Project Veritas thread

CynicalContrarian

Owl
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

New video about to drop :

@JamesOKeefeIII 5m
1st NYT employee we exposed employed for six months. 2nd; Six years. Now we expose someone who has been there for 20 YEARS...wait for it...
.

Edit.
Now here it is :

 

Brillynt

Pigeon
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

CynicalContrarian said:
New video about to drop :

@JamesOKeefeIII 5m
1st NYT employee we exposed employed for six months. 2nd; Six years. Now we expose someone who has been there for 20 YEARS...wait for it...
.

Edit.
Now here it is :

This guy is so screwed. As a contractor, they will just call his contracting company and have him removed. No messy firing required, just a simple phone call.
 

Number one bummer

Kingfisher
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

Brillynt said:
CynicalContrarian said:
New video about to drop :

@JamesOKeefeIII 5m
1st NYT employee we exposed employed for six months. 2nd; Six years. Now we expose someone who has been there for 20 YEARS...wait for it...
.

Edit.
Now here it is :

This guy is so screwed. As a contractor, they will just call his contracting company and have him removed. No messy firing required, just a simple phone call.
Its one thing to get some sleezy unethical journalist fired. Its another thing to get an unrelated guy fired for sharing the truth.
 

Mr. D

Pelican
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

I must admit, I'm in awe of the language used. "Audience Strategy Editor".
Must've taken minutes of mental gymnastics to come up with a bullshit title to a job that ultimately boils down to being a off-site undercover member of the Ministry Of Truth.

Here's a description:
The editor will help set strategy and manage execution of audience development across the video desk.
This person will create off-site strategies for thinking about how to tell video stories on new and old platforms.
They will specialize in the video social and influencer strategy, creating conversations off-platform, storytelling off-site,
and using analytics and other tools to provide analytical insights.
They will also be responsible for identifying emerging growth tactics and new platforms that the team should be thinking about.

Fluency across all areas is not required, but applicants should demonstrate excellence in one or more categories and comfort experimenting in all. Comfort with analytics is essential.
And:
If you are an an active employee at The New York Times or any affiliates (excluding INYT), please do not apply here. Go to the Career Worklet on your Workday home page and View "Find Internal Jobs". Thank you!
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

The Amazon Post is freaking out about this. They posted two rebuttal articles, one of which they put as the top article on their app last night, on their front page in the print edition this morning, and currently on the top center of their website. As of last night, however, both were still behind their paywall.

First one:

A woman who falsely claimed to The Washington Post that Roy Moore, the Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Alabama, impregnated her as a teenager appears to work with an organization that uses deceptive tactics to secretly record conversations in an effort to embarrass its targets.

In a series of interviews over two weeks, the woman shared a dramatic story about an alleged sexual relationship with Moore in 1992 that led to an abortion when she was 15. During the interviews, she repeatedly pressed Post reporters to give their opinions on the effects that her claims could have on Moore’s candidacy if she went public.

The Post did not publish an article based on her unsubstantiated account. When Post reporters confronted her with inconsistencies in her story and an Internet posting that raised doubts about her motivations, she insisted that she was not working with any organization that targets journalists.

But on Monday morning, Post reporters saw her walking into the New York offices of Project Veritas, an organization that targets the mainstream news media and left-leaning groups. The organization sets up undercover “stings” that involve using false cover stories and covert video recordings meant to expose what the group says is media bias.

James O’Keefe, the Project Veritas founder who was convicted of a misdemeanor in 2010 for using a fake identity to enter a federal building during a previous sting, declined to answer questions about the woman outside the organization’s offices on Monday morning shortly after the woman walked inside.

“I am not doing an interview right now, so I’m not going to say a word,” O’Keefe said.

In a follow-up interview, O’Keefe declined to answer repeated questions about whether the woman was employed at Project Veritas. He also did not respond when asked if he was working with Moore, former White House adviser and Moore supporter Stephen K. Bannon, or Republican strategists.

