Recipes

Starlight

Robin
Oh it was a disaster, lol!! Most recipes online aren’t fermented 24 hours, at least the ones I’ve seen. Do you have a yogurt maker or instant pot? I’ll hunt up the recipe. You can make it using a heating pad even.

This is pretty much the same as the recipe I used except I had a yogurt maker. The longer fermentation (24 hours) will eat up the lactose and maximize the probiotics.

I don’t have a yogurt maker or instant pot but I think I could probably leave it in the oven with the “proof” setting. Thank you so much!
 

Debra

Chicken
Hello Ladies! I have a recipe for Classic German Schweine-Schnitzel that my husband really enjoys. I will share it here if anyone is interested.

Ingredients
1 pork loin roast
1 c + 1 1/2 Tb flour, divided
3 eggs
2 cups dry bread crumbs (5 bread slices worth)
salt & pepper
Butter & olive oil, as needed
7 slices bacon
1/3 c onion, finely diced
1 c vegetable broth
1 1/2 c half & half
1 tsp thyme
1 Tb parsley
Egg noodles (like spaetzle – cooked according to package directions)

Instructions
To begin, take the pork loin roast and cut it into half-inch thick slices. Place a couple slices in a gallon sized zip-lock bag, and give them a bash with the bottom of a heavy skillet. The cutlets should be about 1/4 inch thick. Repeat that with all of your cutlets.
Now you’ll need three shallow dishes. In dish, place a cup or so of flour, in the second, beat the three eggs, and in the third, you’ll need some dry bread crumbs. My bread crumbs are semi-dry. I took about 5 slices of bread and toasted them. Then let them cool, ripped them in a couple pieces and pulverized them in my food processor. Tadaa!!! Instant fresh "dry" bread crumbs. You will also need some salt and pepper. Set these all up in an area like a "dipping station." Salt and pepper both sides of a cutlet. Dredge it in the flour. Dip it in the egg. And then coat it with the bread crumbs. I give it a little press so they stick well. Set the cutlet on a plate, and do another.
In a heavy skillet, heat up a tablespoon each of butter and olive oil. You want your skillet to be well heated, but not smoking hot. Place however many cutlets will fit comfortably in your skillet. Cook them about 3 minutes on each side, until beautiful and golden, and place them in a dish to keep warm in your oven. Set your oven to its lowest temperature if it doesn’t have a "warm" setting.
While the cutlets cook, prepare your next skillet-full of cutlets, so they are ready to go. Add more butter & oil as needed. Repeat until all of the cutlets are cooked. The next part only takes a few minutes, so go ahead and turn off your oven. The cutlets will still be warm, and you don’t want them to dry out.
Dice up the slices of bacon, and finely dice a third cup of onion. In the same skillet that you cooked the pork in, sauté the bacon and onion together until the onions are tender and the bacon is just browned. Stir in a tablespoon and a half of flour. Let that cook a minute over medium heat and get a little bubbly. Whisk in a cup of vegetable broth, half & half, thyme and parsley.
Let that come to a gentle boil, whisking continually. As soon as it begins to boil, it will be a tad thickened, and it is done!
Serve the schnitzel with noodles, topped with your amazing gravy. I used spaetzle, but any egg noodle will do.
Enjoy!

 

Debra

Chicken
I learned these two really useful tips this year. One for a traditional crispy bread crust and the other for when a soup/chili/stew turn out too sour or acrid.

*********

Tip #1
For a beautiful crispy boule bread loaf:
Instead of baking it on a baking sheet, bake it in a Dutch Oven. (Make sure it is solid cast iron that can withstand high heat and that the little knob on top won’t melt. I haven’t had any trouble using this method with my Creuset Dutch Oven).

Make your bread according to the recipe that you use but in the final proof have it rise in a *parchment* lined bowl. Meanwhile, when the dough is almost done rising, heat your oven with the Dutch Oven *in it* at 450 degrees for 30 minutes. The idea is to heat up the Dutch Oven like a little mini-oven.

When your bread looks ready to bake, get your fingers wet and lightly wet the top of the dough and make the slashes on top, also get about 1/3 cup of water set aside. *Carefully* pull the Dutch Oven out of the oven and get ready to place the boule. Make sure you always use an oven mitt! The lid will be hot! Lift and place the parchment lined boule into the pot and pour the water *under* the parchment (there will be hot steam, so be careful). Quickly cover with the lid to in all the steam and place back into the oven.

