Real estate thread

cosine

Robin
See above. Colorado is so far gone at this point its insane. Denver is like New Sodom. The Rockies are so cool but they are bought up, fenced off, or filled with lib trash these days. That why I am trying to relocate.
I always figured, "a gun is just not necessary for me, it's more likely to wind up in some domestic dispute or something". Spending a few months living in a busy part of Denver during the George Floyd riots changed that real quick and now I am armed.

Now I'm in the roaring fork; yep it's expensive, but places like Grand Junction and especially New Castle are surprisingly nice, not too many meth-heads despite the reputation. In Boulder/Denver, rich people's houses are littered with BLM yard signs. At least in Aspen, it's mostly American flags, and there are zero homeless people.

Of course, now that I'm in a relaxed place, the emotional need for a firearm has really subsided.

Anchorage and Fairbanks both seemed reasonable when I visited in 2013-2015, but I have heard that in the past couple of years, Anchorage in particular has gone steeply downhill.
 

Sword

Sparrow
Now I'm in the roaring fork; yep it's expensive, but places like Grand Junction and especially New Castle are surprisingly nice, not too many meth-heads despite the reputation. In Boulder/Denver, rich people's houses are littered with BLM yard signs. At least in Aspen, it's mostly American flags, and there are zero homeless people.
Is there much land around there? Its a really nice area, but colorado is getting around 20k an acre (or more) and any house is 400k. One of the other reasons, is colorado is getting too dry. As a kid it was so wet everywhere. Now its desert in most of the state. Areas like pagosa (near you) has some pretty spots, but holy cow a lot of people live there now. Cant even drive through the town.
 

cosine

Robin
Is there much land around there? Its a really nice area, but colorado is getting around 20k an acre (or more) and any house is 400k. One of the other reasons, is colorado is getting too dry. As a kid it was so wet everywhere. Now its desert in most of the state. Areas like pagosa (near you) has some pretty spots, but holy cow a lot of people live there now. Cant even drive through the town.
The desert climate makes me think Idaho might be better. That place is blowing up too, but just isn't as bad as huge blue cities.

I grew up in silicon valley. Hearing people complain about Denver prices still feels a bit odd.

Edit: oh yes, land is incredibly expensive even on the outskirts of RFV. The Aspen effect has made prices truly skyrocket over the past 12 months in Glenwood Springs especially. My strategy is entirely around buying places that can be rented quickly. I put low money down, get the tenants to pay and break-even, then hopefully make a killing off the appreciation/inflation. I'm happy to get in before BlackRock and friends really take over. I have remote work that's technically based in the front range -- so many other people are doing the same thing, escaping metros for nice places. I think that trend will continue and this'll be a great investment.
 
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Sword

Sparrow
So you are playing the rent jew game? While it makes sense for an individual, this is one of the major problems with our ecnomy. Rich/elites/investment companies buy up everything on credit, flip to rentals and repeat. Of the two streets I have lived on in 3 years, I saw over 10 houses switch from single family homes to rentals. Of course the people there pay the same price, but now there are even less homes for others. Its a huge speculative thing, and its propped up by a lot of corrupt things. It is a huge problem.

We are on the road to 2 class system, and this is one of the absolute core paths it is done through.
 

nordle

Pigeon
So you are playing the rent jew game? While it makes sense for an individual, this is one of the major problems with our ecnomy. Rich/elites/investment companies buy up everything on credit, flip to rentals and repeat. Of the two streets I have lived on in 3 years, I saw over 10 houses switch from single family homes to rentals. Of course the people there pay the same price, but now there are even less homes for others. Its a huge speculative thing, and its propped up by a lot of corrupt things. It is a huge problem.

We are on the road to 2 class system, and this is one of the absolute core paths it is done through.
Refuse to play their game if you like. I choose to play the game for my family.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
After a couple summer months of higher inventory where things seemed to be stabilizing, things have regressed in the DC exurbs. Inventory is lower due to the season and sellers are asking for truly insane prices. There are some flippers who bought less than a year ago, installed new flooring and a kitchen, and are asking for 60%, 70% more, almost double the price they bought it for! These houses are sitting on the market for longer, and there are price reductions, but many of them get bought up. Unless inventory levels climb to pre-pandemic levels (is that possible at this point?), the market won't make sense for a long time to come.
 
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cosine

Robin
and are asking for 60%, 70% more, almost double the price they bought it for!
The devaluation of the dollar probably accounts for half of the increase, or more.
the market won't make sense for a long time to come.
I just bought a friend a gag gift -- a 10 Trillion Zimbabwe Dollar note. I don't think US inflation will end up like that anytime soon, but it isn't going to stop either.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Here's a good example of a flip:
Sold on 8/30/21 for $129,000 and now on 10/16/21 is listed for $269,900. That's a little over double the price for doing 6 weeks of renovations which includes, of course, vinyl flooring. Maybe it was a foreclosure. I predict it will sell within 3 weeks at close to asking price (I'll be surprised if it sells for under $250k). It is on 5 acres, at least.

