Resisting against coronavirus laws

Sam Malone

Ostrich
Gold Member
The only reason I wear a mask when going out is because I've got better things to spend $200 on than a pound of flesh in a jewish kangaroo court.
I was prepared to write a novel on here about exactly the same thing.

Rep to Fokker for putting it more succinctly than I can.
 

godfather dust

Ostrich
Gold Member
I went camping last weekend with some friends who I guess are normies, as it turns out. One has said that masks are a fear-based response but complies anyway, the others are pretty much all-in.
We go into town nearby and stop at a general store. They mask up and offer me one. I decline, and tell them I bet no one in there is wearing one. We enter the store where there are a few customers and clerks, none of them masked. I can’t even remember the last time that happened but it was a much needed dose of sanity.

This was in my state where there is a mask mandate which, according to the governor, will remain until there is a vaccine or cure. Lately I’ve been thinking about moving, either to another state or at least a more rural area.
Probably my state.

I never thought I'd leave due to almost my entire large, extended family living here, but with talk of cancelling Thanksgiving because many (most) are shook/scared/****ified from this hoax, definitely thinking about it now.
 

SpyofMoses

Pigeon
In many ways this pandemic has been positive for me regarding personal development.

Amen, brother. At first, this gave me great anxiety- a feeling I'm not used to at all. Learning how to be calm through that was a process, but now I can honestly say I've made a habit of prayer for the first time since I was an apostate. Praying for people and meaning it has helped more than anything for the anxiety. People have made me angry more often than ever before, so instead of "getting back" at them, I take it out by lifting when I get home. I'm much stronger than I was since January. Just praying and working out so much has been a hugely beneficial lifestyle change for me. Thank you, plandemic for testing our fortitude!
 

Amwolf

Robin
As a non-mask wearer myself, I had my first "Karen" experience yesterday at a large retailer that services a specific industry. I normally don't patronize multinational big box retailers, but had to take care of some business documentation. Nonetheless, I've stopped by this retailer several of times since the mandatory mask mandate and haven't had an issue as I always stop by later in the evening. During past visits, compliance was about 50% and even the employees had their mask down.

Well, that changed last night when I overheard a customer (a middle aged man) making a comment to an employee about how they were uncomfortable using the self-service machines because there was another customer who was unmasked in the vicinity. A couple of minutes later, an employee politely asked if I wanted a mask. I replied with "No, I have multiple medical conditions that qualify for exemption. Thank you for your concern." (which is true in my case, even though though I wouldn't wear one otherwise for ideological and religious reasons), and that concluded this matter as I continued with my work.
 

homersheineken

Woodpecker
I don't think there is one gun/local sporting good store in America that enforces mask rules. In fact almost all discourage them. Even if you are anti-gun they are refreshing places to go and hang out with normal dudes.
Not true, ours does. I even got asked to pull it up over my nose by the cashier... And she was behind a large piece of plastic. Wtf?!
 

Mountaineer

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I've noticed that whether a certain group of people treats the virus scare seriously or not is directly linked to their individual level of courage which is a result of their lifestyle. During the summer I've been to quite a few motorsport events, I've met people who paraglide and those who do high mountain trekking or climbing. 99.9% percent of the people in all those groups behaved like they never ever heard about the virus scare and I think that the reason behind this is acceptance and willingness to take risks. Sports I've mentioned are known to be risky, there is an inseparable element of danger to them. People who pursue them know about it and have learned to live with it for the sport. They're not wimps, they accept the dangers. What is a virus? A danger but these people are already used to handle danger on a regular basis. It's not a problem to them. When I made this connection it shot me like a diamond.

That's why the old days of less comfort, less safety in general, less wealth created more courageous people. It was still the case in the first part of 20th century. You had to be tough to survive and thrive. There was still space for dangerous fun. If we had more of this today... Maybe the coming decline will bring some of that back.
 

Papaya

Crow
Gold Member
I've noticed that whether a certain group of people treats the virus scare seriously or not is directly linked to their individual level of courage which is a result of their lifestyle. During the summer I've been to quite a few motorsport events, I've met people who paraglide and those who do high mountain trekking or climbing. 99.9% percent of the people in all those groups behaved like they never ever heard about the virus scare and I think that the reason behind this is acceptance and willingness to take risks. Sports I've mentioned are known to be risky, there is an inseparable element of danger to them. People who pursue them know about it and have learned to live with it for the sport. They're not wimps, they accept the dangers. What is a virus? A danger but these people are already used to handle danger on a regular basis. It's not a problem to them. When I made this connection it shot me like a diamond.

That's why the old days of less comfort, less safety in general, less wealth created more courageous people. It was still the case in the first part of 20th century. You had to be tough to survive and thrive. There was still space for dangerous fun. If we had more of this today... Maybe the coming decline will bring some of that back.
Bingo

Long ago in a forum far far away I wrote a post (or 100) about my theories on there being fear primary driven personalities (FPDP) and desire primary driven personalities (DPDP)

Funny so many of life's outcomes such sex, wealth, etc can be linked to F and D characteristics
 

Roosh

Cardinal
I went to Walmart today and as I walked through the doors, I heard a series of "Sir, sir!" from three distinct voices. I ignored them and kept going. Once you're in the store, it's hard to get you out, so I aim just to get in. It would be quite an ordeal to follow me, call security, etc.

I find that pretending I'm deaf with zero engagement or eye contact is the easiest path. I don't feel good about doing it (since it's rude) but that's how it is.
 
In the ghetto Walmart of Montgomery it's about 70-80% compliance. In the nicer areas, 90% or more.
Interesting. The Walmart I use is in a small town of less than 4000, predominantly white, and it's about half and half. 30 miles away, in more ghetto areas of Greenville, SC, there seems to be more compliance than here.
 
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