Quiet Quitting / Decline in Worker Productivity

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
The number of young men, especially in today's environment, who will choose #1 would greatly outnumber #2. It isn't that they are lazy, it is there is no real incentive to work harder for a "better life" because the hard work doesn't make your life that much better and it might make it worse. I know of guys in the service industry who have degrees in accounting and finance and they couldn't stand to sit in a boring office all day long and found they could make close to as much bartending or serving and have a lot more fun. Sure there is no future growth, but what future does this country provide these days as it is?
I agree.

Historically people could accept being boring corporate/office slaves because there were long term rewards and upward trajectory.

But that's largely gone for most. It's a numbers game and there are simply very few opportunities to move upward compared to decades ago.

If you don't receive increased financial stability and compounding earning potential, then most will opt for something else.

There's still opportunity in a handful of sectors like finance/banking but it's few and far between overall. Companies now employ based on cutting costs, gender equality, social justice, diversity, etc. You can be an outstanding, top performer and be bypassed by Shaniqua because pink haired HR exec says so.
 
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It_is_my_time

Crow
Protestant
I agree.

Historically people could accept being boring corporate/office slaves because there were long term rewards and upward trajectory.

But that's largely gone for most. It's a numbers game and there are simply very few opportunities to move upward compared to decades ago.

If you don't receive increased financial stability and compounding earning potential, then most will opt for something else.

There's still opportunity in a handful of sectors like finance/banking but it's few and far between overall. Companies now employ based on cutting costs, gender equality, social justice, diversity, etc. You can be an outstanding, top performer and be bypassed by Shaniqua because pink haired HR exec says so.
Yep, and due to a few things, a lot of thinking it over, even comments on this forum I have thought about things a lot recently. Right now I am working from home. I will never go into an office 5 days a week again. I'm not saying my employer will not mandate it someday, I just will not do it. The only reason I am able to keep working my full time job is because I am at home. If I was going into the office the burnout would be too harsh.

I have some other irons in the fire and if they pan out, great. If not, I just don't have children but at least I am not miserable sitting in the office. I guess the scales told me that sitting in an office 5 days a week for the next 25 years would be more painful than not having children.
 

TheosisSeeker

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
Also much of the situation depends on your boss. While most bosses in large corporations are leftist idealogues, some just do the minimum to tow the DIEversity agenda and will tell you 'offline' that they believe it's a load of you know what.

While it's hard to know that right away, we all have good instincts, so use them while interviewing. Also, you can sometimes generalize from a person's ethic background. I've even cyber sleuthed potential managers FB pages and saw if they liked leftist pages or posted anti-Trump content. If so, a no go for me.

Lastly, if you ever do find yourself under a DIEversity manager some are definitely worse than others. I had one direct diversity manager once, a butch lesbian. She loved my work ethic though, was straightforward and gave me two raises, but your mileage may vary.

The larger issue in my opinion is the lack of upward mobility. You have to work twice as hard and be twice as creative to move up than a DIEversity candidate if you're a white male, especially if you aren't towing the globo agenda on a daily basis.
 

Blade Runner

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I've had decent luck in conversations with European women. I think largely because I take such a huge interest in their history and culture and can talk about it in more detail, and I live much more like men other there live as far as dress, mannerisms and interests.
Yeah, not trying to hijack the thread but as I've stated before, it is relevant because without good companies and leadership you will not get greater productivity. And this productivity is mostly via incentives to men, who actually will and want to work as a matter of their nature - if they deem it worthy or there is a goal that can be accomplished.

This leads to something we haven't really brought up here but is intrinsic to my point: FIRE is a type of quitting. Or at least understanding that a silly, abusive boss shouldn't run your life, or that you could be in other locations where women are actually pleasant and you can geo-arbitrage the USD. What keeps European women more reasonable, in a sense, is that they are thinner and poorer and thus have to live with their parents/family and walk to most places, which creates greater family unity and community unity, and exercise. They have a knowledge of their own history where our culture is all about destroying a national unity and its importance. Northern euros (more socialist and weirdly non assimilated immigrants) won't have this like mediterraneans or central/eastern europeans, but there is still a better chance. Like @Cynllo says though, and I think he may be from Europe, most caucasian women there will pay lip service to family and marriage, but still wanna wait towards 28-30 minimum to really consider marriage. As we've said, there's always this push to pay full price for used goods.
 

