Recipes

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
Always looking for new recipes from family traditions or food that is easy to make; Hopefully more individuals could share.

This one was passed down from my Polish Grandfather, and was always a favorite among our family because it used dried cheese (cottage cheese) instead of potato and cheddar.

Pierogies - dried cheese and onion

Dough
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1/3 cup of Milk
  • 2 cups of flour
  • Dash of salt
Work dough (knead) with hands.
Keep adding flour until dough is elastic and does not stick to hands.
Cut in half – roll out until thin.
Cut in four sections – makes eight or nine pierogies.

Filling
  • 16-ounce cottage cheese
  • Small diced sweet (suggest Vidalia – sweet)
  • Salt and pepper for taste
    • Cottage cheese (dry) – If cannot obtain dry can use regular container cottage cheese
      • For regular cottage cheese – put in colander and press to remove liquid​
      • Leave in colander for 30 minutes​
    • Add onion, salt, pepper, and cheese to bowl​

We make large pierogies, but most individuals cut out circles in the prepared dough and fold over with filling in the center. Half circle filled with cheese is the final product.
Secure your folded over pierogie with brushing egg to seal in the inside, and then use a fork (like a pie crust) and push down to keep the filling in.

Boil 20 minutes. Cool. - Can wrap and store in freezer too.
To eat - Fry in hot butter frying pan – make sure the pan is hot and enough butter.
Add sour cream, green onions, and salt- pepper for taste.

There are recipes online, but this one is our family’s recipe. It took us awhile to perfect.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Always looking for new recipes from family traditions or food that is easy to make; Hopefully more individuals could share.

This one was passed down from my Polish Grandfather, and was always a favorite among our family because it used dried cheese (cottage cheese) instead of potato and cheddar.



There are recipes online, but this one is our family’s recipe. It took us awhile to perfect.
We make pierogi also, although our recipe is a little different. Only water, flour, and a dash of salt for the dough and we cut ours to about 3.5 inches in length. You can pretty much fill them with whatever you like but we usually do burger, onion, carrot, and a heaping amount of fresh dill. I actually use a pasta roller to get the dough really thin and even. They do freeze really well.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I learned these two really useful tips this year. One for a traditional crispy bread crust and the other for when a soup/chili/stew turn out too sour or acrid.

*********

Tip #1
For a beautiful crispy boule bread loaf:
Instead of baking it on a baking sheet, bake it in a Dutch Oven. (Make sure it is solid cast iron that can withstand high heat and that the little knob on top won’t melt. I haven’t had any trouble using this method with my Creuset Dutch Oven).

Make your bread according to the recipe that you use but in the final proof have it rise in a *parchment* lined bowl. Meanwhile, when the dough is almost done rising, heat your oven with the Dutch Oven *in it* at 450 degrees for 30 minutes. The idea is to heat up the Dutch Oven like a little mini-oven.

When your bread looks ready to bake, get your fingers wet and lightly wet the top of the dough and make the slashes on top, also get about 1/3 cup of water set aside. *Carefully* pull the Dutch Oven out of the oven and get ready to place the boule. Make sure you always use an oven mitt! The lid will be hot! Lift and place the parchment lined boule into the pot and pour the water *under* the parchment (there will be hot steam, so be careful). Quickly cover with the lid to in all the steam and place back into the oven.

Bake for 25-30 minutes in the Dutch Oven. Then remove the loaf from the Dutch Oven and the parchment and bake for another 5-10 minutes until golden. Let cool completely before slicing otherwise the inside will turn gummy.

**********

Tip #2
How to fix a sour or acrid soup, chili, stew, or pasta sauce.

Did you burn the bottom of the stew? Were the tomatoes not quite ripe enough? You can use baking soda (instead of sugar) to neutralize the acid and make it more palatable.

Sprinkle the contents with a bit of baking soda. (If the bottom of a stew/chili was burned, move to a fresh pot being careful to leave the burned bits behind). Don’t use too much or it will alter the flavor of the dish! Start with a *quarter teaspoon* and stir in until it completely stops fizzing, about a minute. Do a taste test and repeat if necessary.
 

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
I learned these two really useful tips this year. One for a traditional crispy bread crust and the other for when a soup/chili/stew turn out too sour or acrid.
Thank you for sharing. We are making bread this week and have always wanted the crispy bread crust.
And baking soda is an amazing kitchen stable: toothpaste base, cleaning agent on showers, cooking, etc.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Great thread idea! I will be posting my Italian family sauce recipe that’s been handed down forever. I know most of it in my head but I will have to check the hand written index card that my grandma left so I can verify a few measurements for you all.
 

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
Great thread idea! I will be posting my Italian family sauce recipe that’s been handed down forever. I know most of it in my head but I will have to check the hand written index card that my grandma left so I can verify a few measurements for you all.

Excited to see your family recipe! Hand written recipes from grandparents are a cherished moment in time! You are blessed!

I did not spend as much time with my Italian great grandmother growing up as I should have, and regret it now.
Peace be with you LeeLoo!
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Excited to see your family recipe! Hand written recipes from grandparents are a cherished moment in time! You are blessed!

I did not spend as much time with my Italian great grandmother growing up as I should have, and regret it now.
Peace be with you LeeLoo!
Thank you, and also with you! I inherited the family tin box with all the index card recipes and I’ve found some gems for sure. The collection is one of my favorite things since all the grandparents have been gone for years now.

There’s a “bread salad/pudding/stuffing” recipe that’s also a favorite from my other grandma. I’m not sure how to describe it but it’s sooooo good.

I’m planning to choose the best ones and spend some time typing them out for you all tomorrow.
 

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
Zuppa Soup

There are many ways to make this soup with different ingredient portions. Soup will have more flavor the following day.

