Recipes

Family recipe Italian meat sauce

Do you make this sauce often? My wife cooks from scratch weekly and we go back and forth about making marinara sauce because of the cost. It always seems so cheap at the store. We make pesto with basil grown at home, which is a great price. We also make some cream sauces. Do you recommend adding marinara to the arsenal?
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Do you make this sauce often? My wife cooks from scratch weekly and we go back and forth about making marinara sauce because of the cost. It always seems so cheap at the store. We make pesto with basil grown at home, which is a great price. We also make some cream sauces. Do you recommend adding marinara to the arsenal?
Because it’s so time intensive, this recipe is usually made only at major holidays or birthdays. Sometimes I get ambitious and make it “just because” and due to it making a lot and freezing well, we will have some on hand for awhile.

But yeah, outside of making this a few times a year, I have no problem buying (good quality) store bought jar sauce. And like you said, it’s nice to try a cream sauce or other type for pasta night to switch it up. I

I have family style recipes as well for white sauce (for manicotti) and vodka type “pink” sauce that I plan to post shortly. Between the different types of sauce, there’s such a variety of things you can make.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Let m
Do you make this sauce often? My wife cooks from scratch weekly and we go back and forth about making marinara sauce because of the cost. It always seems so cheap at the store. We make pesto with basil grown at home, which is a great price. We also make some cream sauces. Do you recommend adding marinara to the arsenal?
Let me add that you can always double and triple this because it does freeze well. Your wife can potentially spend a day on this and make enough for many future meals.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
I’m willing to bet you have some great fish recipes. Seafood isn’t normally my forte, but I’m hoping to branch out and brush up on some new dishes for Lent this year.

Indeed I do. This is the best and easiest one...

Sweet Chili Black Marlin.

1) Get some black marlin steaks
images


2) Cut them in half so they are the longest

3) Get one of those glass dishes like you made that lasagna in

4) put maybe 6 of them in there

5) Get 1 large bottle of Mae Ploy

51OYoPTpNJL._PIbundle-2,TopRight,0,0_SX415SY500SH20_.jpg


6) pour that all over the fish

7) Put a lid or some heavy saran wrap on the glass dish and proceed to shake the living dickens out of it. Up and down, side to side, back and forth, flip it upside down, all of that. Then do it some more.

8) Refrigerate the well shaken dish. Leave it until the fish feels cold, but not at all frozen. This is key.

9) Light up a charcoal grill. Get it very hot. About the same time it takes for the fish to get cold.

10) About 5 minutes per side.

11) Eat!

This is good with rice. I ate this with rice eggs and papaya for breakfast. It's good with various sharks too, but you have to get the steaks in the sauce, shaken, and into the refrigerator about 20 minutes from pulling it out of the water or else it will taste very ammonia-ish. Ive tried with lighter fishes, and it just doesn't hold. I hope you like it.

Aloha!
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Indeed I do. This is the best and easiest one...

Sweet Chili Black Marlin.

1) Get some black marlin steaks
images


2) Cut them in half so they are the longest

3) Get one of those glass dishes like you made that lasagna in

4) put maybe 6 of them in there

5) Get 1 large bottle of Mae Ploy

51OYoPTpNJL._PIbundle-2,TopRight,0,0_SX415SY500SH20_.jpg


6) pour that all over the fish

7) Put a lid or some heavy saran wrap on the glass dish and proceed to shake the living dickens out of it. Up and down, side to side, back and forth, flip it upside down, all of that. Then do it some more.

8) Refrigerate the well shaken dish. Leave it until the fish feels cold, but not at all frozen. This is key.

9) Light up a charcoal grill. Get it very hot. About the same time it takes for the fish to get cold.

10) About 5 minutes per side.

11) Eat!

This is good with rice. I ate this with rice eggs and papaya for breakfast. It's good with various sharks too, but you have to get the steaks in the sauce, shaken, and into the refrigerator about 20 minutes from pulling it out of the water or else it will taste very ammonia-ish. Ive tried with lighter fishes, and it just doesn't hold. I hope you like it.

Aloha!
Thanks!

it’s funny you mention shark steaks. I’ve been trying to track down good quality shark, or even swordfish, steaks in my area. They are not readily accessible, but with a little luck at certain seasons I have found them. The sauce is easy enough, we have many markets that carry that exact one. Looking forward to this.

