Practical Orthodoxy

PineTreeFarmer

Sparrow
Woman
I live in a very rural place, and grew up and went through confirmation in a Methodist Church. In the 24 years since I joined a protestant religious body changes that detract from the worship experience arose. The separation of the congregation into contemporary and traditional services has separated the youth from the elder population that set the cultural tone that embodies the church. And the decision to allow homosexual marriage cheapens all of the hard won memories of engaging properly in awkward Wednesday youth choir practice and youth trips.

Within protestantism, I am having an incredibly difficult time finding a niche for my family. I married someone who went to a protestant Christian school, and had two sons. We had a very unfortunate and permanent separation over his inability to let me work, even in a traditionally female workspace like education or in a library, coupled with his very serious drinking and drug use after the larger American economic woes that loomed after our kids were born -- and inability to work, himself, due to the unavailability of work he felt was not beneath him. I found a church to help him, even with us separated and hundreds of miles apart, and he won't let them help him.

Long story short -- I live on a farm in the middle of nowhere, but I want to participate in something much more traditional, and I don't know how, if there is no such church present.

There is actually a kid I grew up with who is looking into orthodoxy, which is odd, because we are anglo middle class former suburbanites who have moved to much more rural environments in a kind of shared disenchantment with our former cul-de-sacced neighborhoods. But I can't drive my kids to church an hour and a half away every Sunday, and the Catholic churches are all in Spanish here.

How do we engage with the material in a more traditional faith in a meaningful way from where we are?
 

EntWife

Robin
Woman
I've got the same problem - but our church is 2 1/2 hours away. We tried doing it every week, and it just about killed us. We've been doing reader's services a lot at home. We've recently found out about a church 1 1/2 hours away that we're going to try.

You could probably go to church every other week or once a month, then do a reader's service on Sundays when you don't go to church. Here's a link with instructions http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/services_nopriest.aspx . That article has a link to Father John Whiteford's site, which is where my husband gets the readings for the parts of the service that change week to week. Your priest can help you with any questions you have about it.

It might be nice to meet with your friend and do reader's services together.
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Could you be more specific about which Protestant denomination? As a Protestant myself, I know that the different churches vary widely. I might be able to help direct you to a more conservative Protestant church that is closer to you.

If you are very rural (and even for those of you who are not) you can set up a “prayer corner” which is kind of like a mini-Church in your home. We use Luther’s Small Catechism for daily prayer when can’t attend our regular service.
 

Attachments

  • B8F73789-76D8-4E29-AEF2-8D728E2AB07C.jpeg
    B8F73789-76D8-4E29-AEF2-8D728E2AB07C.jpeg
    340.6 KB · Views: 3
Last edited:

Jessie

Sparrow
Woman
I live in a very rural place, and grew up and went through confirmation in a Methodist Church. In the 24 years since I joined a protestant religious body changes that detract from the worship experience arose. The separation of the congregation into contemporary and traditional services has separated the youth from the elder population that set the cultural tone that embodies the church. And the decision to allow homosexual marriage cheapens all of the hard won memories of engaging properly in awkward Wednesday youth choir practice and youth trips.

Within protestantism, I am having an incredibly difficult time finding a niche for my family. I married someone who went to a protestant Christian school, and had two sons. We had a very unfortunate and permanent separation over his inability to let me work, even in a traditionally female workspace like education or in a library, coupled with his very serious drinking and drug use after the larger American economic woes that loomed after our kids were born -- and inability to work, himself, due to the unavailability of work he felt was not beneath him. I found a church to help him, even with us separated and hundreds of miles apart, and he won't let them help him.

Long story short -- I live on a farm in the middle of nowhere, but I want to participate in something much more traditional, and I don't know how, if there is no such church present.

There is actually a kid I grew up with who is looking into orthodoxy, which is odd, because we are anglo middle class former suburbanites who have moved to much more rural environments in a kind of shared disenchantment with our former cul-de-sacced neighborhoods. But I can't drive my kids to church an hour and a half away every Sunday, and the Catholic churches are all in Spanish here.

How do we engage with the material in a more traditional faith in a meaningful way from where we are?

Yikes. I would attend no church if I had to attend one that accepted homosexuality. Have you actively looked for a better alternative? Like every single weekend, even the sad-looking churches in ramshackle buildings? We were a military family and I understand spiritual deserts, but we still always found something suitable within Protestantism. It is true that once you cross off any that have women in leadership, affirm sinful lifestyles, or preach a heath wealth gospel, there aren’t a lot left. You might have to settle for weaker preaching, but you can always supplement with excellent sermons online. The important thing is to fellowship with believers who are actively and sincerely following God, and who will help you do that as well. It is possible to drive an hour and a half to a proper church. People out here do it. It’s not ideal because your kids won’t be able to entrench themselves in church life, but it’s better than not going. Local is preferable, but not always possible. I hope you can find something, and I hope the Lord saves your husband and restores your marriage. <3
 
Top