Recipes

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Ladies, I found something that is somewhat of a game changer for me. Crock pot manicotti. You prepare and fill uncooked shells and cook them entirely in the crock pot. It’s much easier and takes less time than trying to stuff boiled soft and floppy macaroni to bake in an oven.
Tbh, it’s still pretty time intensive, but I had these bad boys done in under 2 hours (30 mins prep), regardless what the recipe says.
 

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Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Idk why the image turned out sideways! I’m bad at mobile forum format. I probably should use image hosting sites, but I’d probably be bad at that too!
 

MBell

Sparrow
Woman
I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions for recipes to make on Valentine's Day with my young relatives? I offered to babysit for my cousins so they could have some time alone for Valentine's Day, and they have a son and daughter who are early school-aged. They like to help in the kitchen so I was trying to come up with some simple ideas that would be fun for them to make and then eat. Your recommendations are appreciated. Thanks!
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions for recipes to make on Valentine's Day with my young relatives? I offered to babysit for my cousins so they could have some time alone for Valentine's Day, and they have a son and daughter who are early school-aged. They like to help in the kitchen so I was trying to come up with some simple ideas that would be fun for them to make and then eat. Your recommendations are appreciated. Thanks!

Bakeless cookies are popular. You melt chocolate, mix stuff in, drop onto a sheet to dry, then enjoy.
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions for recipes to make on Valentine's Day with my young relatives? I offered to babysit for my cousins so they could have some time alone for Valentine's Day, and they have a son and daughter who are early school-aged. They like to help in the kitchen so I was trying to come up with some simple ideas that would be fun for them to make and then eat. Your recommendations are appreciated. Thanks!
You could also try sugar cookies and decorate with red, white and pink frosting and/or sprinkles. I've also made a sheet of brownies and used heart cookie cutters and decorated them too. As far as dinner ideas, if they aren't afraid of getting dirty maybe try something like meatloaf...i always liked mixing all the ingredients with my hands when I was little. Or focus on red foods for valentine's day.
 

SchoolApple

Sparrow
Woman
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions for recipes to make on Valentine's Day with my young relatives? I offered to babysit for my cousins so they could have some time alone for Valentine's Day, and they have a son and daughter who are early school-aged. They like to help in the kitchen so I was trying to come up with some simple ideas that would be fun for them to make and then eat. Your recommendations are appreciated. Thanks!


I received a wonderful cookbook for Christmas where every recipe can be done either fast in the Instant Pot or slow in a Crock Pot.

This chili Mac and cheese seems like a fun and easy one-pot meal. Not sure if little kids would like the olives but you could leave them out. I plan on making this myself with just a hint of the chili powder.
 

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MBell

Sparrow
Woman
Thanks for your suggestions! I really appreciate it, and I will definitely have to try all of your suggestions (either for me or for a fun activity when I am babysitting)! : )
 

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
Valentine's Day sugar cookie recipe- I've used this one and it's great for rolling and doing cutouts. I personally don't add frosting to my own family's cookies and it has the right amount of sweetness with the amount of sugar. The recipe makes about 60 so we make sure to share with friends! I also enjoy that it's just a recipe and not the blogger's life story that you have to dig deep to find the directions :laughter:

 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions for recipes to make on Valentine's Day with my young relatives? I offered to babysit for my cousins so they could have some time alone for Valentine's Day, and they have a son and daughter who are early school-aged. They like to help in the kitchen so I was trying to come up with some simple ideas that would be fun for them to make and then eat. Your recommendations are appreciated. Thanks!
I was just thinking, it might be fun to have them help you make some homemade play dough. It’s super easy and the kids could easily help. You could dye the dough Valentine’s colors and have them make little sculptures or hearts using cookie cutters as gifts for their parents. After they make their creations, stick them on a baking sheet and let them harden in the oven at 200 degrees for about 5-10 minutes until they’re dry.
 
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Goldilocks

Chicken
Woman
I received an Instant Pot for my birthday this year. I’m still learning about it and used it for some simple recipes so far. It was great for mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving. I just finished a pot roast for tonight’s dinner that is incredibly juicy, meat falling apart just right, and a nice gravy for the potatoes and veggies. Those of you with an Instant Pot, what do you think of it? Do you have favorite recipes?
I'm a little late here, but I love my instant pot! It's a total game changer. To help me learn how to use it I downloaded the app. It has a bunch of recipes and it tells you exactly what buttons to press, how long to cook for, to use instant release or natural release, etc. I also got these fridge magnets that have the cook times for different types of foods (and also what pressure setting). Now I can make pretty much anything with it. Highly recommend it. But wait for when it goes on sale, it happens a few times a year. Even if you pay full price I still think its worth it.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
I'm a little late here, but I love my instant pot! It's a total game changer. To help me learn how to use it I downloaded the app.

