There are literally thousands of athletes (and like 90 percent of the world record holders) that follow congugate and do indeed max out weekly... So there is a lot of basis to say that this is not as dangerous compared to a 3RM
 
There are literally thousands of athletes (and like 90 percent of the world record holders) that follow congugate and do indeed max out weekly... So there is a lot of basis to say that this is not as dangerous compared to a 3RM
This has been my experience. Form breaks down a bit at max effort work in any rep range, but there's a lot more breakdown when you're fighting serous fatigue from rep 12 to rep 16 than when you're just doing a 1rm. In one case you have to not screw up for about 10 seconds, in the other you have to not screw up for more than a minute.

I've only ever hurt myself in the gym doing high reps. Of course, someone who is used to doing high reps will have to practice a bit before jumping into true 1rm lifts, but that's just another reason why the conjugate method is so much more practical than traditional periodization.
 

Zagor

Woodpecker
I cannot really think of a high level athlete that hurt himself with rep work, but many athletes come to mind that have had serious injuries with doing 1RM. Rob Kearney blew out his triceps on a max log lift. Brian Shaw destroyed his hamstring on a heavy deadlift. Laurence Shahlaei blew out his back on a 1RM deadlift. I've seen powerlifters blow out both quads on a heavy squat. Pecs on a heavy bench. etc, etc. Your body can handle rep work at lower weights if you progress properly. However, 1RMs are designed to test the absolute limit of your body, which is when you see the nasty injuries.

I was looking more from a wear and tear standpoint, at the long run. If you're decently strong I would say limit fives are going to be a bigger stress on your joints, tendons and ligaments than a 1rep training max. That has been my experience anyway. As far as high level athletes are concerned, they are pushing their bodies to the absolute limits of human performance and injuries come hand in hand with that no matter what they do.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
You guys must be the lucky ones graced with shallow hip joints. I need the lift on my shoes otherwise I cannot hit depth for squats.

I used to squat like that. I had to rework my form after major back issues 2 years ago.

I started sitting back and box squatting. My toes creep to a out mid foot, but generally I try and work as Vertical a shin angle as possible.
 

PiousJ

Pigeon
Are you guys using lifting shoes like the Adipower for your squats and deadlifts? And if so, are they worth it? I heard that they can be helpful for tall guys with long femurs who have trouble hitting depth.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
Are you guys using lifting shoes like the Adipower for your squats and deadlifts? And if so, are they worth it? I heard that they can be helpful for tall guys with long femurs who have trouble hitting depth.
No. Flat souled shoes. Chucks or some variant. (I like altima urban assault boots)

If you have trouble hitting depth, I'd recommend box squats with foam mats and take out 1/4 or 1/8 inch each session till you're below parallel. Immediately following that heavy squat do some high rep work hitting depth and reinforce that form.

Some folks like the lifting shoes, but when I squared toes forward of mid shin all I ever did was aggravate my back.

For ME slightly wider stance, rooting my feet into the ground and "opening up my taint" as Ed Coan would say, helped my work on more vertical shin and better glute engagement in the squat.


Check out:

 
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FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Are you guys using lifting shoes like the Adipower for your squats and deadlifts? And if so, are they worth it? I heard that they can be helpful for tall guys with long femurs who have trouble hitting depth.
I use weightlifting shoes for the squat. Your height and length of femur doesn't really impact your depth on squat. The more accurate indicator is whether you have deep or shallow hip sockets. If you have deep hip sockets, weightlifting shoes will help with hitting depth.

For deadlifts, you don't want weightlifting shoes. Either deadlift in flat shoes, or if your gym allows it or if you workout from home, bare feet.
 

PiousJ

Pigeon
I went ahead and ordered a pair of Nike Romaleos anyhow. Got em on eBay for $80, couldn't really pass up that kind of deal lol. I hit parallel on the squat but I'd like to go a little deeper. hope these can help. As far as I can tell, I have decent ankle and hip mobility...
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
I went ahead and ordered a pair of Nike Romaleos anyhow. Got em on eBay for $80, couldn't really pass up that kind of deal lol. I hit parallel on the squat but I'd like to go a little deeper. hope these can help. As far as I can tell, I have decent ankle and hip mobility...
why do you need to go even deeper?
 

PiousJ

Pigeon
why do you need to go even deeper?
so from what I understand, ATG squats or, at the very least, below parallel are much better for muscle stimulation and your knees. I know this is controversial, but after reading a ton about it and watching some videos, I'm convinced I need to go full ROM on the squat. This isn't easy for me as I'm near 6'4 with long legs, but it can be done.
 
Are you guys using lifting shoes like the Adipower for your squats and deadlifts? And if so, are they worth it? I heard that they can be helpful for tall guys with long femurs who have trouble hitting depth.
I wore Chuck's for my first few years lifting, but eventually succumbed to peer pressure and bought the Adidas Powerlift 2.0s. They're the cheapest of the lifting shoes, or at least they were at the time.

I prefer the heels now for squats, but find them annoying for deadlifts. If at all possible try lifting in a pair before you buy.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
so from what I understand, ATG squats or, at the very least, below parallel are much better for muscle stimulation and your knees. I know this is controversial, but after reading a ton about it and watching some videos, I'm convinced I need to go full ROM on the squat. This isn't easy for me as I'm near 6'4 with long legs, but it can be done.
Be careful about the fads on the internet.

Do you have knee pain now?

Are you squating with a vertical shin angle now or with your toes forward?

I would squat to parallel depth with the crease of your hip below the top of your knee and drive on.

Its really more about you heel/ankle and foot mobility and form.

I got a lot strong and no more knee pain by squating with a more vertical shin.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
so from what I understand, ATG squats or, at the very least, below parallel are much better for muscle stimulation and your knees. I know this is controversial, but after reading a ton about it and watching some videos, I'm convinced I need to go full ROM on the squat. This isn't easy for me as I'm near 6'4 with long legs, but it can be done.
Unless you are training the high bar squat for Olympic lifts, there's no need to go ATG . If you are powerlifting or doing just general squatting, you just need to hit parallel.

If you don't have shallow hip sockets, going ATG, even with weightlifting shoes, is going to give you "butt wink", which is a good way to mess up your back.

 
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