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
Yep, and due to a few things, a lot of thinking it over, even comments on this forum I have thought about things a lot recently. Right now I am working from home. I will never go into an office 5 days a week again. I'm not saying my employer will not mandate it someday, I just will not do it. The only reason I am able to keep working my full time job is because I am at home. If I was going into the office the burnout would be too harsh.
This country isn't the Andy Griffith or I love Lucy shows our parents grew up with. I still remember the reruns on tv in the 90's.

That America likely is never coming back. Certainly not in our life times. The opportunity of that era is long gone. As is the ability of many to achieve even the modest lifestyle those shows represented.

It all ties together. You're in a good situation working from home. Half a century ago you'd be putting on a suit and tie everyday and grabbing your briefcase as you went out the door to report to work. Different times. Different loyalties. Different opportunities.

Didn't most large employers threaten to or did fire employees with years of tenure over the COVID vax. Didn't that happen across industries, from tech to legal to manufacturing to healthcare to education. Don't most large monopolies grind lower level employees as hard as they can while their C-level execs clean up with huge bonuses, only to promote the non-binary queer for some unspoken HR quotas. Aren't most small businesses barely hanging on and while you can earn a paycheck employed for them, it's not really any kind of a stable career where you'll be that much further ahead in 10 years. Isn't diversity training and anti-white dynamics common place and getting worse. And won't companies continue to lean towards automation and hiring of immigrants which will simply shrink the pool of opportunity year on year.

Sure some people can still get good jobs/careers. But the dynamics of the market place is changing rapidly. I'll be teaching my children how to build a remote business without the need to be dependent on an employer. Because I think there's a good chance 20 years from now 75% of the population in the US will be low wage, paycheck to paycheck earners on government housing in crime ridden neighborhoods. Complete slaves to the system unless you can build something independently. Middle class gone.
 

GigaBITE

Woodpecker
Oriental Orthodox
This country isn't the Andy Griffith or I love Lucy shows our parents grew up with. I still remember the reruns on tv in the 90's.

That America likely is never coming back. Certainly not in our life times. The opportunity of that era is long gone. As is the ability of many to achieve even the modest lifestyle those shows represented.
What's strange is that as someone growing up in the 1990s I was actually okay to be living in 1990s America vs. 1950s America. The U.S. had "won" the Cold War, the culture was still mindful of the white majority, you could look at a television screen and not have to witness Woke nonsense (for the most part), someone like Biden was trying to take "the predators off the streets."

But so much of it was a facade. Overconfidence in global hegemonic power meant that there was an extreme insularity: politics was domestic, revolving around issues like violence in video games, assisted suicide, immigration, abortion, race riots, Clinton not having sexual relations with that woman, Columbine, etc. This unfortunately allowed the neocons to run riot in Washington (destroying Yugoslavia, destroying the Middle East, destroying Russia until, symbolically, Vladimir Putin assumed the presidency on December 31, 1999...).
 

Blade Runner

Hummingbird
Orthodox
What's strange is that as someone growing up in the 1990s I was actually okay to be living in 1990s America vs. 1950s America. The U.S. had "won" the Cold War, the culture was still mindful of the white majority, you could look at a television screen and not have to witness Woke nonsense (for the most part), someone like Biden was trying to take "the predators off the streets."

But so much of it was a facade. Overconfidence in global hegemonic power meant that there was an extreme insularity: politics was domestic, revolving around issues like violence in video games, assisted suicide, immigration, abortion, race riots, Clinton not having sexual relations with that woman, Columbine, etc. This unfortunately allowed the neocons to run riot in Washington (destroying Yugoslavia, destroying the Middle East, destroying Russia until, symbolically, Vladimir Putin assumed the presidency on December 31, 1999...).
Yes, we were experiencing normal life, but normal life that had peaked in terms of materialism and modernity. It was about to start the descent into the institutionally deranged and central planned life that technology and media, in league with the government and the ability to manage the monetary system and world reserve currency, would control. Remember how credentialism was getting huge (rankings, etc) in high school to go to college XYZ? It was the beginning of the end. A lot of my "friends" from back then, those normal times, ended up being indifferent leftists and world travelers. Few had kids with what the plan was also for the young women of the time.