Bake for 25-30 minutes in the Dutch Oven. Then remove the loaf from the Dutch Oven and the parchment and bake for another 5-10 minutes until golden. Let cool completely before slicing otherwise the inside will turn gummy.

**********

Tip #2
How to fix a sour or acrid soup, chili, stew, or pasta sauce.

Did you burn the bottom of the stew? Were the tomatoes not quite ripe enough? You can use baking soda (instead of sugar) to neutralize the acid and make it more palatable.

Sprinkle the contents with a bit of baking soda. (If the bottom of a stew/chili was burned, move to a fresh pot being careful to leave the burned bits behind). Don’t use too much or it will alter the flavor of the dish! Start with a *quarter teaspoon* and stir in until it completely stops fizzing, about a minute. Do a taste test and repeat if necessary.

These are wonderful tips! Looking forward to trying them both (I do seem to struggle perfecting a couple of my stews). Thanks for sharing!
 

Starlight

Robin
These are wonderful tips! Looking forward to trying them both (I do seem to struggle perfecting a couple of my stews). Thanks for sharing!
Just be very sparing with the baking soda. You only need a little. And for something that was burned, it won’t totally fix it but can hopefully salvage it so it’s edible lol. But it does work well with sour tomato bases like pasta or chili. I made a goulash once where I overcooked the paprika making it bitter and the baking soda helped to correct the flavor. But it’s better not to burn it in the first place lol!
Hello Ladies! I have a recipe for Classic German Schweine-Schnitzel that my husband really enjoys. I will share it here if anyone is interested.
This looks really good. My husband loves veal schnitzel but I’m horrible at frying anything. It comes out either burnt on the outside and raw in the middle or soggy. I bought an electric skillet (with a temperature dial) which has helped but still can’t seem to get that nice crisp.
 

Feyoder

Kingfisher
This looks really good. My husband loves veal schnitzel but I’m horrible at frying anything. It comes out either burnt on the outside and raw in the middle or soggy. I bought an electric skillet (with a temperature dial) which has helped but still can’t seem to get that nice crisp.

Are you deep frying the schnitzel? It's a little expensive but there's no substitute for the result.
 

Mrs.DanielH

Sparrow
Hello Ladies! I have a recipe for Classic German Schweine-Schnitzel that my husband really enjoys. I will share it here if anyone is interested.
Can't wait to try this recipe! I love a good German dish. :) ever try making stuffed schnitzel? One of my favorites is ham and cheese stuffed schnitzel.
 
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Lamkins

Robin
When we traveled out west last year I discovered the delights of Runzas. It’s meat and cabbage stuffed bread rolls. I’ve tried a couple recipes online, which were good. Does anyone here have a recipe? We love them.
 
When we traveled out west last year I discovered the delights of Runzas. It’s meat and cabbage stuffed bread rolls. I’ve tried a couple recipes online, which were good. Does anyone here have a recipe? We love them.

That sounds delicious!

My grandparents use to make stuffed cabbage, but we never had it within bread rolls.
Oh the things he would cook and bake! Pyszne!
Thank you Lamkins for the recipe idea to search out.

Edit: Thank you @Starlight for sharing the recipe!
 
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Starlight

Robin
Are you deep frying the schnitzel? It's a little expensive but there's no substitute for the result.
No, I use an electric skillet with about a half inch to inch worth of oil when I fry anything which isn’t very often so I think I really just need more practice.
When we traveled out west last year I discovered the delights of Runzas. It’s meat and cabbage stuffed bread rolls. I’ve tried a couple recipes online, which were good. Does anyone here have a recipe? We love them.
I do!

Sorry if my measurements aren’t exact. My mom taught me how to make these and the way she measures is more like “This looks about right” lol.

For the dough:
I use a basic dinner roll recipe. Frozen dinner rolls from the grocery work well too. Make enough for two dozen rolls.

For the filling:
1 lb. ground burger
1/2 head of green cabbage chopped
1 white onion diced
1 teaspoon whole caraway seeds
Salt and pepper
Olive oil
Egg and a little water for an egg wash before baking.

Start by getting your dough ready (or thawed according to the package directions). You’ll assemble the runza before the final rise.

Using a medium sized pot with a lid, brown the burger in a little olive oil and drain any drippings. Set aside.

In the same pot, add a little oil and the onion and cook on medium/medium-low with the lid on stirring occasionally. Don’t let them brown. You want the onions to get soft and translucent and “sweat” as the pro’s say.

