Powerlifting

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
How would I know if I have shallow hip sockets?
Just watch the first video I posted from squat university. He provides some home tests to see whether you have deep or shallow hip sockets.

Another way to check is to see how deep you can squat before your "butt winks" and whether you can achieve depth with a narrow stance and toes pointed forward. If you are not Slavic or Asian, you properly won't have shallow hip sockets.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
You have to understand the absolute worst thing you can do is try and copy another lifer that you like. Instead, pay attention to cues and modify your form around them. For example, my conventional deadlift was one of my worst lifts, and I was constantly tweaking my back. I later learned that it was because I trying to imitate big deadlifts. It wasn't until I learned that at the bottom of your deadlift, your knees should be about aligned with your arms. Once I realized that, I saw that my hip placement was way too low, my foot placement was too wide, and my hand placement was too wide. I actually need a very high hip placement with a very narrow foot stance and grip. However, if you watch all the big deadlifts (Eddie Hall, Shaw, Pritchett, Halfthor), they have a very wide stance with a low hip placement.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Be careful about the fads on the internet.

Do you have knee pain now?

Are you squating with a vertical shin angle now or with your toes forward?

I would squat to parallel depth with the crease of your hip below the top of your knee and drive on.

Its really more about you heel/ankle and foot mobility and form.

I got a lot strong and no more knee pain by squating with a more vertical shin.
Vertical shin angle is so important because it allows you to sit back, which is why conjugate must train it with the box squat. I don't have that issue because my tibia is almost as long as my femur, so I naturally sit back on my squat.
 

get2choppaaa

Ostrich
Vertical shin angle is so important because it allows you to sit back, which is why conjugate must train it with the box squat. I don't have that issue because my tibia is almost as long as my femur, so I naturally sit back on my squat.
Exactly.

Box squat is great also because it provides static (pausing and relaxing on the box) overcome by dynamic (flexing by simulating gripping and pulling with your feet to engage glutes and hamstrings)

The idea is to keep knees at mid foot or more vertical. It really does force you to engage hips ect and not make the movement a quad focused squat
 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member
Man what happened to all the gainz threads....

A smidge off topic but.... I am finding it hard to get the recommended protein I should be getting to keep getting these gainz. I am about two months back into the gym since a hiatus during the lockdowns/scamdemic and I am already seeing results with 4 days a week in the gym doing a push/pull/basketball/push/pull routine (I know legs are coming) but I have only been getting around 100 grams of protein a day... I am 6'1 190lbs. Ideally I should be getting a lot more then 100grams of protein.

I wonder how much gainz I left on the table cause I am not getting ample protein.
 

kel

Ostrich
I worry about getting too much protein, given my preferred diet, and right now I can't go to the gym. Is protein being hard on the kidneys a real thing?

Protein powders are pretty cheap, though I prefer to get nutrition from food when possible. Still, when I was going to the gym I'd take collagen before hand and whey after (I'd buy it pure from bulksupplements.com, but before that I'd get a vanilla powder that was pretty tasty actually). Cottage cheese is a pretty good source of slow-digesting protein, and it's easy (in my experience) to eat lots.
 

get2choppaaa

Ostrich
I worry about getting too much protein, given my preferred diet, and right now I can't go to the gym. Is protein being hard on the kidneys a real thing?

Protein powders are pretty cheap, though I prefer to get nutrition from food when possible. Still, when I was going to the gym I'd take collagen before hand and whey after (I'd buy it pure from bulksupplements.com, but before that I'd get a vanilla powder that was pretty tasty actually). Cottage cheese is a pretty good source of slow-digesting protein, and it's easy (in my experience) to eat lots.
No. I wouldn't worry about the kidneys. Most kidney issues associated with high pro diets are a result of blood pressure being high due to other factors such as dehydration and diuretics used in bodybuilding.

If you're breaking down protein you need Muscle protein synthesis. 1.5 g per lb of lean body mass is a good place to start.

Handfuls of trail mix are a cheap way to add calories (which will allow you to keep a positive nitrogen balance through a caloric surplus)

For protein I go with True Nutrition . Com and buy it in bulk... I buy their whey isolate and highly branched cyclic dextrin and put a scoop to two scoops of each in a 32 oz container and drink it during my work out there's 30-60 grams carbs and 25- 50 grams protien plus 5gcreatine monohydrate.

Code "advices" will save you 5 percent.

