Red Pill Movies

puckerman

Ostrich
I want to second the vote for Abbott and Costello Go To Mars. It's their typical zaniness, and it's definitely politically incorrect. It definitely would not be made today.

[video=dailymotion]http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xw....ytimg.com/vi/5an-EDaw81Q/hqdefault.jpg[/img]
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I have posted on the main movie thread for awhile. I did not know that there was a red pill movie thread until a week ago, when Cobra posted a link in the main movie thread. Here is my first suggestion for a classic red pill movie.

"Hard Times" stars Charles Bronson as a hard-slugging drifter who competes in illegal bare-knuckled boxing matches during the Great Depression after forming a partnership with the fast-talking hustler Speed, played by James Coburn. I especially like the ending, where the professional fighter brought in as a ringer refuses to cheat out of a sense of pride and fair-play. In the trailer, Bronson correctly shows how to bitch slap someone with a gun -- with the barrel, not with the butt end (as incorrectly shown in almost every instance in every movie ever made).



I have not yet gone through this thread, but I agree 100% with Clint Eastwood in "High Plains Drifter." I must have seen that movie a dozen times. Clint also directed that movie, showing the skills that would make him a truly great director in the future. BTW: That movie is actually a ghost story in a western setting, which Clint reprised years later in "Pale Rider," another red pill movie.

 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
Tail Gunner said:
I have not yet gone through this thread, but I agree 100% with Clint Eastwood in "High Plains Drifter." I must have seen that movie a dozen times. Clint also directed that movie, showing the skills that would make him a truly great director in the future. BTW: That movie is actually a ghost story in a western setting, which Clint reprised years later in "Pale Rider," another red pill movie.

I've never actually seen High Plains Drifter, but I've seen Pale Rider about as many times as you've seen Drifter - it's one of my favourite Westerns.

Not sure if "Pale Rider" is precisely a ghost story as such - given Clint bangs Hull's fiancee you'd conclude he was a mortal man - but I do like the idea he was some sort of revenant sent by God to answer the girl's prayers, brought back from the dead as it were. Or that he'd been brought back from the dead without realising at all what his purpose was.

Either way it's a great little film. "You shouldn't play with matches."
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Paracelsus said:
Not sure if "Pale Rider" is precisely a ghost story as such - given Clint bangs Hull's fiancee you'd conclude he was a mortal man - but I do like the idea he was some sort of revenant sent by God to answer the girl's prayers, brought back from the dead as it were. Or that he'd been brought back from the dead without realising at all what his purpose was.

Either way it's a great little film. "You shouldn't play with matches."
Yes, "Pale Rider" is far more vague than "High Plains Drifter" regarding whether he or not he is a ghost. You simply see the scars of his bullet-riddled body, showing a level of violence that not many men could have survived. I have always viewed "Pale Rider" as a combination of "Shane," arguably the most classic Western film of all time, combined with the story of the ghostly vengeance in "High Plains Drifter."

Shane, which earned six Academy Awards, is also very red pill. When the heroine complains of all the guns in the valley, Shane replies: "A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it." The movie was made back when common sense still prevailed in American culture and before the communist and SJW infiltration of Hollywood. Jack Palance, a former boxer, played a very dangerous and evil-looking bad guy.

 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
This is an extremely red pill movie based on a true event that almost no one knows about. "The Battle of Athens (sometimes called the McMinn County War) was a rebellion led by citizens in Athens and Etowah, Tennessee, United States, against the local government in August 1946. The citizens, including some World War II veterans, accused the local officials of predatory policing, police brutality, political corruption and voter intimidation."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Athens_(1946)

During WWII, two service men on leave were shot and killed by members of the local corrupt political machine. The servicemen abroad heard what was going on and were anxious to get home and do something about it. McMinn County had around 3,000 returning military veterans, constituting almost 10 percent of the county population. The veterans figured that if democracy was good enough for the Germans and the Japanese, then it was good enough for McMinn County, too. This culminated in a rebellion and a giant firefight between the GIs and the corrupt local police force and their lackeys. Guess who won.

The 1992 made-for-television movie "An American Story" (produced by the Hallmark Hall of Fame) was loosely based upon the McMinn County War but set in a Texas town in 1945. It was nominated for two 1993 prime time Emmy Awards and one American Society of Cinematographers award. The battle is also mentioned in the novel "Unintended Consequences" and in the movie "Shooter." [Shooter is another great red pill movie.]