Once the onions are cooked, add in the cabbage, stir, and put the lid back on. Stir occasionally until the cabbage is wilted.

Add the burger back into the pot and combine with onion/cabbage mixture. Add in the caraway seeds and salt and pepper to taste. I actually add in more caraway seeds than a teaspoon because I really like their flavor.

The mixture needs to cool completely. I put the filling into a bowl and stick it in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. If it’s not cool, it will make the dough soggy.

To assemble:
Each runza will need about three dinner rolls worth of dough or a little less than the size of a baseball, 2/3 cup I guess. Using your hands or a floured rolling pin, press the dough into the shape you want. The dough should be a little thicker than a quarter inch. (The traditional shape is to make the dough into a kind of oblong oval but I’ve made them in circles too.)

Fill the dough with a scoop of cabbage mixture, about a half cup (maybe more if you can fit it). If you’re doing a long runza, spread the filling like a log in the center of the dough. If you’re doing a circle, just place it in the middle. Pinch the dough closed over the filling, flip over, and place seam side down on a greased baking sheet. Repeat this process until the filling and dough are used up. I freeze any leftover filling.

To bake:
Preheat oven according to your dinner roll recipe. Allow the assembled runza to have their final rise. Once they’re risen, brush each one with egg-wash and put them in the oven until golden brown.
 
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Lamkins

Robin
No, I use an electric skillet with about a half inch to inch worth of oil when I fry anything which isn’t very often so I think I really just need more practice.

I do!

Sorry if my measurements aren’t exact. My mom taught me how to make these and the way she measures is more like “This looks about right” lol.

For the dough:
I use a basic dinner roll recipe. Frozen dinner rolls from the grocery work well too. Make enough for two dozen rolls.

For the filling:
1 lb. ground burger
1/2 head of green cabbage chopped
1 white onion diced
1 teaspoon whole caraway seeds
Salt and pepper
Olive oil
Egg and a little water for an egg wash before baking.

Start by getting your dough ready (or thawed according to the package directions). You’ll assemble the runza before the final rise.

Using a medium sized pot with a lid, brown the burger in a little olive oil and drain any drippings. Set aside.

In the same pot, add a little oil and the onion and cook on medium/medium-low with the lid on stirring occasionally. Don’t let them brown. You want the onions to get soft and translucent and “sweat” as the pro’s say.

Once the onions are cooked, add in the cabbage, stir, and put the lid back on. Stir occasionally until the cabbage is wilted.

Add the burger back into the pot and combine with onion/cabbage mixture. Add in the caraway seeds and salt and pepper to taste. I actually add in more caraway seeds than a teaspoon because I really like their flavor.

The mixture needs to cool completely. I put the filling into a bowl and stick it in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. If it’s not cool, it will make the dough soggy.

To assemble:
Each runza will need about three dinner rolls worth of dough or a little less than the size of a baseball, 2/3 cup I guess. Using your hands or a floured rolling pin, press the dough into the shape you want. The dough should be a little thicker than a quarter inch. (The traditional shape is to make the dough into a kind of oblong oval but I’ve made them in circles too.)

Fill the dough with a scoop of cabbage mixture, about a half cup (maybe more if you can fit it). If you’re doing a long runza, spread the filling like a log in the center of the dough. If you’re doing a circle, just place it in the middle. Pinch the dough closed over the filling, flip over, and place seam side down on a greased baking sheet. Repeat this process until the filling and dough are used up. I freeze any leftover filling.

To bake:
Preheat oven according to your dinner roll recipe. Allow the assembled runza to have their final rise. Once they’re risen, brush each one with egg-wash and put them in the oven until golden brown.

Thank you, thank you!! I’m looking forward to making these once I feel better. When I first had one in Nebraska on our way to Wyoming at the drive-thru I thought “Hmmm, they’re okay.” But they grow on you. On our way back home I was watching everywhere for the Runza place!,
 

Mac

Pigeon
Hi ladies
Here is a super easy recipe for pastry that I use all the time. The sour cream protects the pastry from being overworked and is easier to handle than shortcrust pastry in hot weather.

My mother saw me making this last week and said my great grandmother used to win baking competitions for her fruit mince pies and that her secret was using sour cream pastry with a bit of orange juice in it.

250g flour
200g chilled butter
120g sour cream

Rub/mix the butter into the flour, the same as for shortcrust pastry, then mix in the sour cream and chill in the fridge for 20 mins before rolling it out.
 