If you were a traditional person in America you really had to buck the trend and get connections with similar people, get lucky with university or grad or early work job connections; otherwise you'd only really be at the late stage peak status male in his 30s later in life where no one can or wants to connect you. Again, the rational decision then becomes: pay less taxes, don't feed the system, or try to disentangle yourself from the system and get to places where you can meet young women who actually need you.
 

homersheineken

Pelican
Protestant

TikTok videos on 'Quiet Quitting'--doing the minimum at work, giving nothing extra to the employer-- have gone viral, and The Wall Street Journal quickly picked up the thread:

If Your Co-Workers Are 'Quiet Quitting,' Here's What That Means Some Gen Z professionals are saying no to hustle culture; 'I'm not going to go extra.'

The movement away from putting career first and sacrificing to get ahead financially is global: From the Great Resignation to Lying Flat, Workers Are Opting Out In China, the U.S., Japan, and Germany, younger generations are rethinking the pursuit of wealth.

Here are a few excerpts from the WSJ article:

"It isn't about getting off the company payroll, these employees say. In fact, the idea is to stay on it-- but focus your time on the things you do outside of the office.
Paige West, 24, said she stopped overextending herself at a former position as a transportation analyst in Washington, D.C., less than a year into the job. Work stress had gotten so intense that, she said, her hair was falling out and she couldn't sleep. While looking for a new role, she no longer worked beyond 40 hours each week, didn't sign up for extra training and stopped trying to socialize with colleagues.
Mr. Khan explained the concept this way: "You're quitting the idea of going above and beyond."
"You're no longer subscribing to the hustle-culture mentality that work has to be your life," he said.
Mr. Khan says he and many of his peers reject the idea that productivity trumps all; they don't see the payoff.
"One factor Gallup uses to measure engagement is whether people feel their work has purpose. Younger employees report that they don't feel that way, the data show."
Josh Bittinger, a 32-year-old market-research director at a management-consulting company, said people who stumble on the phrase "quiet quitting" may assume it encourages people to be lazy, when it actually reminds them to not work to the point of burnout."
There's a lot to unpack here.

1. The nature of work has changed due to the dominance of capital and globalization.


The pressure to increase productivity has been increasing for decades even as everyday life has become more demanding. Even a 40-hour a week job can cause burnout when the workplace is a toxic pressure cooker.

Globalization has a role in this, as the Neoliberal "solution" is to make everything into a market. In terms of work, the net result is everyone is competing with the rest of the world for work in "tradeable" sectors.

This Neoliberal iteration of capitalism favors capital over labor on many levels. Capital is mobile and can enter and exit global markets in seconds. Labor does not have the same mobility.

Capital can find cheaper sources of labor somewhere on the planet, and can move and shutter factories, call centers, etc. at will to boost profits.

The net result is that labor has lost political and pricing power. Workers were basically told to accept lower compensation and security to keep their jobs.

A more pernicious expression of this dominance of capital over labor is the increasing demands for effort that isn't compensated. This has many manifestations: the expectation that "everyone" will work overtime for free, take work home, be on call all weekend, etc.

Here's an example: when chatting with a flight attendant a few years ago on a domestic flight, the attendant told me that their hourly pay stops when the aircraft's wheels touch the runway. This isn't the end of their work, of course, but it was the end of their pay.

Readers have sent me videos of clueless U.S.-based Big Tech interns who do no real work but who jet around to useless meetings, gorge on free food at lavish corporate canteens, etc., but the reality for most of the workforce is work is demanding.

Managers who once had secretaries (the "Mad Men" era) now are expected to do their own correspondence, etc.

Even being on call for random shifts reflects the powerlessness of labor and the dominance of capital, a dominance driven by the open-ended competition of Globalization and the enormous advantages offered to corporations and the already-wealthy by Financialization, which lowered the cost of capital to the financial elite while maintaining high rates of interest for the workforce.

All the "above and beyond" is essentially unpaid labor, a reflection of capital's dominance of labor, whose share of the national income and political power declined for 45 years.



This long decline has finally reversed, as labor scarcities are changing the power relations of labor and capital.

2. Labor scarcities are permanent due to demographic and social dynamics.

One rarely examined trend is the remarkable rise of disability as an alternative to work.

This is a topic fraught with emotion, but the data shows that millions of workers are living on disability entitlements with disabilities that would not have qualified as permanent disabilities in previous generations.

The pandemic lockdown forced households to re-examine their budgets and expectations, and some percentage discovered they could get by on one income if they slashed discretionary spending.