How much renovations could he have done in 6 weeks? Probably not more than $50,000. He's looking at a huge profit for just a couple months of work.
 

nordle

Pigeon
(Ireland) Houses that qualify for mortgages are very expensive. But houses that are semi-ruined or which do not qualify for any kind of mortgage have not increased in price for me over the last 5 years. This is interesting as it implies that the availability of credit, not just the devaluing currency and limited stock of houses is to blame for the price increases.

Here in Ireland I buy ruined cottages and houses, usually sub €85k ($100k) and I refurbish them for rent long term. I lock in 10+ year deals with social housing via local government, which provides guaranteed income. I never have to see or deal with the people who live in my properties.
A typical purchase for me is $100k, put $60k of material into it and lots of my labour also. Then I rent them out. Every year I turn my normie tech job profits into a new rental property. I think I have some decent level of understanding of the property market here. International investment funds are buying 100% of new apartment blocks and housing blocks, and people with 90% mortgages are buying the rest.

The energy and vigor in the market hasn't inflated the cash-buy-rehab market.
I think this is because credit availability is linked to the huge new supply of money (devaluing of currency).
 
I need some of your advice.

I and some partners founded a startup company that is into online real estate in 2016

From the start, we knew, we had little cash but took up on this task of building this company with what we could afford.

I have spent 5 years of my time and life into the development of this startup with no results.

In 2016, when we started, we had no cash to pay for a freelancer, so we decided to get a backend freelancer, gave him some shares to become a partner with us. With the help of this new partner, we have been building slowly. Recently, we partially launched our service but it isnt market fit yet because of the lack of important features.

I just realised that we have been building for almost 5 years and no fully functional product, no revenue and nothing to show except our partially launched product, expenses like maintance of business name and bank account.

We hope to fully launch next year but i have this fear that we might not be successful because of the time, it is taking us to build this service.

Sometimes i just feel like giving up because of the fear of startups in our line of business with lot of money, anytime i tell my partner my fears, he says i should not listen to the hype but focus on developing the business.

Presently, i feel like we took lot of time to build our product instead of building and launching fast. Anyway, our constraint has been the lack of cash.

I will like to ask, do we continue building or we should close down the business and move on?

The truth is that i am a firm believer in building and growing a business till it is successful but at this moment, i am just confused.

Do you guy have any advice for me?

Thanks.
 
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Talus

Sparrow
I need some of your advice.

I and some partners founded a startup company that is into online real estate in 2016

From the start, we knew, we had little cash but took up on this task of building this company with what we could afford.

I have spent 5 years of my time and life into the development of this startup with no results.

In 2016, when we started, we had no cash to pay for a freelancer, so we decided to get a backend freelancer, gave him some shares to become a partner with us. With the help of this new partner, we have been building slowly. Recently, we partially launched our service but it isnt market fit yet because of the lack of important features.

I just realised that we have been building for almost 5 years and no fully functional product, no revenue and nothing to show except our partially launched product, expenses like maintance of business name and bank account.

We hope to fully launch next year but i have this fear that we might not be successful because of the time, it is taking us to build this service.

Sometimes i just feel like giving up because of the fear of startups in our line of business with lot of money, anytime i tell my partner my fears, he says i should not listen to the hype but focus on developing the business.

Presently, i feel like we took lot of time to build our product instead of building and launching fast. Anyway, our constraint has been the lack of cash.

I will like to ask, do we continue building or we should close down the business and move on?

The truth is that i am a firm believer in building and grow a business till its successful but at this moment, i am just confused.

Do you guy have any advice for me?

Thanks.
What type of online real estate product are you offering? What does it do? What type of value does your product/service add to the consumer? It's hard to give an opinion/advice if we don't know what goals your company is trying accomplish.

On a side note, the terms "start up," and "freelance," are red flags to me. And when you say that you have no revenue, or product, after 5 years, those red flags seem to be confirmed.
 
What type of online real estate product are you offering? What does it do? What type of value does your product/service add to the consumer? It's hard to give an opinion/advice if we don't know what goals your company is trying accomplish.

On a side note, the terms "start up," and "freelance," are red flags to me. And when you say that you have no revenue, or product, after 5 years, those red flags seem to be confirmed.

Apparently, we are into international real estate, we are creating a market place for international real estate.

What we are doing is, we make it easy for international investors to buy properties,

For instance, most online real estate sites are localised, so as an international investors, you have to navigate various local sites to get the properties you want, what we are offering is the ability for investors to get all the info they need just in one site without the hassle of searching hundreds of sites to get the properties they want. and on the agent side, the ability for them to get global attention.

We have a product but it is not fully functional for market fit because some of the features are not yet integrated in the software, Btw, we are already doing that now.