The group’s efforts illustrate the lengths to which activists have gone to try to discredit media outlets for reporting on allegations from multiple women that Moore pursued them when they were teenagers and he was in his early 30s. Moore has denied that he did anything improper.

A spokesman for Moore’s campaign did not respond to a message seeking comment.

The woman who approached Post reporters, Jaime T. Phillips, did not respond to calls to her cellphone later Monday. Her car remained in the Project Veritas parking lot for more than an hour.

The Post positioned videographers outside the group’s office in Mamaroneck, N.Y, after determining that Phillips lives in Stamford, Conn., and realizing that the two locations were just 16 miles apart. Two reporters followed her from her home as she drove to the office.

After Phillips was observed entering the Project Veritas office, The Post made the unusual decision to report her previous off-the-record comments.

“We always honor ‘off-the-record’ agreements when they’re entered into in good faith,” said Martin Baron, The Post’s executive editor. “But this so-called off-the-record conversation was the essence of a scheme to deceive and embarrass us. The intent by Project Veritas clearly was to publicize the conversation if we fell for the trap. Because of our customary journalistic rigor, we weren’t fooled, and we can’t honor an ‘off-the-record’ agreement that was solicited in maliciously bad faith.”

Phillips’s arrival at the Project Veritas office capped a weeks-long effort that began only hours after The Post published an article on Nov. 9 that included allegations that Moore once initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old named Leigh Corfman.

Post reporter Beth Reinhard, who co-wrote the article about Corfman, received a cryptic email early the next morning.

“Roy Moore in Alabama . . . I might know something but I need to keep myself safe. How do we do this?” the apparent tipster wrote under an account with the name “Lindsay James.”

The email’s subject line was “Roy Moore in AL.” The sender’s email address included “rolltide,” the rallying cry of the University of Alabama’s sports teams, which are nicknamed the Crimson Tide.

Reinhard sent an email asking if the person was willing to talk off the record.

“Not sure if I trust the phone,” came the reply. “Can we just stick to email?”

“I need to be confident that you can protect me before I will tell all,” the person wrote in a subsequent email. “I have stuff I’ve been hiding for a long time but maybe it should stay that way.”

The tipster’s email came amid counterattacks by Moore supporters aimed at The Post and its reporters.

That same day, Gateway Pundit, a conservative site, spread a false story from a Twitter account, @umpire43, that said, “A family friend in Alabama just told my wife that a WAPO reporter named Beth offer her 1000$ to accuse Roy Moore.” The Twitter account, which has a history of spreading misinformation, has since been deleted.

The Post, like many other news organizations, has a strict policy against paying people for information and did not do so in its coverage of Moore.

On Nov. 14, a pastor in Alabama said he received a voice mail from a man falsely claiming to be a Post reporter and seeking women “willing to make damaging remarks” about Moore for money. No one associated with The Post made any such call.

In the days that followed the purported tipster’s initial emails, Reinhard communicated with the woman through an encrypted text messaging service and spoke by phone with the person to set up a meeting. When the woman suggested a meeting in New York, Reinhard told her she would have to know more about her story and her background. The woman offered that her real name was Jaime Phillips.

Phillips said she lived in New York but would be in the Washington area during Thanksgiving week and suggested meeting Tuesday at a shopping mall in Tysons Corner, Va. “I’m planning to do some shopping there so I’ll find a good place to meet before you get there,” Phillips wrote in a message sent via Signal, the encrypted messaging service.

When Reinhard suggested bringing another reporter, Phillips wrote, “I’m not really comfortable with anyone else being there this time.”

Reinhard arrived to find Phillips, wearing a brown leather jacket and with long red hair, already seated in a booth in the restaurant.

The 41-year-old said she had been abused as a child, Reinhard said. Her family had moved often. She said she moved in with an aunt in the Talladega area of Alabama and started attending a church youth group when she met Moore in 1992, the year he became a county judge. She said she was 15. She said they started a “secret” sexual relationship.

“I knew it wasn’t right, but I didn’t care,” she said.