I’ve gotten to know it a little better and the app is definitely a big help. It’s basically like Instant Pot for Dummies! I love that I can set the preheat or cook times and leave the room and the app will notify my phone so that I can do another activity elsewhere and then know when I need to go downstairs for the next step.

I also got this awesome book for Christmas that has gorgeous recipes for fast and slow cookers.
Can’t wait to work my way through it.
 

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Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
My little brother and his girlfriend have an instant pot and it's pretty cool in terms of what it can do! Although I'm not ashamed to say I am afraid of pressure cookers. I was really impressed by how perfectly it will soft-boil eggs. But they have the BIG one and it can still only do 4-6 eggs at a time. I feel the same way about my crockpot most of the time. Even when I had the HUGE one, I was always grumbling at it like "I could fit four times this in a big stock pot in the oven..."

I am spoiled on commercial kitchens. Speaking of which - I wanna share my bakery recipes, but will go through and scale them down a bit before posting them here because most people don't have a 10qt stand mixer (including me, at this point).

But I wanted to throw out there that I am more than happy to share the small-scale-commercial recipes and guidelines, too. I've always kind of had it in my head that someday I'll put together a little tutorial series on how to run a small (one-person) bakery, with all the recipes and techniques and systems and so forth that I used, because it was a pretty beautiful little operation while it lasted, if I may say so meself (it was quite profitable; I hung up my apron to stay home with my kids). But I want to gauge for interest in that before I start sinking time into putting it together. So if anyone is interested, send me a message! I can't say how long it will take, but I promise the eventual cost of the "program" will be exactly $0 because money is a steaming pile of poo:poo: to me and my ideas are free.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
BLUEBERRY CAKE:
Box Duncan Hines Butter Cake Mix
12 oz Cool Whip
8 oz cream cheese
1/2 cup sugar
2 cups confectioners sugar
1 can blueberry pie filling
Mix and bake cake per directions on box
(Recipe calls for 3 layers, but I do two)
In large bowl mix soft cream cheese and both sugars. Cream good, then
whip in the Cool Whip. Beat on high speed about 2 min
Frost cake and in between layers put blueberry mixture on layer in center.
 

MBell

Sparrow
Woman
I wanted to share a recipe that I actually made today. My great-aunt used to visit my family when we were younger and bring us her homemade cinnamon raisin bread. I never got her recipe, and she passed many years ago. I have been experimenting with different recipes to try and find one that would replicate her amazing bread. The recipe in the link below is the closest guide I have found that reproduces the the taste of her bread.


It is so darn good with butter or peanut butter!
 

stugatz

Pelican
NOTE: These have gone over big at every single Catholic young adult gathering I've brought them to. They're not outright challenging, but have a learning curve, as they're bound with golden syrup instead of eggs.

Apologies if this recipe is long - I edit my recipes obsessively, as I like giving them out to people, so I try to be as detailed as possible with directions.

ANZAC Biscuits

*see note on bottom

1 cup all purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 cup rolled oats*
1 cup unsweetened coconut flakes*

1 stick butter
2 tablespoons golden syrup*
2 tablespoons boiling water
1 teaspoon baking soda


Preheat oven to 350.

Mix flour, sugar, oats, and coconut together - set aside.

In a small saucepan over low heat, melt the syrup and butter together until they are fully incorporated. In a separate container, mix the soda and the boiling water well, and mix into the melted butter and syrup while it is still on the burner. It froths up very aggressively - watch out.

Add the frothy butter mixture to the dry ingredients - mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon, so the mixture saturates all of the dry ingredients. You may need to use your hands toward the end to make sure everything is covered. Roll into roughly golf ball-sized portions and place on cookie sheets lined with greased aluminum foil.

Bake at 350 for 10 to 12 minutes, until a deep golden brown. If baked on the long end, these get slightly crunchy – if baked on the lower end, they have a bit of a chew to them.