My mother saw me making this last week and said my great grandmother used to win baking competitions for her fruit mince pies and that her secret was using sour cream pastry with a bit of orange juice in it.

What a nice moment/exchange between you and your mother about your grandmother's secret win.
Thank you for sharing. Bless you.
 

Lamkins

Robin
Here are 2 very easy and tasty recipes for Beef Patties In Onion Gravy and Baked Teriyaki Chicken Thighs. Both are regularly on our table.

BEEF PATTIES IN ONION GRAVY
Patties
1-1/2 lb ground beef
1 egg
1⁄2 cup dry breadcrumbs
1⁄2 envelope dry onion soup mix
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1⁄8 teaspoon pepper

Gravy
1⁄2 envelope dry onion soup mix
2 cups water
2 tablespoons flour

DIRECTIONS
Combine all patty ingredients;mix thouroughly with your hands and shape into 8 patties. Spray a non-stick skillet, and brown patties on both sides. Remove patties. Add 2-3 TB flour and cook for a minute. Add dry onion soup mix and 2 cups water. Stir thoroughly till it comes to a simmer, add patties, cover pan tightly and simmer for 20 minutes. Serve with mashed potatoes or hot cooked noodles.


BAKED TERIYAKI THIGHS
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon cold water
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
8-12 boneless skinless chicken thighs

Directions

In a small saucepan over low heat, combine the cornstarch, cold water, sugar, soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, ginger and ground black pepper. Let simmer, stirring frequently, until sauce thickens and bubbles.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Place chicken pieces in a lightly greased 9×13 inch baking dish. Pour sauce over chicken. Cover and bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes. Turn pieces over, and bake for another 30 minutes, until no longer pink and juices run clear.

Notes- I usually triple the sauce, add broccoli to the chicken pan, and serve over rice.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
BAKED TERIYAKI THIGHS
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon cold water
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
8-12 boneless skinless chicken thighs
Do-it-yourself teriyaki anything is an artform. I just did that exact formula but on a fish. Wow. It was awful! I mean that with all due respect considering your ingredients are for chickens. I'm also not good at spoons. Tea versus table, I always over do it. There's plenty of fish in the sea so will try again.

Aloha!
 
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PVW

Pigeon
I bake several times per week. Whole grain breakfast rolls are a basic staple. It's a fun routine. I boil a pot of water in the kettle for my morning tea and save the remaining amount for making dough. I have breakfast while the water cools down, typically within half an hour, which is sufficient time for the water to become warm enough for baking.

3 cups flour
1 cup oatmeal
1 packet of yeast
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup of warm water
1/4 cup canola oil
2 tsp canola oil for the baking dish

Mix all the ingredients thoroughly with a mixing spoon then knead with your hands until the dough is firm. Let it sit for several hours so that the dough can rise. Once it has risen, turn on the oven and knead some more. Add a bit of flour if it's too sticky and not firm.

Once the oven is at 350 degrees, grease a baking dish with the 2 tsp canola oil. Shape the dough into whatever number of rolls you like and place onto the greased baking dish. Bake for about 30-35 minutes or until the rolls are golden brown.
 
I bake several times per week. Whole grain breakfast rolls are a basic staple. It's a fun routine. I boil a pot of water in the kettle for my morning tea and save the remaining amount for making dough. I have breakfast while the water cools down, typically within half an hour, which is sufficient time for the water to become warm enough for baking.

Sounds so easy! Writing down the recipe.

What tea is your go to in the morning?
For the last three years I have been drinking matcha green tea in the morning and throughout the day for energy.
I guess the water temperature should not be at a boiling point for matcha - damages the taste and benefits.
 
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PVW

Pigeon
It is easy. But it was one I came up with over time. My mom taught me when I was in junior high school and I'd gotten good enough over the years not to have to measure anything, until I happened to look up recipes in a cookbook I had. The measures were so precise for making dough that I adopted it for whatever I had in mind to bake.

I typically have black tea, nothing unusual, including something like an Early Grey or English Breakfast teatime. As for the hot water for my tea, the kettle whistles once the water is boiling, so I know to turn it off.

But the fun part is that I got a brown betty tea pot and it's fantastic. I just let it steep for a few minutes and have the tea with cream or fresh lemon: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Betty_(teapot)

So if I let the water cool while I drink my tea, the water won't be so hot that it will kill the yeast.
 
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