She said that she got pregnant, that Moore talked her into an abortion and that he drove her to Mississippi to get it.

In the interview, she told Reinhard that she was so upset she couldn’t finish her salad.

Phillips said she had started thinking about coming forward after the allegations about Hollywood film producer Harvey Weinstein surfaced. Then she said she saw the news about Moore flashing across the television screen while in a break room at her job at a company called NFM Lending in Westchester County, N.Y., Reinhard said.

Phillips also repeatedly asked the reporter to guarantee her that Moore would lose the election if she came forward. Reinhard told her in a subsequent text message that she could not predict what the impact would be. Reinhard said she also explained to Phillips that her claims would have to be fact-checked. Additionally, Reinhard asked her for documents that would corroborate or support her story.

Later that day, Phillips told Reinhard that she felt “anxiety & negative energy after our meeting,” text messages show. “You just didn’t convince me that I should come forward,” she wrote.

Reinhard replied, “I’m so sorry but I want to be straight with you about the fact-checking process and the fact that we can’t guarantee what will happen as a result of another story.”

Phillips was not satisfied. On Wednesday, the day before Thanksgiving, she suggested meeting with another Post reporter, Stephanie McCrummen, who co-wrote the initial article about Corfman. “I’d rather go to another paper than talk to you again,” Phillips told Reinhard.

Back at the newsroom, Reinhard became concerned about elements of Phillips’s story. Phillips had said she lived in Alabama only for a summer while a teenager, but the cellphone number Phillips provided had an Alabama area code. Reinhard called NFM Lending in Westchester County, but they said a person named Jaime Phillips did not work there.

Alice Crites, a Post researcher who was looking into Phillips’s background, found a document that strongly reinforced the reporters’ suspicions: a Web page for a fundraising campaign by someone with the same name. It was on the website GoFundMe.com under the name Jaime Phillips.

“I’m moving to New York!” the May 29 appeal said. “I’ve accepted a job to work in the conservative media movement to combat the lies and deceipt of the liberal MSM. I’ll be using my skills as a researcher and fact-checker to help our movement. I was laid off from my mortgage job a few months ago and came across the opportunity to change my career path.”

In a March posting on its Facebook page, Project Veritas said it was seeking 12 new “undercover reporters,” though the organization’s operatives use methods that are eschewed by mainstream journalists, such as misrepresenting themselves.

A posting for the “journalist” job on the Project Veritas website that month warned that the job “is not a role for the faint of heart.”

The job’s listed goal: “To adopt an alias persona, gain access to an identified person of interest and persuade that person to reveal information.”

It also listed tasks that the job applicant should be able to master, including: “Learning a script,” “Preparing a background story to support your role,” “Gaining an appointment or access to the target of the investigation,” and “Operating concealed recording equipment.”

Project Veritas, founded in 2010, is a tax-exempt charity that says its mission is to “investigate and expose corruption, dishonesty, self-dealing, waste, fraud and other misconduct.” It raised $4.8 million and employed 38 people in 2016, according to its public tax filing. It also had 92 volunteers.

O’Keefe’s criminal record has caused the charity problems in some states. Mississippi and Utah stripped the group of a license to raise money in those states because it failed to disclose O’Keefe’s conviction on state applications, records show.

Also working at Veritas is former television producer Robert J. Halderman, who was sentenced to six months in jail in 2010 after he was accused of trying to blackmail late-night host David Letterman. Halderman was with O’Keefe outside the Project Veritas offices Monday as a reporter tried to ask about Phillips’s role with the organization.

Because Jaime Phillips is a relatively common name, it wasn’t a certainty that the GoFundMe page that Crites found was created by the same woman who approached The Post. But there was another telling detail, in addition to the name. One of two donations listed on the page was from a person whose name matched her daughter’s, according to public records.

McCrummen agreed to meet Phillips that afternoon.

Phillips suggested meeting somewhere in Alexandria, Va., saying she was shopping in the area. Post videographers accompanied McCrummen, who brought a printout of the fundraising page to the interview.

