Red Pill Movies

Sp5

 
The Philadelphia Story

Three men around a bitch-goddess (Katherine Hepburn)

Alpha (Cary Grant)
Beta (John Howard, B-list actor)
Something like a Sigma (Jimmy Stewart)

Script has many truths.

 
Hazaer said:
'The Neighbor'(2018)

Happened on it by chance but this is another movie that is relevant to most of the topics that the forum talks about. Applicable to life in the burbs, almost every scene has a lesson to learn whether it's self improvement, game, family etc.
I like it, too, but I felt like it never reached the potential it had.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
griffinmill said:

My favourite film of all time is The Player. Tim Robbins plays a studio executive who murders a writer he thinks has been harassing him with threatening postcards. He kills the wrong person. The Tim Robbins character (Griffin Mill; my namesake) is a masterclass in not breaking frame, maintaining steely resolve, and being totally smooth. The film is notable not least for the scene where he breaks up with his girlfriend without breaking a sweat. It's directed by Robert Altman, has a perfect score from Thomas Newman, and is just an all-round excellent film. Watch out for the cold, hypergamous instincts of Greta Scacchi.
Speaking of the luscious Greta Scacchi.



Paul Newman’s comment after seeing the picture was “You don’t get to see the tits you want to see, and you get to see the ones you don’t want to see.”
 

Hazaer

Kingfisher
Psygnosis89 said:
Hazaer said:
'The Neighbor'(2018)

Happened on it by chance but this is another movie that is relevant to most of the topics that the forum talks about. Applicable to life in the burbs, almost every scene has a lesson to learn whether it's self improvement, game, family etc.
I like it, too, but I felt like it never reached the potential it had.
How so?
I am guessing it was one of those low budget films. I thought it covered some important points though. The lead character was a bit stiff for some reason I can't quite figure out but it paints quite a raw picture of the consequences of oneitis, lack of keeping frame in a marriage and letting this show outside, white knighting and female nature, even if we leave aside his decision to step outside his marriage.
 

Hypno

Hummingbird
Saw great flick from the 70s, Three Days of the Condor. Robert Redford is a CIA agent who returns from lunch to find his entire office has been murdered. So he goes on the run and has to figure out what the killers were after all while being a target. Interesting subplot with a pre-wall Faye Dunaway.
 

Thomas Jackson

Woodpecker
Hell or High Water

Modern western - that has themes of brotherhood, sacrifice for family, duty, and the hollowing out of America by (((bankers))). Soundtrack is awesome too.

Chris Pine's character is a bit bent over by his ex wife, but he's seems to genuinely trying to do right by his son's so didnt bother me too much.
 

Hypno

Hummingbird
Peter Fonda dead at age 79. Famous for the 1969 film, Easy Rider.

OK, this is a liberal dream film, and towards the end its cut a little surreal. But this film is worth watching for several reasons. First, its an historic film and defined the hippy generation to some extent. Second, this is the film that launched Jack Nicholson who had a small part.

From a broad game perspective, its about 2 guys who decide to live life on their terms. They meet various people who are attempting to do the same thing. This is a big theme of the film.

From a narrower perspective, there are two interesting interactions with females. First, when they stop at a commune, Fonda and Hopper have different results with women. Next, at a diner in the South, their hippy clothes and appearance (peacocking I guess) endear them to a group of young girls and threatens the local men.
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Watched "Day of the Siege" with F Murray Abraham on Amazon last week. It's a Polish/Italian historical film documenting the 1683 siege of Vienna; the filmmakers draw pretty clear parallels between the historical invasion and the current one.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Hypno said:
Peter Fonda dead at age 79. Famous for the 1969 film, Easy Rider.

OK, this is a liberal dream film, and towards the end its cut a little surreal. But this film is worth watching for several reasons. First, its an historic film and defined the hippy generation to some extent. Second, this is the film that launched Jack Nicholson who had a small part.

From a broad game perspective, its about 2 guys who decide to live life on their terms. They meet various people who are attempting to do the same thing. This is a big theme of the film.

From a narrower perspective, there are two interesting interactions with females. First, when they stop at a commune, Fonda and Hopper have different results with women. Next, at a diner in the South, their hippy clothes and appearance (peacocking I guess) endear them to a group of young girls and threatens the local men.
Good art; great soundtrack; poor life lessons. Worth a watch.
 
moneyshot said:
Dunno if this has been mentioned before, but has anyone else noticed the term "Fight Club", the movie's great quotes, and the entire movie (to an extent) going mainstream? Should this be concerning?
Yes it's concerning because the content and events in the book and film are cloaked in homosexual symbolism. Be careful what you consume and endear.
 

jcrew247

Kingfisher
I don't really think Brad Pitt is a good actor.
He was good in his role in Thelma and Louise.
Fight Club was interesting but I agree that the author
is likely homeosexual.
I thought ingolreous basterds was okay but alittle farfetched
but it was really embraced by the jewish audiences.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
jcrew247 said:
I don't really think Brad Pitt is a good actor.
He was good in his role in Thelma and Louise.
Fight Club was interesting but I agree that the author
is likely homeosexual.
I thought ingolreous basterds was okay but alittle farfetched
but it was really embraced by the jewish audiences.
He was terrific in a small role as the burnout Floyd in "True Romance."