The work out drinks aren't necessary but it does help with glycogen replenishment and muscle soreness.
 
Man what happened to all the gainz threads....

A smidge off topic but.... I am finding it hard to get the recommended protein I should be getting to keep getting these gainz. I am about two months back into the gym since a hiatus during the lockdowns/scamdemic and I am already seeing results with 4 days a week in the gym doing a push/pull/basketball/push/pull routine (I know legs are coming) but I have only been getting around 100 grams of protein a day... I am 6'1 190lbs. Ideally I should be getting a lot more then 100grams of protein.

I wonder how much gainz I left on the table cause I am not getting ample protein.
The only way to know for sure is to try eating different amounts. There is some research to suggest you only need about half a gram of protein for every pound of bodyweight to make maximum gains, but there is also a mountain of anecdotal evidence showing that everyone who has gotten strong has consumed an ungodly amount of meat.

100g of protein is only about a pound of meat, which I find pretty easy to consume at each meal as long as I do a good job preparing it. If time or money is tight, you can always supplement with protein powder.

But if you're making progress, there is probably no reason to change anything.

I worry about getting too much protein, given my preferred diet, and right now I can't go to the gym. Is protein being hard on the kidneys a real thing?
There's only one study I'm aware of that's found a link between protein intake and kidney function. And that one only found high protein diets hurt the kidney function of women over 60 who already had kidney problems.

This one compared people with unrestricted protein intake to low-protein vegetarians and didn't find a difference in kidney function over the long term: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2912408/
 

PiousJ

Pigeon
Orthodox
Cr33pin,

You probably don't need 190g of protein even. 150 should be enough, from my experience .8g per pound of body weight works best. You can get those extra 50g from like 2 scoops of a decent powder like ON.
 

Don Quixote

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Howdy fellow Meatheads.

There is a separate thread about lifting weights called "The Lifter's Lounge"... but I haven't seen anything explicitly for Powerlifting. I think this would be a good place to discuss methods/programming/ equipment/ brands/ and general discussion about the sport as well as any progress people make and the way they accomplished PR's.

I rediscovered powerlifting after getting out of the Marines and having had several injuries post service. After getting out I had done a lot of cardio and basic barbell exercises but never put any focus in powerlifting. I also had several herniated discs and back pain so bad I had a hard time bending over and tying my shoes, but would try and find a way to get through whatever workouts I could. I had a gym membership along with some Iron Master adjustable dumbbells' (up to 75 lbs), a power rack and bar and 275 lbs in bumper plates in the garage. After watching Westside vs the World and having wasted a shitload of money on chiropractor I bit the bullet and got a reverse hyper extension machine. That thing changed my life. I now have almost no back pain.

Then Covid hysteria gym closing happened and I was glad I had the rack and reverse hyper machine in my garage. Now I have a full power rack, Spud pully system, a power bar, safety squat bar (elite fts SSB Yoke bar is the best thing I have spent my money on for keeping shoulders healthy) a American Gridiron Cambered bar (great for chest and triceps specialization, also Seal Rows) a front squat harness, a sled, and assorted weights in bands/chains. Pretty much exclusively buy from Elite FTS since they dont do any BLM bullshit and their owner shares more knowledge than anyone in the business for FREE.

I am currently running the Conjugate Method, and after rehabbing my back and starting back over at an empty bar, I have gotten my deadlift back up to 495, Squats back to 475, and Bench back up to 315. (I am 5'6'' 220 lbs) This is by no means an elite total, but well ahead of a lot of the gym rats but I am pretty happy considering a year ago I was in a lot of pain and now pain free.
What is conjugate method? I just do P-P-L split. Which helps me get in sufficient volume without overtraining.
 

get2choppaaa

Ostrich
What is conjugate method? I just do P-P-L split. Which helps me get in sufficient volume without overtraining.
Conjugate combines multiple rep ranges and methods (Maximal Effort or ME, Dynamic Effort on DE, and Repetition Method) and GPP (General Physical Preparedness)

You do a ME day and a DE day for Upper and Lower (4 workout outs a week, separated by 72 hours so it might look like some permutation of:
M ME Upper
T DE UPPER
W GPP or OFF
TR DE Upper
F DE Lower
S OFF or GPP
SUN GPP or OFF


ME DAY: Basically you have a heavy main movement where you strain, a supplemental movement to reinforce week points in a similar movement pattern, then hypertrophy work in your weak areas along the movement pattern.