Edit: are swordfish and marlin the same? Just realized this.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
This is a great recipe for Steak and Ale Pie from BBC, perfect for a drizzly or snowy winter day:

Ingredients​

For the rough puff pastry​

  • 225g/8oz plain flour, plus extra for rolling out
  • ½ tsp fine salt
  • 250g/9oz unsalted butter, cold but not rock hard (or you can use half butter, half lard)
  • 150ml/¼ pint ice-cold water
  • 1 free-range egg, beaten, to glaze

For the filling​

Method
  1. For the pastry, sift the flour and the salt into a large mixing bowl, then put into the fridge for a few minutes to chill. (Keeping the flour and bowl cold will help you to get a better result later and create nice separate layers or pastry.)
  2. Meanwhile, cut the butter into small cubes. Using a round-bladed knife, stir it into the bowl until each piece is well coated with flour. Pour in the water, then, working quickly, use the knife to bring everything together to a rough dough.
  3. Gather the dough in the bowl using one hand, then turn it onto a work surface. Squash the dough into a fat, flat sausage, without kneading. Wrap in cling film then chill it in the fridge for 15 minutes.
  4. Lightly flour the work surface and the pastry. Roll out the pastry in one direction until it’s about 1cm thick and three times as long as it is wide, or about 45x15cm/18x6in. Straighten up the sides using your hands now and again, and try to keep the top and bottom edges as square as possible.
  5. Fold the bottom third of the pastry up, then the top third down, to make a block about 15x15cm/6x6in. It doesn’t matter if the pastry isn’t exactly the right size, the important thing is that the corners are square.
  6. Turn the dough so that its open edge is facing to the right, like a book. Press the edges of the pastry together using the rolling pin.
  7. Roll out and fold the pastry again, repeating this four times in all to make a smooth dough, with buttery streaks here and there. If the pastry feels greasy at any point, or starts to spring back when as you roll, then cover and chill it for 10 minutes before continuing. Chill the finished pastry for an hour, or ideally overnight, before using.
  8. For the filling, mix the beef with the flour and some salt and pepper. An easy way to do this without making too much mess is to put everything into a large food bag, seal, then shake well.
  9. Heat a tablespoon of the oil in a large heatproof casserole up to a medium heat, then add half the beef, shaking off the excess flour and keeping the chunks well spaced so they fry rather than sweat. Brown for about 10 minutes, until golden-brown all over.
  10. Transfer the first batch of meat to a bowl, then add a splash of brown ale or water to the pan and scrape up any meaty bits. Tip the liquid into the bowl of meat. Wipe out the pan, then add a tablespoon of oil and brown the second batch of beef. When the beef is golden-brown transfer it to the bowl and set aside.
  11. Add the final spoon of oil to the pan and heat gently. Add the garlic, onions, carrots, celery and herbs to the pan and fry for a few minutes, until softened.
  12. Put the beef back into the pan. Pour in the stock and brown ale, then add the tomato purée and balsamic vinegar. If necessary, add a little more stock or hot water to ensure the meat is covered in liquid (this will prevent the beef from drying out). Bring to the boil, then cover and simmer the stew for 1–1½ hours until the beef is almost tender and the sauce has thickened. Set aside to cool, overnight if possible.
  13. Melt the butter in a large frying pan, then add the mushrooms. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper, then fry over a high heat for 5 minutes, or until golden-brown. Mix with the cooled pie filling and add to the pie dish.
  14. To make the pie, preheat the oven to 200C/Fan 180C/Gas 6. Flour the work surface, then roll out the pastry to the thickness of two £1 coins and wide enough to cover a family-size pie dish with some excess. Brush the edge of the pie dish with a little water or beaten egg.
  15. Use a sharp knife to cut the pastry to fit the top of the dish – if it’s too big it doesn’t matter. Lift on top of the pie, laying the pastry over a rolling pin to lift it. Press down gently to seal.
  16. Holding the knife blade horizontally, make a patterned edge by pressing down gently all around the edge of the pastry (this will help the layers in the pastry to puff up).
  17. Cut a couple of slits in the top of the pie to release steam. Brush the top of the pie with the beaten egg – taking care to avoid getting egg on the edges of the pastry as it will stick the layers together. Chill for 10 minutes, or until the pastry is firm. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the pastry is golden-brown and puffed all over.
A few alterations that I did when I made this:
- I used brown Baby Belle mushrooms
- Added about 4 dashes of Worcestershire sauce
-Used chuck/stew meat and cut it into inch cubes
-I also used frozen puff pastry instead, so I don’t know how good the pastry part of this recipe is

