Recipes

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Oh, balut is vile - I'd forgotten all about that one before you mentioned it, ugh.

The one time I did try foie gras was when I lived in Chicago. A local hot dog vendor (since closed) had a ridiculous flagship item on his menu - a duck sausage served in a brioche bun, topped with foie gras and served with french fries deep fried in duck fat. It was so nuts I had to try it just one time - what I mainly remember about the foie gras was the silky smooth texture.

Sure, feel free to post the recipe - I have no problem with hoarding recipes, they're digital.

Welp, I just looked up both ortolan bunting and balut, and I must say I’m quite done with the internet for today.
 

stugatz

Pelican
Going to steer this back onto a tamer subject - my toffee recipe from the other night. I made a batch a few nights back and ended up singing the first one, ruining it. The second one I did a lot more carefully and still low-key singed this one, too - but barely. Thankfully, it was just on the bottom and toward the end, so almost everything I poured out the pot was untainted.

My current apartment has one of those ceramic electric stoves - I've been spoiled by gas and how you can switch the heat intensity on a dime. Not so with electric - once it's hot, it's very hard to take the heat away when you notice you've gone too far.

If you do make the toffee on an electric stove, stir more constantly instead of occasionally like I suggested - and have a candy thermometer sitting in the batter so that you can constantly monitor the temperature. (I'd suggest one that has a bottom to it, so the thermometer itself doesn't make contact with the pot - pictured below. The cheaper ones have a clip that awkwardly balance the thermometer in the boiling sugar, which doesn't work well if you have to stir - and half the time it slips and falls in anyway.)

61rxAg5uIOL.jpgI have an instant-read (a knockoff of a Thermapen) that does the job OK enough, but it gets to the correct temperature within five seconds of dipping it in - which is far, far too slow for something high stakes like this. If you're closing in on 300 degrees and pause to take the candy's temperature again, five seconds can result in a singed batch. The temperature rises much faster the hotter the mix gets.
 
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Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
A better candy thermometer has been on my list of things to buy for a while now. I have two of the cheap glass ones that clip on. I use a pot with a good lip on it and I don't have to worry about them popping off or falling in, but EVERY time I make candy, I say to myself "this is probably the time I'm gonna break it and get glass in my candy..." :laughter:

So far I haven't done that yet! But I feel like it's only a matter of time.
 

stugatz

Pelican
This is similar to the last candy thermometer that I owned, before I got my instant read. It's not fun to use.

View attachment 29385

The design isn't very good. The clip holds the thermometer to the side of the oven just fine, but it tends to slip down through the opening and touch the pot, especially if you're stirring while boiling. (The rotating head also wears out quickly and you have to keep lifting it up to read it.) I eventually gave up and just used it like a regular thermometer.

Your glass clip-ons are probably just fine, the one I am looking at is designed to go to 400 anyway.
 

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Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Thought I’d share some actual 60’s era vintage appetizers for fun :)

1) Pickles wrapped in salami:
Take a piece of pre-sliced salami, schmear it with about 2 tsp to 1 tbsp of cream cheese (depending on how much you like), then place a slice of pickle in the middle. The pickle slice shouldn’t be much wider than 1/3 inch and about the length or a little longer of the salami. Roll it up and secure it with a festive toothpick. Make plenty because they’re really yummy!

2) Deep-fried ravioli
Deep fry or skillet fry fresh cheese ravioli (unboiled) and then serve with marinara sauce for dipping

3) Crackers with peanut butter and horseradish
Take a Ritz cracker and schmear it with a bit of smooth peanut butter. On top of the peanut butter, spread a small amount of horseradish (about a bean sized amount, maybe more depending on the strength of the horseradish). Interesting side-story, my dad actually had these as part of his last civilian meal before heading down to Pensacola and then off to Vietnam in ‘69.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
Welp, I just looked up both ortolan bunting and balut, and I must say I’m quite done with the internet for today.

No, no. You guys aren't talking balut without me...

You haven't lived until you've had balut malawig and shoyu. Malawig means "long time" so that little duck is ready to hatch when they boil it. Then you inject shoyu and re-boil it before you eat it warm a few days later. Savages over there.

Aloha!
 

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
This is an old recipe from a newspaper clipping.
This past Autumn we boiled, pureed, and seasoned, and froze pie pumpkins – 2 cups per freezer bag.

I added the chopped pecans to the mix, and powdered sugar on the top once the bread cooled down.
The pumpkin puree is seasoned, but I still use the below season in the flour mix.
The end product is eaten within two days in the home.