DE Day: Main movement you do speed repetitions of sets of 3-5 for a total of 24-25 reps focusing on generating speed, then some heavier supplemental work, then hypertrophy work again for the weak areas.

Shorter video:


Longer Video

 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
I'm half way through the first block of the Alan Thrall/Strongman training, and the first I notice is how much lean muscle I'm building. I never did dynamic effort work before, and that was a massive, idiotic mistake. Dynamic effort / speed work is 50% of becoming strong.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Bobby Thompson just hit the American log lift record.


He's one of the guys that never hits his max rep in the gym ;) . Scroll to 36:38 of this video where he discusses his training philosophy and how he avoids getting hurt.
 

get2choppaaa

Ostrich
Bobby Thompson just hit the American log lift record.


He's one of the guys that never hits his max rep in the gym ;) . Scroll to 36:38 of this video where he discusses his training philosophy and how he avoids getting hurt.
That's an impressive lift.

He's also talking about implements from what I gathered (yokes and logs) He wasn't saying that there isn't a benefit to max effort work in the gym just when it comes to sports specific efforts he doesn't do a 100 max except for in competition.

This concept is still articulated in Congugate by not taking a 1RM on the competition Bench /Squat / DL style except for in a Meet.

Big Loz also said that he doesn't recommend that concept for beginners/intermediates as you still need to learn the motor pattern. Someone who's been doing it for a long time who's very strong will know their needs.

Just like Andy Bolton when he Deadlifted over 1000 lbs.... He never did above 65-70 percent in the deadlift except for at a meet (he just works speed work and other heavy work in other movements)

Benedict Magnusson on the otherhand did heavy triples, doubles and singles and broke Bolton's record in conventional deadlift.

ETA glad he beat that Sodomite Rob Kearney
 
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For those of you doing heavy squats and deadlifts and mainly training as a strength athlete rather than a bodybuilder, I would recommend not doing barbell rows free standing, but rather in a rack underneath a bench where you lay down and row up. Sometimes they are called prone rows, other times just bench-assisted rows, but what you are doing is not overstressing your lower back muscles, and doing all the accessory lifts to the big 4 (bench, squat, deadlift, and standing overhead press) will wear on your lower back. If you want to maximize strength on your squats and deadlifts without risking pulling your back or hurting a disc (if you're doing above 405 for reps and going higher, this is you), then do these rows as your primary back accessory movement.

Here are a couple videos of examples, these are not the best but I thought I would include several to see how different guys do it.



this one here is the best representation using the squat boxes to increase the height:

 

get2choppaaa

Ostrich
For those of you doing heavy squats and deadlifts and mainly training as a strength athlete rather than a bodybuilder, I would recommend not doing barbell rows free standing, but rather in a rack underneath a bench where you lay down and row up. Sometimes they are called prone rows, other times just bench-assisted rows, but what you are doing is not overstressing your lower back muscles, and doing all the accessory lifts to the big 4 (bench, squat, deadlift, and standing overhead press) will wear on your lower back. If you want to maximize strength on your squats and deadlifts without risking pulling your back or hurting a disc (if you're doing above 405 for reps and going higher, this is you), then do these rows as your primary back accessory movement.

Here are a couple videos of examples, these are not the best but I thought I would include several to see how different guys do it.



this one here is the best representation using the squat boxes to increase the height:

Seal rows are great but I'm not sure that I totally agree with the premise. They're an isolation exercises but not a substitute for BO rows. Your advice is not inline with a lot of the high class powerlifters, many of whom perform bent over rows for multiple sets and reps (or even timed sets)

Barbell rows are also the king of back isolation development specifically because they hit the rhomboids, lats, and erectors while the glutes are in a static contraction. Their carryover to the deadlift is unparalleled.

This is why Dan Green suggests barbell rowing frequently for total back development as well as grip.


I would agree that you shouldn't only Bent over row... But it's really about programing and form/bracing.

I have had had to completely start over from not being able to tie my shoes with out grimacing to rowing in the mid 300s for sets and reps... I never have a back issues from from rowing/deadlifting/squating/Good mornings anymore.

My back pain now a days is from not focusing on back hygiene during the 90 percent of the day outside the gym.

Brian Carrol is all about back hygiene outside the gym as the most likely cause of pain (currently has the world's highest lift in a competition with a 1306 lbs squat) and completely rehabbed his back after needing surgery and plateauing in the 1180-1200 lb range.

 
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