 

Bolly

Kingfisher
Speaking of easy rider, this was always my favorite scene from that movie. A lot of truth packed into two minutes. Most people give up on their dreams, and keep themselves plugged into globohomocorporateconsumermarryusedwomengetuselessdegreeforuselessjob world of only wanting to feel safe which gives them a false sense of security or freedom when it's anything but now matter how hard they try and convince themselves otherwise. Until they meet someone who reminds them it's a fraud and shatters their fragile notion.

All he wanted, was to be free...
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Spectrumwalker said:
Speaking of easy rider, this was always my favorite scene from that movie. A lot of truth packed into two minutes.
What a load of BS. According to that avant garde definition of freedom, the homeless who crap all over San Francisco, Los Angeles, and other large liberal hell holes are the only truly free Americans. And the criminals who belong to outlaw motorcycle gangs.

Freedom and liberty always come with personal responsibility and civic duty. Otherwise, we are all simply savages. The "Lord of the Flies" teaches a much better lesson about the nature of humanity and the frailty of civilization.

The societal philosophy of "Easy Rider" is emblematic of the warped 1960's thinking that ultimately destroyed America.
 

Bolly

Kingfisher
Tail Gunner said:
Spectrumwalker said:
I'll give ya this one. I do agree with that. Leave it to the damn boomers. But still, a busted clock can still be right. But what I said about a lot of truth being packed into two minutes. It's true because in the here and now I think it applies more so than it did back then now when everyone is so atomized, digitized and roboticized. It's easy to unplug yourself and find freedom while still maintaing a sense of honor to ones country. But just by doing your own thing and calling bullshit where you see it. I.e. being redpilled and living life as such. No need to get ornery here. I believe in civic duty to an extent...if it's worth it. Which looking around, ain't really. But if ya think about the only taxes homeless pay are when they stumble into 7/11 to buy booze and smokes. That's pretty free. Mean you can't even own a home without paying rent to the government who then take that money and give to the local library to have trannies tell stories to kids. Fuck it all.
 

Papaya

Crow
Gold Member
Tail Gunner said:
jcrew247 said:
I don't really think Brad Pitt is a good actor.
He was good in his role in Thelma and Louise.
Fight Club was interesting but I agree that the author
is likely homeosexual.
I thought ingolreous basterds was okay but alittle farfetched
but it was really embraced by the jewish audiences.
He was terrific in a small role as the burnout Floyd in "True Romance."

Brad Pitt is capable of being an exceptional actor. The problem he has is just as others in "the business" that being a movie star is much more profitable than being great actor.

Watch this clip from 12 MONKEYS (1996)*. He was still early in his career and played a significant but supporting role. But he shows phenomenal acting chops as looney kid that knows the truth




*Movie is worth watching by the way. Bruce Willis does his usual



Plus Madeleine Stowe...nuf said

 

Richard Turpin

Kingfisher
I've never seen Easy Rider. I've seen clips and stills and somehow it's just one of those movies that gives me a visceral feeling of revulsion. I think it might be something to do with Hippies, or maybe Dennis Hopper (who I only ever liked in Speed).

Just looking through his filmography, I've only seen a couple of his movies; The Cannonball Run and Race with the Devil. I didn't even know he was in them and can't remember him at all! I remember being terrified of Race with the Devil as a child though.

I re-watched Unforgiven the other day. Don't know if it's been mentioned yet but I feel it qualifies as Red-pilled due to the gritty realism (killing is dirty, hap-hazard and regretful) and the sexual dynamics (all the women are prostitutes!).

Great film. Gene Hackman was excellent as Little Bill (who sees right through the pomp and bluster of English Bob) and gives him a right good kicking. I'd be happy to live in a town with a sheriff like Little Bill, who just wants to be left alone in peace to build his house.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Richard Turpin said:
I re-watched Unforgiven the other day. Don't know if it's been mentioned yet but I feel it qualifies as Red-pilled due to the gritty realism (killing is dirty, hap-hazard and regretful) and the sexual dynamics (all the women are prostitutes!).

Great film. Gene Hackman was excellent as Little Bill (who sees right through the pomp and bluster of English Bob) and gives him a right good kicking. I'd be happy to live in a town with a sheriff like Little Bill, who just wants to be left alone in peace to build his house.
"Unforgiven" is one of my favorite Westerns, which really says something -- as I love Westerns. I disagree that Little Bill saw any bluster in English Bob, who he took very very seriously. Little Bill surrounded Bob with half-a-dozen armed men before taking Bob's guns. Later, after telling the story of Two-Guns, he placed English Bob in a no-win situation with Bob having to reach for a gun through the bars of his cell if he wanted revenge for his beating. Little Bill recognized English Bob as a very dangerous man and he never gave him any real chance for violence. Excellent actors and actresses all around.
 
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