This steak and ale pie was so hearty and had such a wonderful rich flavor. Very tasty!
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
If you are wanting to try or find authentic appalachain/southern cooking recipies this is the place https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC547XA_zfSXKLaqe-GAiXCg

It's not overdone hipster heirloom ingredients and its also not Paula Deen 'shabby chic'. It's normal southern food that I would have at my neighbors houses or diners in the area the woman who makes the videos resides in. For the most part they are good, practical and fast meals for normal people on a budget vs. "foodies". She also throws in a healthy dose of Jesus into the videos, which is never a bad thing.

The 2 ingredient biscuits are the best if you have ever attempted to make "real" biscuits before.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Being from Argentina, Italian food is my all time comfort food. I love this website of authentic and simple Italian recipes
www.memoriediangelina.com
Looks good, thank you for sharing!


Edit: just noticed the second recipe is fried cardoons!! I just posted elsewhere asking if anyone knew about cardoons. I miss these from my family’s traditional recipes and I just found a local produce supplier to special order me a shipment of cardoons so I can recreate the fried yumminess of holidays past!
 
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Camellia

Pigeon
Woman
Looks good, thank you for sharing!


Edit: just noticed the second recipe is fried cardoons!! I just posted elsewhere asking if anyone knew about cardoons. I miss these from my family’s traditional recipes and I just found a local produce supplier to special order me a shipment of cardoons so I can recreate the fried yumminess of holidays past!
Oh wow, that's great! I've never tried cardoons but they look good. I hope it's a good recipe :)
 

theodora

Chicken
Woman
Always looking for new recipes from family traditions or food that is easy to make; Hopefully more individuals could share.

This one was passed down from my Polish Grandfather, and was always a favorite among our family because it used dried cheese (cottage cheese) instead of potato and cheddar.



There are recipes online, but this one is our family’s recipe. It took us awhile to perfect.
We need @Roosh to share his pizza recipe and method on this thread (please!)
 

theodora

Chicken
Woman
Chicken Posole / Veggie Soup Recipe (cheap and good!)

While the original recipe is from William Sonoma and uses an Instant pot, I've done this on the stove and it turns out wonderfully. Can be modified to your liking and made with or without meat... The veggie version (which is the recipe below) is honestly pretty darn good too. Over time, I combined the posole recipe with a veggie soup recipe inspired by something I was served during a fasting period at someone's house. Too good to be "fasting" food! Anyway, I like this recipe because it is super cheap, serves many, gets better as it sits in the fridge for leftovers, and you can be creative and modify it to your tastes or with whatever ingredients you have on hand.

Ingredients
  • Veggie or chicken broth (2 quarts, or enough to cover the ingredients in the pot.) I haven't tried it but I'm sure bone broth would work as well, with a healthy amount of seasoning.
  • 1-2 white onions
  • Shredded / chopped collards or kale
  • 6-10 tomatillos (you must include these if you can find them!)
  • 2-4 cans of different kinds of beans, rinsed with water (Try kidney, great northern, or pinto.)
  • Lots of seasoning (cumin is essential, also salt and pepper and a couple of bay leaves if you have them.) Be easy on the salt and taste often to make sure you don't have too much salt with the already-salty chicken broth. If you're like me, throw in whatever you think would taste good.
  • 1-2 chopped jalapenos with the seeds, if you like a little spice! I find this soup is best with a little heat to it that warms your body.
  • Cholula hot sauce, to your preference
  • Olive oil
  • Shredded chicken (optional). Either cook it in the crock pot and shred yourself, or go to the freezer isle and buy some of the pre-cooked and shredded chicken. The important thing is that it's cooked already.
  • Shredded cheese for topping. I like the mix of white and orange cheeses (Mexican blend?)
Method
  1. Get your pot nice and hot with some olive oil, chop your onion. Add onion to the pot and sauté until translucent.
  2. Add literally everything else, in this order roughly:
    1. Broth
    2. Chicken
    3. Onions, tomatillos
    4. Collards or kale (I recommend collards)
    5. Beans, but rinse them of all that gooey can residue first! If you don't, your soup will have a gross color.
    6. Jalapenos
    7. Seasonings, hot sauce
    8. Bay leaf
  3. Bring to boil
  4. Once boiling, cover and simmer for as long as possible. 40 min minimum, 60-80 minutes is a good target if you're simmering on low. When I did it in 40 minutes I was in a rush and was "simmering" it on medium-high heat. The cooking time is important to make the collards tender and bring out the flavor of everything. This recipe isn't nearly as good rushed.
  5. Stir often and taste. Add more seasoning if needed.
  6. Serve, topped with cheese.
Let me know if you have any questions. I know some will find the haphazardness of this recipe amusing. :)