Again, Phillips had arrived early and was waiting for McCrummen, her purse resting on the table. When McCrummen put her purse near Phillips’s purse to block a possible camera, Phillips moved hers.

The Post videographers sat separately, unnoticed, at an adjacent table.

Phillips said she didn’t want to get into the details of what she had said happened between her and Moore.

She said she wanted McCrummen to assure her that the article would result in Moore’s defeat, according to a recording. McCrummen instead asked her about her story regarding Moore.

Phillips complained that President Trump had endorsed Moore.

“So my whole thing is, like, I want him to be completely taken out of the race,” she said. “And I really expected that was going to happen, and now it’s not. So, I don’t know what you think about that.”

McCrummen asked Phillips to verify her identity with a photo identification. Phillips provided a Georgia driver’s license.

McCrummen then asked her about the GoFundMe page.

“We have a process of doing background, checking backgrounds and this kind of thing, so I wanted to ask you about one thing,” McCrummen said, pulling out a copy of the page and reading from it. “So I just wanted to ask you if you could explain this, and I also wanted to let you know, Jaime, that this is being recorded and video recorded.”

“Okay,” Phillips said. “Um, yeah, I was looking to take a job last summer in New York, but it fell through,” Phillips said. “Yeah, it was going to be with the Daily Caller, but it ended up falling through, so I wasn’t able to do it.”

When asked who at the Daily Caller interviewed her, Phillips said, “Kathy,” pausing before adding the last name, “Johnson.”

Paul Conner, executive editor of the Daily Caller, said Monday that no one with the name Kathy Johnson works for the publication and that he has no record of having personally interviewed Phillips. Conner later said in an email that he had asked other top editors at the Daily Caller and the affiliated Daily Caller News Foundation about Phillips.

“None of us has interviewed a woman by the name Jaime Phillips,” Conner wrote.

At the Alexandria restaurant on Wednesday, Phillips also told The Post that she had not been in contact with the Moore campaign. As the interview ended, Phillips told McCrummen she was not recording the conversation.

“I think I probably just want to cancel and not go through with it at this point,” Phillips said at Souvlaki Bar shortly before ending the interview.

“I’m not going to answer any more questions,” she said. “I think I’m just going to go.”

She picked up her coat and bag, returned her drink to the front counter and left the restaurant.

By 7 p.m. the message on the GoFundMe page was gone, replaced by a new one.

“Campaign is complete and no longer active,” it read.
Second article:

The Washington Post on Monday published a report about a woman who falsely claimed Roy Moore sexually assaulted her as a teenager — and who appeared to work with Project Veritas, an organization that uses deceptive tactics and secretly recorded conversations in an effort to embarrass its targets.

Shortly after the investigation was published, Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe tweeted a video of what he called his “confrontation” with one of the authors of The Post investigation, Aaron C. Davis. The video was heavily edited, a tactic for which Project Veritas has drawn criticism.

The Post filmed the entire encounter.

Davis and another Post reporter, along with two video reporters, went to the Project Veritas offices in Mamaroneck, N.Y., on Monday morning to try to determine whether the woman, Jaime T. Phillips, worked there. They watched as she walked into the office. O’Keefe, who appeared minutes later, declined to answer questions. He invited Davis back for an interview shortly after noon.

In the full version of the video, O’Keefe repeatedly declined to answer questions about the woman and her affiliation with Project Veritas. The organization has previously targeted mainstream media outlets such as CNN, which it accuses of being biased.

Upon tweeting the edited version of the video, O’Keefe said, “The Washington Post sends a reporter to question me, but take a look. Who’s interviewing who?”

Project Veritas’s edited version leaves out most of The Post’s questions about Phillips and focuses on Davis’s choice not to comment on Project Veritas’s own project — the release of a recorded conversation with Post staff writer Dan Lamothe. O’Keefe tweeted that the conversation exposes the newspaper’s “hidden agenda” and alleged bias against President Trump.