These households discovered that having a job was now optional, enabling the second spouse to be pickier about what sort of work they would take.

Socially, the erosion of labor's share of the economy has sparked a systemic reversal as Corporate America is now facing unionizing campaigns after decades of unquestioned power over employees.



The generational expectations of work are also changing, a reality reflected in "lying flat" and "quiet quitting." Younger generations are re-assessing the sacrifices that must be made to claw one's way into the upper-middle class and concluding the meager benefits (a huge mortgage, high-pressure work. no life beyond work, etc.) aren't worth the sacrifice of one's life.

Demographically, the 65+ million Baby Boom generation has continued working far longer than previous generations, but as Boomers leave the workforce, the replacement workforce isn't of the same size or zeitgeist.

"Lying flat" and "quiet quitting" are further reducing the labor force of those willing to sacrifice themselves for employers seeking higher profits.

3. "Lying flat, quiet quitting" and labor scarcities are second order consequences of crushing systemic inequality.


If you detect a Marxist critique here, you're correct. "Lying flat" and "quiet quitting" fit perfectly into a classic Marxist framework of capital's dominance having second-order effects.

(First order effects: every action has a consequence. Second order effects: every consequence has its own consequence.)

Financialization gave capital unlimited access to low-cost credit and access to newly opened global markets for labor, goods, services, assets and risk.

This "nearly free money" and unfettered access to markets starved of credit and teeming with people with few options for cash work was the ideal set-up for capital to exploit cheap labor (at the expense of developed-world labor) and scoop up undervalued assets which could be financialized and sold for quick gains.

One first order effect of globalized Financialization is the rise of credit / asset bubbles, as low-cost capital competed for assets that offered yields or potential capital gains.

The second-order effect of Financialization is the cost of raising a family and owning a home soared out of reach for many workers.

In the most desirable cities, only the highest-paid workers can afford a house. Those with average jobs and pay have been priced out.

As the purchasing power of wages deflated, assets inflated. This is a global phenomenon. A Chinese worker making $10,000 a year has no hope of buying a $500,000 flat in a first or second-tier city. The average worker in Copenhagen or Tokyo is also priced out.

I've often showed charts which show the vast majority of all income and wealth gains in the era of hyper-Globalization and hyper-Financialization (roughly 1985 to the present) have flowed to the top.



Those relatively few workers with scarce skills benefited from capital's need for specialized skills while the wages of the bottom 95% lost purchasing power.

Those with access to cheap capital reaped the vast majority of the gains from asset bubbles. This reality is documented in these links:

Lying flat and quiet quitting are second order consequences of crushing systemic inequality. There is no reason to sacrifice one's life for employers' profits when the supposed rewards are so far out of reach.

Japan offers an interesting case study of second-order effects of systemic inequality and a stagnant economy.

There is a thick overlay of face-saving propaganda about Japan, but beneath this heavily promoted gloss the social consequences are striking: arubaito and Hikkormori.

Arubaito is part-time, impermanent work, from the German word for work, arbeit. Those who don't get into elite universities or who have given up aspiring to get into elite universities work low-level, low-pay jobs, often part-time. They spend their time pursuing hobbies and amusement, as they don't make enough to get married, have kids and buy a house, and never will.

(Those with an interest in Japan's unpublicized elite would do well to study the character of Kaburagi in the Japanese TV series Aibou - Partners in English.)

Hikkikomori
, literally translated as "pulling inward, being confined," is the total withdrawal from society, also known as acute social withdrawal.

These individuals withdraw into their room at home and rarely leave. Japan now has a serious social problem: what to do with these people once their aging parents die and there's no one left to take care of them.

This may seem extreme but within the context of Japanese culture, this is a manifestation of giving up as a result of being unable to withstand the unrelenting pressures of high work and social expectations.

In my terminology, both arubaito and hikkikomori are manifestations of social defeat: there is no way for average people to achieve the dream of middle-class security and family and meet the absurdly demanding expectations for the "perfect" marriage, family, career, etc.

What are the second-order consequences of the global abandonment of the struggle to attain middle-class status and wealth?

Here are a few:


1. There won't be a younger generation with the means or interest in buying all the global Baby Boomers' overvalued assets.

2. Those inheriting their Boomer parents' assets which they assume they can sell at today's bloated prices will be shocked at the decline of the valuation once the massive supply overhang hits the market.