Enjoy!
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Oh gosh, bacon never occurred to me! This is a game changer. Looking forward to breakfast this weekend...
I reconfirmed with my husband on how he made it. So originally we tried it with single thin layers and it wasn't great because it was a cheap brand, so we tried doubling up and it was perfect! If you use thicker cut bacon then one slice is probably fine. About 7 minutes on one side then flip it and 5 minutes on the other side. Hope you enjoy it!
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Oh wow, that's great! I've never tried cardoons but they look good. I hope it's a good recipe :)

Not sure if anyone cares about updates to my hunt for cardoons, but this is the only place I have to share that I found some!

I had called around to a few Italian and produce specialty shops to see if anyone had them or could special order them through their suppliers. They were all very kind and looked into it, but were ultimately not able to source them for me. I had just about given up and was doing some regular shopping at my local Wegmans today, when I reached for some scallions and then spotted bunches of cardoons right next to them!! I couldn’t believe that I searched all over town and there they were in my grocery store that I frequent every week. Lol

Anyway, I had to laugh at myself and share my success. This weekend I will experiment with them and post pictures and a recipe if it goes well!
 

Camellia

Pigeon
Woman
Not sure if anyone cares about updates to my hunt for cardoons, but this is the only place I have to share that I found some!

I had called around to a few Italian and produce specialty shops to see if anyone had them or could special order them through their suppliers. They were all very kind and looked into it, but were ultimately not able to source them for me. I had just about given up and was doing some regular shopping at my local Wegmans today, when I reached for some scallions and then spotted bunches of cardoons right next to them!! I couldn’t believe that I searched all over town and there they were in my grocery store that I frequent every week. Lol

Anyway, I had to laugh at myself and share my success. This weekend I will experiment with them and post pictures and a recipe if it goes well!
Lol that's funny! It was definitely meant to be. Now I *need* to try them but there's no Wegmans in my area yes, please share pictures!
 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
Not sure if anyone cares about updates to my hunt for cardoons, but this is the only place I have to share that I found some!

I had called around to a few Italian and produce specialty shops to see if anyone had them or could special order them through their suppliers. They were all very kind and looked into it, but were ultimately not able to source them for me. I had just about given up and was doing some regular shopping at my local Wegmans today, when I reached for some scallions and then spotted bunches of cardoons right next to them!! I couldn’t believe that I searched all over town and there they were in my grocery store that I frequent every week. Lol

Anyway, I had to laugh at myself and share my success. This weekend I will experiment with them and post pictures and a recipe if it goes well!

Cardoons are also known as artichoke thistles. They're invasive weeds. I grew up in Southern California, those things are all over the place out there; I remember that in extreme cases when heavy pesticide applications weren't good enough some of the regional parks would resort to controlled burns.

My mom's side of the family is Italian so I grew up with stories about her eating things like that, dandelions, beef brains, chicken blood risotto, etc. She would also eat garden snails growing up. Apparently common American garden snails are the descendants of culinary snails brought to the US by European settlers. She and her siblings would catch a bunch of garden snails and drop them in a bucket with a layer of corn meal on the bottom which is supposed to help clear toxins out of their systems (this might be folklore, I don't know how true it is). After a day of feeding on corn meal they would get cooked in wine and stirred into pasta. Its cheap protein if you've got a big Catholic family.
 
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