Over medium-high heat in large pot add olive oil to warm (1 tablespoon)

Add minced garlic (to taste or 9 cloves) and then 1 medium chopped onion

Add and brown ground chorizo sausage (1 pound; or plain sausage) use utensil to break up meat

Add red pepper flakes, salt, pepper, and pre-made bacon bits (5 ounces)

Add chicken of stock (32 ounces) and bring to boil

Add cubed red-skinned potatoes (6-7) and allow potatoes to break down about 13-14 minutes

Add heavy whipping cream (1 pint) and stir

Add chopped kale (about half a bunch)

Garnish with shredded Parmesan cheese

Serve with rustic crusty bread and butter
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
I received an Instant Pot for my birthday this year. I’m still learning about it and used it for some simple recipes so far. It was great for mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving. I just finished a pot roast for tonight’s dinner that is incredibly juicy, meat falling apart just right, and a nice gravy for the potatoes and veggies. Those of you with an Instant Pot, what do you think of it? Do you have favorite recipes?
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I received an Instant Pot for my birthday this year. I’m still learning about it and used it for some simple recipes so far. It was great for mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving. I just finished a pot roast for tonight’s dinner that is incredibly juicy, meat falling apart just right, and a nice gravy for the potatoes and veggies. Those of you with an Instant Pot, what do you think of it? Do you have favorite recipes?

I really love mine now that I’ve explored it’s uses. I was disappointed at first, so I checked out a book on learning your instant pot which helped me figure it out. The directions it came with are useless. I love rice in mine, but then I love sticky chewy rice. It makes crazy good boiled eggs. Once I’m over the rona I plan on getting into make-ahead meals I can toss into it. I don’t really have any favorite instant pot-specific recipes as I tend to use it for my regular recipes like chili or soup. It never fails to cook meat like you described—-falling apart. Mmmm.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Has anyone tried making homemade cheese or yogurt? I’ve read that it’s pretty easy to make but I’m skeptical of recipes I’ve read online and don’t want to waste milk
 
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Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Has anyone tried making homemade cheese or yogurt? I’ve read that it’s pretty easy to make but I’m skeptical of recipes I’ve read online and don’t want to waste milk lol
I used to make homemade yogurt all the time when I was on a special diet for my crohn’s. It was fermented 24 hours to remove all the lactose and was full of probiotics. The basics are boil the milk, let it cool to a certain temp, add starter (I used Dannon plain full fat yogurt), mix well, and keep at a certain temp for 24 hours. The best yogurt is made with half and half!

The first time I used my instant pot to make yogurt I popped the release valve too soon. Yogurt spewed forth to the ceiling and all over the cabinets. It was biblical.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I used to make homemade yogurt all the time when I was on a special diet for my crohn’s. It was fermented 24 hours to remove all the lactose and was full of probiotics. The basics are boil the milk, let it cool to a certain temp, add starter (I used Dannon plain full fat yogurt), mix well, and keep at a certain temp for 24 hours. The best yogurt is made with half and half!

The first time I used my instant pot to make yogurt I popped the release valve too soon. Yogurt spewed forth to the ceiling and all over the cabinets. It was biblical.
Oh no! It hope it wasn’t too much of a mess. I know I still find bits of whipped cream splatters on the kitchen backboard and under the cabinets weeks later lol

Would you mind sharing the specific recipe? My husband and kids probably eat about a gallons worth of yogurt each month and I’m sure homemade is much better than the store bought. Would you say most recipes online are about what you make?
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Okay I need some instapot recipes too. I got one as a wedding gift and haven't used it yet. It's kinda intimidating me with all the settings, much more complex than a crockpot! I'm going to have to spend a day researching how to use it so I don't make a mess with the pressure valve
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Oh no! It hope it wasn’t too much of a mess. I know I still find bits of whipped cream splatters on the kitchen backboard and under the cabinets weeks later lol

Would you mind sharing the specific recipe? My husband and kids probably eat about a gallons worth of yogurt each month and I’m sure homemade is much better than the store bought. Would you say most recipes online are about what you make?

Oh it was a disaster, lol!! Most recipes online aren’t fermented 24 hours, at least the ones I’ve seen. Do you have a yogurt maker or instant pot? I’ll hunt up the recipe. You can make it using a heating pad even.

This is pretty much the same as the recipe I used except I had a yogurt maker. The longer fermentation (24 hours) will eat up the lactose and maximize the probiotics.

 
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Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Okay I need some instapot recipes too. I got one as a wedding gift and haven't used it yet. It's kinda intimidating me with all the settings, much more complex than a crockpot! I'm going to have to spend a day researching how to use it so I don't make a mess with the pressure valve
Check out the YouTube channel Pressure Luck Cooking. They have a video called “How to get started with your instant pot” that was more helpful than anything else I found.
If not for that video, I probably never would have started using mine. The Instant Pot app is also useful for recipes from easy to experienced and it walks you through step by step.

edit: I’d link to the video, but I’m not sure how or if we are allowed.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Okay I need some instapot recipes too. I got one as a wedding gift and haven't used it yet. It's kinda intimidating me with all the settings, much more complex than a crockpot! I'm going to have to spend a day researching how to use it so I don't make a mess with the pressure valve

Putting a kitchen towel over the release valve is what I do now after cleaning up a couple of explosions.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Check out the YouTube channel Pressure Luck Cooking. They have a video called “How to get started with your instant pot” that was more helpful than anything else I found.
If not for that video, I probably never would have started using mine. The Instant Pot app is also useful for recipes from easy to experienced and it walks you through step by step.

edit: I’d link to the video, but I’m not sure how or if we are allowed.
I love his channel. He makes some really yummy recipes and explains things so well.
 
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