3. Younger generations with little interest in trying to make a lot of money to sock away for a distant retirement will not be funneling earnings into stocks, bonds, real estate investment trusts, etc.

The demand for financial assets will decline, and sellers will find a dearth of buyers. As demand for the vast oversupply of financial assets falls, so will price.

4. As labor demands an equalization of income and power, corporations will be hard-pressed to extract more profits from labor. Profits will be pressured for many reasons, including labor costs.

5. Consumption may hold up better than expected as younger workers spend their earnings on experiences and enjoying life rather than socking away money or devoting it to paying mortgages and property taxes.

6. The sacrifices required to live in high-rent cities--the equivalent of a mortgage--will push younger workers out of high-priced cities, eventually reducing demand and rents.

If cities decay per my forecast, this migration could gather momentum much faster than the mainstream expects.

This doesn't exhaust the second-order effects of the destabilizing inequality generated by hyper-Globalization and hyper-Financialization, and the unraveling of these two forces will generate additional consequences few conventional analysts and pundits anticipate.
 

Grigori

 
Banned
Other Christian
2. Labor scarcities are permanent due to demographic and social dynamics.

One rarely examined trend is the remarkable rise of disability as an alternative to work.

This is a topic fraught with emotion, but the data shows that millions of workers are living on disability entitlements with disabilities that would not have qualified as permanent disabilities in previous generations.
Would you consider the possibility that at least a plurality of workers are living on disability entitlements, because they have been physically damaged by the vaxx? It is known that many workers in the western world had to take the vaxx or lose their jobs, which could have led to many disabilities, causing these people to retreat from the workforce. Restraunts and stores in the US have already cut their hours by third. So we have millions of workers living on disability entitlements.

What would be the ramifications of millions of workers dropping out of the productive economy, not just reducing the amount of effort that they show at work, but I mean being laid off or placed on disability entitlements? What about if these workers are in essential fields, not just paper pushers, but I mean construction, welding, shipping (truck drivers or amazon deliverers), engineers, doctors, manufacturing, pilots, computer programmers? What happens when the number of available workers in such fields, at least in western countries, drops by fourth, or by third, or even by half?
 

Blade Runner

Hummingbird
Orthodox
Would you consider the possibility that at least a plurality of workers are living on disability entitlements, because they have been physically damaged by the vaxx? It is known that many workers in the western world had to take the vaxx or lose their jobs, which could have led to many disabilities, causing these people to retreat from the workforce. Restraunts and stores in the US have already cut their hours by third. So we have millions of workers living on disability entitlements.

What would be the ramifications of millions of workers dropping out of the productive economy, not just reducing the amount of effort that they show at work, but I mean being laid off or placed on disability entitlements? What about if these workers are in essential fields, not just paper pushers, but I mean construction, welding, shipping (truck drivers or amazon deliverers), engineers, doctors, manufacturing, pilots, computer programmers? What happens when the number of available workers in such fields, at least in western countries, drops by fourth, or by third, or even by half?
Faster decline in the kicking the can down the road game, standard of living, and marked increase or sustenance of inflation.

A lot of people forget that the paradox of inflation that is already out of the bag is that the near term effects of demand destruction and going towards survival mode also make the economy less productive, which means less production and supply of goods, which maintains inflation. Short story? Economic collapse when debt levels are this high, and no will to make instant free enterprise economy, which is the only fix. You'd need to incent business owners to easily create business and get greater profits for the same work, or really good profits for a lot less work. That won't happen unless drastic economic policy and tax changes occur when labor is in such demand = it won't happen.
 

ultralight_hiker

Sparrow
Protestant
This is common in my job. I remediate sewage and mold in homes, as well as clean water loss and fire damage. Tons of on-call work, 1 hour+ commute one way to jobs, use our own vehicle, etc. Up until recently, we weren't even paid time and a half for weekends or afterhours. And they didn't allow us to be on the clock while driving from one job to another. People got fed up with it, and things really start to go downhill. Nobody feels like they are valued. Then the lowest producers get even more lazy, causing more work to fall on the more productive workers. Eventually, we sort of feel like it doesn't matter and we all have a worse attitude about it. No one is willing to volunteer for shifts to clean up sewage in a crawlspace if no one else seems to care.
 

St Bernard

Pigeon
Catholic
This is a great thread.

I'm a business consulting and management path tech employee working for a large-cap publicly traded company.