“Is The Washington Post ambushing me and confronting us because of what we’re about to release? Is this a sort of anticipatory behavior ahead of what we’re about to do?” O’Keefe asked Davis in the video.

“For several weeks you have had one of your employees, contacting our reporters, under a false name, having multiple interviews,” Davis responded. “We have been trying to test the veracity . . . of the folks coming forward, accusing Roy Moore.”

In a series of interviews with Post reporters over two weeks, Phillips shared a false story about an alleged sexual relationship in 1992 with Moore, the Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Alabama. She said the relationship led to an abortion when she was 15. During the interviews, she repeatedly pressed Post reporters to give their opinions on the whether her claims could affect Moore’s candidacy if she went public.

The Post did not publish an article based on her unsubstantiated account. When Post reporters confronted her last Wednesday with inconsistencies in her story, as well as an Internet posting that raised doubts about her motivations, she insisted that she was not working with any organization that targets journalists.
They followed them up with an editorial, masquerading as a analysis, claiming victory:

A failed effort to dupe The Washington Post into publishing a woman’s fabricated account of underage sex with Roy Moore represents the latest entry on a list of schemes that attempted to expose fake news in the mainstream media and wound up doing the opposite.

The Post’s Shawn Boburg, Aaron C. Davis and Alice Crites reported Monday that a woman who appears to have been working for Project Veritas, the conservative activist group run by James O’Keefe, approached the newspaper with a false claim that she had an abortion at age 15 after Moore impregnated her.

As Boburg, Davis and Crites wrote, “the group’s efforts illustrate the lengths far-right activists have gone to try to discredit media outlets for reporting on allegations from multiple women that Moore pursued them when they were teenagers and he was in his early 30s.”

Instead of discrediting prior reporting, however, the botched sting showcased the journalistic rigor that news outlets such as The Post exercise before publishing accusations like those against Moore, the Republican Senate candidate from Alabama.

New York magazine recently sniffed out and did not publish a false accusation of sexual misconduct involving Harvey Weinstein. In the New Yorker, journalist Ronan Farrow chronicled the experience of New York magazine reporter Ben Wallace with a woman who turned out to be an undercover operative working for a company hired by Weinstein himself:


Wallace told me that Anna first contacted him on October 28, 2016, when he had been working on the Weinstein story for about a month and a half. Anna declined to disclose who had given her Wallace’s information. Over the course of the two meetings, Wallace grew increasingly suspicious of her motives. Anna seemed to be pushing him for information, he recalled, “about the status and scope of my inquiry, and about who I might be talking to, without giving me any meaningful help or information.” During their second meeting, Anna requested that they sit close together, leading Wallace to suspect that she might be recording the exchange. When she recounted her experiences with Weinstein, Wallace said, “it seemed like soap-opera acting.”

The woman who tried to fool The Post, Jaime Phillips, raised suspicions in similar ways. At times, she seemed to be trying to bait reporters into saying that publishing allegations against Moore would end his campaign. During one meeting, she positioned — and repositioned — her purse in a way that suggested the presence of a hidden camera.

In July, MSNBC host Rachel Maddow told viewers (and fellow journalists) that “somebody for some reason appears to be shopping a fairly convincing fake NSA document that purports to directly implicate somebody from the Trump campaign in working with the Russians on their attack on the election. It is a forgery.”

Maddow said she and her staff determined that the document is fake before reporting on it. She explained her theory about why someone tried to induce her into airing a bogus scoop:


One way to stab in the heart aggressive American reporting on that subject is to lay traps for American journalists who are reporting on it, trick news organizations into reporting what appears to be evidence of what happened, and then after the fact blow that reporting up.

You then hurt the credibility of that news organization. You also cast a shadow over any similar reporting in the future, whether or not it’s true, right? Even if it’s true, you plant a permanent question, a permanent asterisk, a permanent “who knows?” as to whether that too might be false, like that other story — whether that too might be based on fake evidence.

In May, conservative talk show host Bill Mitchell suggested that supporters of President Trump could discredit news outlets such as The Post and New York Times by tricking them into publishing “crazy ‘leaks.’ ”

Times reporter Maggie Haberman replied: “The Trump administration has tried this a few times, sir. We actually vet these things.”