 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I watched "Sicario" for the second time last week. I was just as impressed with the film as I remembered. It starts out looking blue pill, with a lead female character who is the head of an FBI Critical Incident Response Group. But then it turns red pill as hell when she is outmaneuvered, outgunned, and rescued by almost every male in the movie. She is like a retarded rodeo clown in the midst of U.S. Marshals, Texas Rangers, DEA agents, CIA operatives, and even a U.S. Army Delta Force unit.

Another major red pill element is how the Benicio del Toro character is relentless in his pursuit of justice (the SJW brigade would call it revenge) for his slain family.

 

Super_Fire

Kingfisher
Tail Gunner said:
The movie was made back when common sense still prevailed in American culture and before the communist and SJW infiltration of Hollywood.
That actually began with the birth of Hollywood itself. Thomas Edison's lab in New Jersey created the motion picture camera and wanted any filmmaker who used it to pay him royalties. Jewish movie producers on the East Coast didn't like this and tried to get around it, leading Edison and others to create the Edison Trust, a protective association that would sue NY Jews who were filming without paying royalties.

They tried filming in Europe, but eventually moved to Hollywood, California to get away from the Trust. Full article on that issue here:

http://hugequestions.com/Eric/TFC/Edison-and-the-Jews.html

Starting in the early 1920s, after risque subjects in films and Hollywood sex scandals, pressure mounted for Hollywood to be censored on moral grounds, with legislators filing almost 100 movie censorship bills in 1921. Hollywood wouldn't survive, so it chose self-censorship. In 1929, a Catholic layman and Jesuit priest wrote the first production code and submitted to the studios. The Hollywood Production Code was finalized and put into place in 1930. After that, the Catholic Legion of Decency would inspect the content of each Hollywood film, until Hollywood broke the code in 1965 with The Pawnbroker, a Holocaust movie that was beyond criticism (Spielberg did something similar when the TV code was broken to air Schindler's List unedited on network TV). But you're right in that Shane was released during the Production Code era.
 

Kurgan

Kingfisher
I always thought the Rampage films Uwe Boll did were pretty red-pill for the fact the main character sees how the wealthy elite abuse people and decided to go postal to prove his point. I saw the first 2 on Netflix but the third one didn't seem to come yet as it involved him killing the President.
 

Kaligula

Woodpecker
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_U1Gupe6iY
Shogun, of course. There are two basic ways to watch it:

1) Red Pill story: Blackthorne is a young man in the need of education, Toranaga is a tutor.
2) Japanese worldview versus European worldview. There is the Japanese theme of Fate/submission to social order (see, for example, such masterpieces as Harakiri (1962), Gonza the Spearman) against Western theme “We shall overcome” (Blackthorne, who tries to escape, to save Mariko, to fight the Portuguese/Jesuits etc). This clash finds its perverse end when Toranaga, unknown to Blackthorne, at the end had his rebuilt ship burnt.

On the sideline there is a nice friendship storyline between Blackthorne and Rodrigues.

It is interesting that the Japanese social order is perceived by Blackthorne in an European, i.e.reformist way, as something that can and must be changed ...since barbarians need to be civilized. A sidenote to non-Europeans especially: the need of reforming is a general trait of European civilization, not restricted to overseas countries at all, but indulged relentlessly through different "better life" campaigns against different kinds of "internal barbarians", too. Coming from Poland, I will only notice that the rhetoric of “civilizing” was used quite often by Germans towards Poles, and, actually this paternalistic attitude can still be found quite often today, especially in the context of EU-Poland relationship.
Well, it would be interesting to see a Japanese view of European order, especially of the current one.
 
Chad Daring said:
I just got done watching Green Street Hooligans, and realized that its one of the few movies I've seen where the main character goes from beta, weak, and bitchy to becoming a tough ass alpha male and better for it. Its pretty well established that mainstream media is filled with these beta praising "good guys finish first" kinda movies, so I figured getting a good list of movies that show the opposite would be beneficial.

Also, movies that feature already Alpha main characters (James Bond is the best example) aren't what I'm talking about. I'm talking movies that clearly show the main character starting out weak and becoming stronger and getting what he wants because of it.

Green Street Hooligans
i just finished watching green street hooligans, thanks to your recommendation
that movie was fucking inspiring man. I loved the scene in the middle fo the movie after the boys finish the fight out in manchester

"you know the best part. it isn't knowing that your friends have your back. its knowing that you have your friends back... I'd never lived closer to danger...but i'd never felt safer..i'd never felt more confident....and people could spot it from a mile away....." I really identified with these lines.....
 