Pumpkin Bread
Preheat oven to 325

In a mixing bowl whisk together:
  • 2 cups of (organic) flour
  • ½ teaspoon of salt (we use Himalayan salt)
  • 1 teaspoon of baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg

In another mixing bowl blend at medium speed together:
  • 1 1/1 (stick ¾ cups) soft butter
    • Note: you can use a ratio of 1:1 with applesauce. I have never tried it.
  • (6 tablespoons of butter to 6 tablespoons applesauce
  • 2 cups of sugar
    • Note: I use 1 ½ cups due to the seasoned pumpkin puree used – still sweet
  • Add one at time 2 (brown) eggs
  • Beat in the 2 cups of pumpkin puree into the mix
  • Add the above flour mixture
  • Optional: add 1 cup of chopped pecans into mix

We bake in an 8 x 8 ceramic dish for about 75 minutes – checking with a toothpick.
Better to be on the try side than too moist.

10 minutes to cool – add powdered sugar.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Not sure if anyone cares about updates to my hunt for cardoons, but this is the only place I have to share that I found some!

I had called around to a few Italian and produce specialty shops to see if anyone had them or could special order them through their suppliers. They were all very kind and looked into it, but were ultimately not able to source them for me. I had just about given up and was doing some regular shopping at my local Wegmans today, when I reached for some scallions and then spotted bunches of cardoons right next to them!! I couldn’t believe that I searched all over town and there they were in my grocery store that I frequent every week. Lol

Anyway, I had to laugh at myself and share my success. This weekend I will experiment with them and post pictures and a recipe if it goes well!
Update to my fried cardoon adventure: back in January, I cleaned, blanched and froze the stalks that I bought (cut into 2” pieces). This week I thawed them to fry up for Easter with the extended family tomorrow.
I’ve never made these before and when my grandpa used to do them, he would coat them in an egg/flour mixture and fry.
I did the same except my frying was done in the air fryer at 350F for 10 minutes per batch, flipping halfway through. I don’t think they are as tasty as the fried in oil way, but I’m looking forward to bringing these to my parents and my brother, since we enjoyed them so much when my grandpa was alive.
It’s something I’ve been wanting to make for years, and I’m glad I finally did. I hope the fam enjoys them tomorrow!
 

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Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Is anyone making anything special for Easter? My husband is going to grill a couple racks of lamb and asparagus, I’m going to make roasted artichokes, and my mom is bringing over roasted red potatoes with rosemary. We also got a really good garlic bread loaf from the bakery for filler. Strawberry shortcake for dessert!

My roasted artichoke recipe:
Prepare the artichokes-
Using a serrated knife, cut off the top inch of the artichoke and the stem right next to the base. With a pair of kitchen scissors, clip all the spikes off the tips of the leaves. After that, cut the artichoke completely in half and cut through the bottom right underneath the “choke,” use a spoon to scoop out the fuzz and then scrape the seeds out. Rinse really well. Be sure to remove all the fuzz! Repeat for each artichoke.

Roasting Instructions-
Set oven to 400F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and drizzle with bit of olive oil. Place the artichokes cut side down on the baking sheet. Drizzle artichokes with more olive oil. Sprinkle them with a bit of salt, garlic powder, and red pepper flakes. Bake the artichokes, uncovered, for about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and cover tightly with more foil. Bake for 25-35 minutes, or until the leaves pull off easily.

Serve with garlic Mayo aioli:
Garlic Mayo aioli-
Combine equal parts mayonnaise, olive oil, raw peeled garlic, and a pinch of salt to taste and little fresh lemon juice. Blend well together in a food processor. Add more garlic if you want. Let sit in the fridge for at least 30 minutes before serving.
 
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Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
I made a ‘smash burgers’ recipe last night for the first time. Followed the Chef Kenji YouTube video below. The family really enjoyed them.

Served with steamed peas and Mediterranean potato wedges.

 

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Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Last week on Easter, my mom served a roast turkey breast that was to die for. Just melt in your mouth. I got the recipe from her and i currently have it in the oven for tonight’s Sunday dinner.

Fresh (never frozen turkey breast)- mine is a split, about 2 lbs.
Pat dry, coat with butter/oil/cooking spray (optional), and season with poultry seasoning- I used Mrs. Dash original.
Place in roasting pan.
450F for 15 mins to sear.
Add chicken broth 1 cup. I used Herbox powdered chicken bouillon- 2 tsp w/ w cups hot water.
350F for 25 mins per pound.
Baste as needed.

Cook until internal temp is 165F at thickest part of breast.
Rest 15 mins before slicing.