I have been WFH since Covid-19, and I am a quiet quitting millennial.

I started my career as a workaholic, thinking that I would be edified and get personal and social esteem through my work which did not turn out to be the case.

After 3 changes in managers in 3 years, my female boss told me that many people just "don't take their jobs as seriously as I did anymore", basically asking me to stop taking initiative.

Since then, I do the bare minimum, probably 4 hours of work a week, and get paid the same salary. I am receiving bonuses and raises at the same cadence that I was when I was working +10 hours per week and I am considered a "high performer".

I can agree with the posters who mentioned that the current corporate environment does not promote merit based performance. The job has conditioned me to keep my head down, do the bare minimum, be as amicable with management as possible, and to pursue opportunities with other companies versus seeking opportunities within my own company as taking a new job can net an instant 10% raise versus working in the same company and being bounded by salary grades and role profiles.

Even though I am pursuing credentials and additional education to raise my salary, I consider my real job value-stock analysis and investing which has had a better return on investment for my time. I am keenly aware that the best opportunities for myself are through self-employment and not through any corporate path.
 

BasilSeal

Kingfisher
Trad Catholic
Gold Member
At the risk of being a virtue signaling broken record... you are really working 10% of the hours expected of a full time salaried employee? I would resign. What price are you really paying to collect that salary?

Screenshot_20221010_075113.jpg
 

St Bernard

Pigeon
Catholic
At the risk of being a virtue signaling broken record... you are really working 10% of the hours expected of a full time salaried employee? I would resign. What price are you really paying to collect that salary?

View attachment 49225

Very valid comment. I have pondered this as I know it is a grave sin, but I am a salaried not an hourly employee. I am fulfilling the yearly goals ahead of schedule and my boss is happy with my work; the job itself is just not fulfilling my fullest potential. I am actively seeking new employment, but I am not able to resign from this job because of rent and bills.
 

Australia Sucks

 
Banned
Other Christian
Very valid comment. I have pondered this as I know it is a grave sin, but I am a salaried not an hourly employee. I am fulfilling the yearly goals ahead of schedule and my boss is happy with my work; the job itself is just not fulfilling my fullest potential. I am actively seeking new employment, but I am not able to resign from this job because of rent and bills.
It sounds amazing to receive a full time salary for only 4 hours of work per week!! Why would you ever leave that job?
 

St Bernard

Pigeon
Catholic
It sounds amazing to receive a full time salary for only 4 hours of work per week!! Why would you ever leave that job?

I feel myself becoming lazy and I know it's not fulfilling my masculine purpose and potential. I also want to be in an office again to experience people face-to-face.

I know it seems bizarre to fulfill the pipeline of work so quickly, but the job is baselined on the throughput of middle IQ working mothers and corporate America truly is this dysfunctional with very low expectations. I attempt to propose ways to broaden the pipeline and to find new opportunities and ways to expand the business, but middle management has accustomed itself to a gentle working pace post-Covid 19 and is not receptive to it.
 

Australia Sucks

 
Banned
Other Christian
I feel myself becoming lazy and I know it's not fulfilling my masculine purpose and potential. I also want to be in an office again to experience people face-to-face.

I know it seems bizarre to fulfill the pipeline of work so quickly, but the job is baselined on the throughput of middle IQ working mothers and corporate America truly is this dysfunctional with very low expectations. I attempt to propose ways to broaden the pipeline and to find new opportunities and ways to expand the business, but middle management has accustomed itself to a gentle working pace post-Covid 19 and is not receptive to it.
You are basically semi retired use the time to read more, work out more, learn new skills etc. just keep on the gravy train. And if you want to work harder just get another similar job where you can also work only 4 hours a week and collect two full time salaries!!

Besides the higher ups in your company are probably mostly crooked and lazy anyway (like in every large corporation) so why should you feel guilty?
 

St Bernard

Pigeon
Catholic
You are basically semi retired use the time to read more, work out more, learn new skills etc. just keep on the gravy train. And if you want to work harder just get another similar job where you can also work only 4 hours a week and collect two full time salaries!!

Besides the higher ups in your company are probably mostly crooked and lazy anyway (like in every large corporation) so why should you feel guilty?

It has been pretty cushy while it lasted, but I have the parable of the talents in mind:


If I'm not using the fullness of my gifts to build abundance to lift up others, I am acting against God's will and I do take BasilSeal's post seriously.
 
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