Resisting against coronavirus laws

SeaEagle

Sparrow
@Laner
Teachers are by and large incompetent in preparing students for life. It's a cushy gig. I had maybe one or two good teachers in my public school experience. Some were negligent, pilled-out, and red faced buffoons who had to spend what little energy they had on the problem (abused) children.

They won't protect your kid from bullies and will prevent your kid from ever fighting back under zero tolerance policies. Not to mention the moral degradation from the other secular students and curriculum.

The issue is that intelligent people usually devalue their own capacity as they have the vision for every conceivable pitfall. I wish your family luck, and perhaps your wealthy neighbourhood is a stumbling block. God bless.
 

Mountaineer

Ostrich
Gold Member
Haha, hope this is what it says it is. Can anyone pick up the language? I wonder where this happened.

Great if true but I doubt it. Looks like anything east of Albania. Could be Greece. One thing is certain, the damage to these trucks is very substantial. To replace a cabin takes at least a week of labor in any workshop and a hefty bill. And it's five units, the company could very well go bust in the result of this.
 
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@Laner
Teachers are by and large incompetent in preparing students for life. It's a cushy gig. I had maybe one or two good teachers in my public school experience. Some were negligent, pilled-out, and red faced buffoons who had to spend what little energy they had on the problem (abused) children.

They won't protect your kid from bullies and will prevent your kid from ever fighting back under zero tolerance policies. Not to mention the moral degradation from the other secular students and curriculum.

The issue is that intelligent people usually devalue their own capacity as they have the vision for every conceivable pitfall. I wish your family luck, and perhaps your wealthy neighbourhood is a stumbling block. God bless.
Teachers are by and large low IQ, lazy people, who do not want to work for a living.
 

An0dyne

Robin
Teachers are by and large low IQ, lazy people, who do not want to work for a living.
Speaking as someone who has been a teacher, it is very difficult to do the job well. There is so much administrative red tape and peripheral nonsense that gets prioritized over actual teaching. And the lack of attention, respect, and proper scaffolding among the students is demoralizing. Plus your hands are tied in terms of effective discipline. After teaching for a few weeks I gained nothing but respect for competent teachers. And I at least understood why so many just phone it in. Even those types are doing a lot of (meaningless) work—paperwork, etc.

Ultimately, the job is glorified babysitting of others’ kids. It’s why, if the Lord blesses my wife and I with children, we will absolutely homeschool. No way I’m letting someone else raise—much less educate and indoctrinate—my kids.

Edit: my experience is in low-paid private school settings, so I’m sure the entitlement and phoning-in is worse in public. Can’t imagine even thinking about sending my kids there.
 
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Sam Malone

Ostrich
Gold Member
Teachers are by and large low IQ, lazy people, who do not want to work for a living.
^ truth

I have a cousin who is a teacher. Lazy, stubborn, unhealthy, entitled, outspoken, and a lot of posturing... until the rubber meets the road, and then folds under the least amount of pressure.

Also very passive-aggressive (that I see in a lot of teachers). One family get-together, she plodded up to the house, came in and kicked her shoes off, plopped down on the couch, started snacking, and then looked at my oldest (Sam Jr) and asked, "Would you like to go out to my car and get my purse."

My kid looked at her and said, "No. I wouldn't 'like' to. But, if you would like me to, just ask me."

Some polite back and forth about who was misinterpreting or misunderstanding words, until I pointed out that she asked if Jr WANTED to go get her purse. He didn't WANT to. But he will if you need him to.

When we left, I told Jr and the other kids that from here on out, that cow can stumble back down to her car and get her crap herself.

After having conversations with her, it scares me that she is in the position to influence children.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
@Laner
Teachers are by and large incompetent in preparing students for life. It's a cushy gig. I had maybe one or two good teachers in my public school experience. Some were negligent, pilled-out, and red faced buffoons who had to spend what little energy they had on the problem (abused) children.

They won't protect your kid from bullies and will prevent your kid from ever fighting back under zero tolerance policies. Not to mention the moral degradation from the other secular students and curriculum.

The issue is that intelligent people usually devalue their own capacity as they have the vision for every conceivable pitfall. I wish your family luck, and perhaps your wealthy neighbourhood is a stumbling block. God bless.

My son is pretty aware of that fact that he will be having to deal with the principal more now than before. He witnessed a girl get bullied by an older kid and by the time the monitor got there the damage had been done. So we had the chat - That when you need help, its always going to be 5 minutes too late. Better to learn to take care of things yourself.

And my neighborhood is indeed a stumbling block, but not in the way you might be thinking. We live in the poorest neighborhood in Canada, which is in the most expensive city in Canada. The stumbling block is that no matter how much they try tell these kids drugs/degeneracy/criminals are good/victims/not their fault - these kids instantly know its total BS and ignore them.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
^ truth

I have a cousin who is a teacher. Lazy, stubborn, unhealthy, entitled, outspoken, and a lot of posturing... until the rubber meets the road, and then folds under the least amount of pressure.

Also very passive-aggressive (that I see in a lot of teachers). One family get-together, she plodded up to the house, came in and kicked her shoes off, plopped down on the couch, started snacking, and then looked at my oldest (Sam Jr) and asked, "Would you like to go out to my car and get my purse."

My kid looked at her and said, "No. I wouldn't 'like' to. But, if you would like me to, just ask me."

Some polite back and forth about who was misinterpreting or misunderstanding words, until I pointed out that she asked if Jr WANTED to go get her purse. He didn't WANT to. But he will if you need him to.

When we left, I told Jr and the other kids that from here on out, that cow can stumble back down to her car and get her crap herself.

After having conversations with her, it scares me that she is in the position to influence children.
Sam Jr has to read Melville's Bartleby, and stubbornly upgrade to a definite "I would prefer not to."
 
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