I usually make gravy from the drippings, but because this isn’t a full bird and I have a lot to do today, I’m using a bottle of McCormick bottled turkey gravy to serve.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I made this today based on what I remember of a recipe my grandmother made. Delicious! You can do a smaller version, but it still only came to $4 per person considering how many meals we are getting.

Shrimp Boats
3 lbs small frozen shrimp
2 packages frozen garlic bread loaves. Garlic Texas toast would work too.
Old Bay seasoning
mayo
green onions, 2 bunches
Swiss cheese or whatever you like

Thaw garlic bread for about 20 minutes, enough to pry open the loaves. Heat oven to 350 while you thaw the shrimp in a warm pan in some butter. This pretty much cooks the shrimp. Slice onions about halfway up the green parts and toss in with shrimp. Once shrimp are thawed and cooked drain and mix with about a cup of Mayo. Spread along garlic loaves, top with sliced cheese, and sprinkle with Old Bay. Pop in oven till bread is browned and cheese melted.
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Anyone have a recipe for liver that really disguises the liver flavor? For example, I'm wondering if I mixed 70%beef and 30%liver together with a bunch of spices would it mask the livery taste? Liver is so healthy and I would like to incorporate it into my diet occasionally but I can't get past the taste.
 
Anyone have a recipe for liver that really disguises the liver flavor? For example, I'm wondering if I mixed 70%beef and 30%liver together with a bunch of spices would it mask the livery taste? Liver is so healthy and I would like to incorporate it into my diet occasionally but I can't get past the taste.
Because liver has a pretty dominant taste, I do not think you can get the taste of it out completely. The people from Berlin, though, have this delicious recipe, where they serve liver with apples and onions. It takes away that iron taste.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Anyone have a recipe for liver that really disguises the liver flavor? For example, I'm wondering if I mixed 70%beef and 30%liver together with a bunch of spices would it mask the livery taste? Liver is so healthy and I would like to incorporate it into my diet occasionally but I can't get past the taste.
Soaking the liver in milk can help with the metallic taste. Also, chicken liver has a much more mild flavor (though it isn’t quite as nutrient dense as beef liver) and is really good as a pate.
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Soaking the liver in milk can help with the metallic taste. Also, chicken liver has a much more mild flavor (though it isn’t quite as nutrient dense as beef liver) and is really good as a pate.
Funny aside about pate. My friend's mom is French and I've enjoyed her various pates. However, I cannot look at the pate prior to eating it because it makes me think of wet cat/dog food and I get nauseous :vomit: :laughter: If I don't look at it, it's so delicious!
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Funny aside about pate. My friend's mom is French and I've enjoyed her various pates. However, I cannot look at the pate prior to eating it because it makes me think of wet cat/dog food and I get nauseous :vomit: :laughter: If I don't look at it, it's so delicious!
Fancy Feast single-handedly ruined pate for so many people lol :laughter:
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Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I made this the other day and it was really good. Like Mrs. DanielH, I’m always trying ways to incorporate superfoods into our regular diet. Mushrooms are an amazing food. They’re like taking a multi-vitamin (kind of) but as food. They have the best plant source of vitamin D (imo) plus a bunch of other nutrients.

Ingredients
1 pound baby belles cleaned and cut into quarters (I pop the stems off but keep them on if you like)
1/4 cup Panko
3 garlic cloves crushed/minced
About 2 tbsp Olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Heat oven to 425 F. Prepare a baking sheet with oil or non-stick spray. Toss all the ingredients in a bowl so everything is well coated. Dump contents onto the baking sheet in a single layer. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 20 minutes tossing occasionally. Add an additional 5 minutes until Panko is golden and crispy.

This is so yummy. It almost tastes like crispy red potatoes with garlic. Very good keto substitute.
 
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Shedlight11

Pigeon
Woman
Hello ladies,

Not sure if there is already a recipes thread, but I figured I would make one.

I love to cook and bake. I have a lot of allergies, so I try to make meals that are healthy, but still taste good. I refrain from using processed ingredients and what not. I believe the man-made chemicals in our food are a contribution as to why were seeing many infertility issues, gut issues, mental illness, lack of faith and so on.

All of my recipes are vegan, gluten-free, corn-free, soy-free & refined-sugar free. No, I am not a feminist hippie leftist with blue hair haha. Just value clean ingredients and they help keep my allergies/intolerances basically non-existent.

Regardless of what you cook and your ingredients, I would love to see all different kinds of recipes here, whether they are healthy or not. I think it serves as great inspiration and is a great way to learn from one another.

Would love to see what you ladies are stirring up in your kitchens.

God Bless!

Here's something I made today!
 

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