Another issue is that, our lack of funds has limited our ability to get get more programmers into our team, so we just have to use what we have to accomplish our goal.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
Here's a good example of a flip:
Sold on 8/30/21 for $129,000 and now on 10/16/21 is listed for $269,900. That's a little over double the price for doing 6 weeks of renovations which includes, of course, vinyl flooring. Maybe it was a foreclosure. I predict it will sell within 3 weeks at close to asking price (I'll be surprised if it sells for under $250k). It is on 5 acres, at least.

How much renovations could he have done in 6 weeks? Probably not more than $50,000. He's looking at a huge profit for just a couple months of work.
Labor is so valuable right now, but this is what really frustrates me as a landless wage worker. I have these skills, I've worked construction, I literally remodeled my dad's home for him in place of paying rent, but I can't capitalize on having those skills unless I got property myself, which as a goal is akin to a nightmare where you're running, and what you're pursuing is getting further away as the hallway slowly elongates.
Apparently, we are into international real estate, we are creating a market place for international real estate.

What we are doing is, we make it easy for international investors to buy properties,

For instance, most online real estate sites are localised, so as an international investors, you have to navigate various local sites to get the properties you want, what we are offering is the ability for investors to get all the info they need just in one site without the hassle of searching hundreds of sites to get the properties they want. and on the agent side, the ability for them to get global attention.

We have a product but it is not fully functional for market fit because some of the features are not yet integrated in the software, Btw, we are already doing that now.

Another issue is that, our lack of funds has limited our ability to get get more programmers into our team, so we just have to use what we have to accomplish our goal.
If your product is enabling international real estate trades, then I wish nothing but catastrophic failure for your startup.
 
Labor is so valuable right now, but this is what really frustrates me as a landless wage worker. I have these skills, I've worked construction, I literally remodeled my dad's home for him in place of paying rent, but I can't capitalize on having those skills unless I got property myself, which as a goal is akin to a nightmare where you're running, and what you're pursuing is getting further away as the hallway slowly elongates.

If your product is enabling international real estate trades, then I wish nothing but catastrophic failure for your startup.

Lol

Anyway, our idealogy are different. I am not angry at your opinion because it means nothing to me
 

SeaEagle

Sparrow
Lol

Anyway, our idealogy are different. I am not angry at your opinion because it means nothing to me
He has a point from a Christian perspective of grow where you're planted.

You have gained a lot of skills that would surely aid you in another avenue as well. You have serious reservations on the viability of the project and I would caution against operating within a sunk cost fallacy too.

Maybe you're right about it working with more money, but I don't see it as a noble aim either. Rootless internationals bring globalism 99% of the time.
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
This is obviously part of "The Great Reset" agenda.



Edit.

Corelogic reports Single-Family Investor Activity Surges in the Second Quarter.
Large investors (those who retain 100 or more properties) are largely responsible for this rise. Of all investor purchases made in June 2021, 20% were made by large investors. This is much higher than 11% in 2020 or 14% in 2019. Small investors (those who retain between 3 and 10 properties), have declined slightly and now account for less than half of investor purchases at 46% in June. Mid-sized investors (those who retain 11-99 properties) have stayed constant, oscillating around 35% percent in the past 30 months. The pandemic seemed to drive away large investors, but they are now making up their largest share of investor purchases seen in the past decade.
 
He has a point from a Christian perspective of grow where you're planted.

You have gained a lot of skills that would surely aid you in another avenue as well. You have serious reservations on the viability of the project and I would caution against operating within a sunk cost fallacy too.

Maybe you're right about it working with more money, but I don't see it as a noble aim either. Rootless internationals bring globalism 99% of the time.

I am also a Christian like him but in Ecc 11 vs 1-2

Invest your money in foreign trade, and one of these days you will make a profit. Put your investments in several places — many places, in fact — because you never know what kind of bad luck you are going to have in this world.

But nevertheless less thanks for your advice.
 

SeaEagle

Sparrow
I am also a Christian like him but in Ecc 11 vs 1-2

Invest your money in foreign trade, and one of these days you will make a profit. Put your investments in several places — many places, in fact — because you never know what kind of bad luck you are going to have in this world.

But nevertheless less thanks for your advice.
I need to read the Bible more. Thank you for sharing those verses.

I don't consider intl real estate as the same as trade however, as it seems to destroy communities from my perspective. Ill refrain from giving moral advice though, just my thoughts, could be wrong. I'm not very wealthy myself so..
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
I need to read the Bible more. Thank you for sharing those verses.

I don't consider intl real estate as the same as trade however, as it seems to destroy communities from my perspective. Ill refrain from giving moral advice though, just my thoughts, could be wrong. I'm not very wealthy myself so..
Don't go easy on that guy. His mission for the past 5 years has been to make it easier for rootless, international, urban parasites to purchase more of your homeland and distribute it to foreigners such as himself flooding into your country. Satan can quote scripture.

Displacement and migration is how the zionist banking elite running the world are trying to destroy what is left of the few ostensibly white & Christian nations. Anyone enabling that is actively working against your future.
 
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