On Monday, vetting once again prevented a false claim from being published. A Project Veritas plot designed to embarrass the media by exposing recklessness demonstrated the media’s care instead.
 

Handsome Creepy Eel

Owl
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

While it's nice to see the degenerate Washington Post propagandists upset, we must keep in mind that they are so incompetent and hateful that even the most basic, reasonably convincing background could have easily fooled them to the end. But sadly, Project Veritas did a shoddy job on this one. They are not sending their best.

What could have been a massive slam dunk is a lukewarm draw thanks to the attention whoring of a woman who thinks that moving to New York is somehow deserving of a GoFundMe campaign.
 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

So it looks like Twitter hired a bunch of American hating Indians to censor us.

The one IRT says he searches for words like “America” to shadow ban “red necks”. The the phrase “red neck” is white people’s “nigger”.

We are giving our country away to these turd worlders. This is outrages.

We need to end H1B1 and kick these invaders out.
 

kaotic

Owl
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

This is just Twitter - now imagine this times a 100.

That's how many of these people you have working in Soylicon Valley and the tech sector.

We helped the tech sector grow, it's turned on us for some time now - now they're censoring all of us.


$10 says the IRT's the girls were talking to were "help me find hot white girl"

 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

Okeefe’s sources and methods haven’t been revealed, but it looks like he used a honey pot to extract info from thirsty San Francisco IT geeks.

In the one video, the Twatter dude is a white beta soy boy and there’s an attractive girl sitting next to him and touching him and coaxing out Twitter secrets. Okeefe is sitting across the table in disguise. She prolly matched with him online (maybe through LinkedIn?) and had “date” one alone, then date two with her “brother” ( okeefe in disguise).

Fish in a barrel .
 

JohnKreese

Pelican
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

kaotic said:
This is just Twitter - now imagine this times a 100.

That's how many of these people you have working in Soylicon Valley and the tech sector.

We helped the tech sector grow, it's turned on us for some time now - now they're censoring all of us.


$10 says the IRT's the girls were talking to were "help me find hot white girl"
Probably the main reason why Twitter hasn't banned Roosh. These guys need his stuff!
 

CynicalContrarian

Owl
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

Dusty said:
Okeefe’s sources and methods haven’t been revealed, but it looks like he used a honey pot to extract info from thirsty San Francisco IT geeks.

In the one video, the Twatter dude is a white beta soy boy and there’s an attractive girl sitting next to him and touching him and coaxing out Twitter secrets. Okeefe is sitting across the table in disguise. She prolly matched with him online (maybe through LinkedIn?) and had “date” one alone, then date two with her “brother” ( okeefe in disguise).

Fish in a barrel .
Amusing isn't it?
These fuckers will rant about foreign policy this & defence policy that.

Yet they have no clue about simple OPSEC...
 
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

If you wrote a book about how Indians can get white girls it'd probably sell millions of copies. Like half the world's IT workers would be buying copies.
 

CynicalContrarian

Owl
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

Would be great to be a fly on the wall at Twitter HQ.

The REEEsteria that must be in play...
 

kaotic

Owl
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

Disco_Volante said:
If you wrote a book about how Indians can get white girls it'd probably sell millions of copies. Like half the world's IT workers would be buying copies.
Honestly with the amount of white and mexican girls I've banged - I could probably write one.

But one of these H1B IRT fags would just rip it off just like how they document jobs companies outsource to them.
 

budoslavic

Peacock
Gold Member
RE: Project Veritas: Undercover work inside the Regressive left

PV released another video today, "Hundreds of Twitter Employees Paid to View "Everything You Post," & Private "Sex Messages".
...Twitter Engineers and employees admitting that Twitter employees view "everything you post" on their servers, including private "sex messages," and "d*ck pics." The engineers also admit that Twitter analyzes this information to create a "virtual profile" of you which they sell to advertisers.
 
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