Be very careful when removing these from the cookie sheet, as the ambient heat turns the golden syrup into molten caramel, and makes these extremely soft to handle. Let them cool on the cookie sheet until they've hardened quite a bit, then peel them off of the foil and finish them off on a cooling rack.

If doubling or tripling your batch, I like to move the cookies (foil and all) onto a kitchen table or counter to let them finish cooling off on top of the foil.

YIELD: 14 cookies

*Rolled Oats - Use traditional rolled oats - don't use the quick-cooking variety.

*Unsweetened coconut flakes - The original recipe uses something called desiccated coconut, which is a chore to find in the United States unless you're resorting to mail order. It has the consistency of coarse sand. If you don't want to do the legwork to get your hands on a bag, I would recommend chopping up regular unsweetened coconut flakes until they take on a similar consistency - I have done this for a few years with no problems.

*Golden Syrup - This CANNOT be substituted. Golden syrup (also called light treacle) is a British product that looks like honey, but is more viscous - it's a boiled and caramelized sugar syrup. I have found it at grocery stores with no major issue, but you usually have to go to the ethnic foods section. If you can't find it, look at a higher-end grocery store, or mail-order it.

You can make golden syrup at home - I have done it myself - but it takes a lot of effort, and you have to have a knack for candy-making. When I make a batch at home, though, it still doesn't have the trademark buttery smooth taste Lyle's does.
 
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Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
NOTE: These have gone over big at every single Catholic young adult gathering I've brought them to. They're not outright challenging, but have a learning curve, as they're bound with golden syrup instead of eggs.

Apologies if this recipe is long - I edit my recipes obsessively, as I like giving them out to people, so I try to be as detailed as possible with directions.

ANZAC Biscuits

*see note on bottom

1 cup all purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 cup rolled oats*
1 cup unsweetened coconut flakes*

1 stick butter
2 tablespoons golden syrup*
2 tablespoons boiling water
1 teaspoon baking soda


Preheat oven to 350.

Mix flour, sugar, oats, and coconut together - set aside.

In a small saucepan over low heat, melt the syrup and butter together until they are fully incorporated. In a separate container, mix the soda and the boiling water well, and mix into the melted butter and syrup while it is still on the burner. It froths up very aggressively - watch out.

Add the frothy butter mixture to the dry ingredients - mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon, so the mixture saturates all of the dry ingredients. You may need to use your hands toward the end to make sure everything is covered. Roll into roughly golf ball-sized portions and place on cookie sheets lined with greased aluminum foil.

Bake at 350 for 10 to 12 minutes, until a deep golden brown. If baked on the long end, these get slightly crunchy – if baked on the lower end, they have a bit of a chew to them.

Be very careful when removing these from the cookie sheet, as the ambient heat turns the golden syrup into molten caramel, and makes these extremely soft to handle. Let them cool on the cookie sheet until they've hardened quite a bit, then peel them off of the foil and finish them off on a cooling rack.

If doubling or tripling your batch, I like to move the cookies (foil and all) onto a kitchen table or counter to let them finish cooling off on top of the foil.

YIELD: 14 cookies

*Rolled Oats - Use traditional rolled oats - don't use the quick-cooking variety.

*Unsweetened coconut flakes - The original recipe uses something called desiccated coconut, which is a chore to find in the United States unless you're resorting to mail order. It has the consistency of coarse sand. If you don't want to do the legwork to get your hands on a bag, I would recommend chopping up regular unsweetened coconut flakes until they take on a similar consistency - I have done this for a few years with no problems.

*Golden Syrup - This CANNOT be substituted. Golden syrup (also called light treacle) is a British product that looks like honey, but is more viscous - it's a boiled and caramelized sugar syrup. I have found it at grocery stores with no major issue, but you usually have to go to the ethnic foods section. If you can't find it, look at a higher-end grocery store, or mail-order it.

You can make golden syrup at home - I have done it myself - but it takes a lot of effort, and you have to have a knack for candy-making. When I make a batch at home, though, it still doesn't have the trademark buttery smooth taste Lyle's does.
I want to try these! My Aussie friends talk these up but never made them for me
 

stugatz

Pelican
I want to try these! My Aussie friends talk these up but never made them for me
These and lamingtons (sponge cake covered in chocolate frosting and rolled in unsweetened coconut) are the only two Aussie desserts I have.

(I got these recipes when I went to Outback with a friend, and got annoyed that I didn’t know what they really eat down there. I actually don’t know what else they eat other than these desserts.)
 
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