Just watched They Live. As a horror fanatic and lifelong John Carpenter fan, I cannot believe I somehow never saw this movie. It is based as fuck, entertaining, well-written and paced, stands the test of time, and while I won't comment on certain, previously postulated parallels to modern day politics (let's say)... Roddy Piper was the man.
 

questor70

Ostrich
Buddydowrongright2 said:
Just watched They Live.
Not to rain on people's parade but They Live was originally meant to be a critique of the Reagan era of consumerism and trickle-down economics. In other words, it's a conspiracy theory from a decidedly left-leaning foundation critical of right-wing thinking. I was one of the few who saw it when it came out and the subtext was as clear as a bell at the time. If people want to treat it more abstractly and apply it elsewhere, fine, but that wasn't the original intent. So to see it so popular with the alt-right seems really strange to me.

More on the phenomenon of it being coopted here.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
questor70 said:
Buddydowrongright2 said:
Just watched They Live.
Not to rain on people's parade but They Live was originally meant to be a critique of the Reagan era of consumerism and trickle-down economics. In other words, it's a conspiracy theory from a decidedly left-leaning foundation critical of right-wing thinking. I was one of the few who saw it when it came out and the subtext was as clear as a bell at the time. If people want to treat it more abstractly and apply it elsewhere, fine, but that wasn't the original intent. So to see it so popular with the alt-right seems really strange to me.

More on the phenomenon of it being coopted here.
You are entirely correct. Yet, "They Live" is still red pill as hell, because a man with very little power and who is simply "a cog in the machine" takes the initiative to discover mankind's enemy and tormentor (whoever that might be -- whether socialist or fascist, man or beast, human or alien) and consciously decides to give them the finger -- followed by a healthy ass-kicking. In other words, a man -- who society has erroneously classified as powerless -- decides to finally take action like a man (utilizing the power of his mind and his brawn), rather than simply lying down in the street like roadkill. Red pill as f_ck.

If John Carpenter is just another lib-tard socialist Hollyweird cuck, then he needs to learn the law of unintended consequences just like everyone else.
 
questor70 said:
Buddydowrongright2 said:
Just watched They Live.
Not to rain on people's parade but They Live was originally meant to be a critique of the Reagan era of consumerism and trickle-down economics. In other words, it's a conspiracy theory from a decidedly left-leaning foundation critical of right-wing thinking. I was one of the few who saw it when it came out and the subtext was as clear as a bell at the time. If people want to treat it more abstractly and apply it elsewhere, fine, but that wasn't the original intent. So to see it so popular with the alt-right seems really strange to me.

More on the phenomenon of it being coopted here.
I'm not alt-right.
 
Die Hard 4 specifically has the message that all the qualities that go into Bruce Willis's character are what makes him the hero, though not an easy guy to know. Not sure that's quite what we mean by "red pill."
 


Nicolas Ray's "In A Lonely Place"
This is a film I relate to a lot and is on record for being Bogarts most personal film. Most Film Noirs are inherently red pill, but IALP is special to me since it hits me where I live so hard. I know we've all had our anger stage when accepting the red pill, but if you're someone who's had a history of temper issues and violent reactions, and consequently had your relationships fail for said violent tendencies, this film will hit you hard. The ending is beautiful. Truly a poetic closer for doomed men, ruined by women and their own wounded egos, predestined to live the life of a single loner sipping whisky and cursing all the dames who ruined them, but still continuing on despite their bitterness.
 

mr-ed209

Sparrow
Not sure if it's been mentioned but There Will be Blood.

I remember watching it when it came out and it just felt like an brutal, intrinsically 'real' portrayal of what life would have been like during the start of America. The opening scene is like 10 or so minutes of near silence and an oil drill falling and killing one of the workers at the well - surrounded by nothing but desert.

The two main characters in the movie are completely non likeable and have no redeeming features. Daniel Day Lewis plays a peasant who strikes oil and manipulates all he can to earn his fortune. Paul Dano plays a dishonest preacher who lies about his ability to channel god and earn money for the 'church'. Its just a real accurate vision of machiavellianism.

Most of Paul Thomas Anderson's movies are pretty red pill it seems. Magnolia and Boogie Nights are quite blatant. Even his pseudo romantic comedy Punch Drunk Love was spot on the money at portraying Adam Sandler as an oppressed beta male, brought up in a house full of sisters etc.
 
Top