Respectable "traditional" daily men's fashion

nagareboshi

Woodpecker
But on the other, I do feel bad about the idea of buying new clothing when the ones I have are still in good condition, because that is also consumerist behavior. Will definitely upgrade my wardrobe when I hit the point of having to be taken more seriously.

Just letting you know, you might be interested in donating those clothes to people who need it, and you can even get a tax deduction from it. You can also give them away as hand-me-down items to relatives. Furthermore, you might be interested in wearing them guilt-free in the context of athletics, basically reduce the wardrobe size by 80% but leave the remaining for when you hit the gym.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
I'm guilty of wearing t-shirts and jeans all the time (in warmer months) but I solved this conundrum by getting really high-quality, well-fitting, minimalist versions of these things. The biggest issue is not intrinsically the clothing, but the fact that so many guys have no idea how to wear stuff that fits properly. Boomer guys started it, always wearing huge t-shirts and cargo shorts that are way too big, and we've been living with the fallout ever since. On the other extreme you have guys who've gone too far the other direction, wearing clothing that's far too tight. The truth lies between these extremes. Most days my clothing is pretty unobstructive and doesn't really stand out one way or the other.

I like the idea of trying to dress in a more civilized manner though. In addition to what's already been mentioned, I'd suggest looking to mid-century military wear for inspiration - flight jackets, chambray shirts, chino trousers, service boots or minimalist sneakers. This can look dignified, but with a bit of an edge.
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Great thread.

I finally realized about 2 years ago, at the age of 34, that I needed to update my perennial adolescent surfer dude / beach bum style, and take more care in my overall appearance and grooming.

This led me to finding some great small-scale, more ethical, and handmade brands that I had no idea existed, as well as some tips from YT channels like Real Men, Real Style etc. It also led to me buying my first suit (not full bespoke, but still custom tailored), which really came in handy when I ended up getting married a year later.

I've lived in hot climates most of my life and finally understanding clothing materials is a Godsend. Quality lightweight cotton and linen will save your life and you can wear clothes that you would never have though possible after a lifetime of sweating and stinking to death wearing polyester and other unideal blends. Sharp looking jacket in the summer? No problem. I especially prefer cotton/linen blend, as I'm not a fan of pure linen in most cases. Switching old worn out jeans and cargo shorts to cotton slacks / chinos is a big upgrade. I've worn lightweight pure cotton Chino's or Seersuckers in sweltering conditions and felt totally comfortable, plus the benefit of keeping your legs from getting sunburned. Initially I thought I could get away with super cheap stuff like Uniqlo or Zara, but I really don't recommend them based on experience. Poor quality and durability across the board, and not well made for breathability and durability. Go with something small-scale and handmade, and local if preferred, though I'm in the US and some of my favorite brands are in Europe and Japan and Korea.

I understand that "upgrading" all your clothes, especially if your current clothes are not really worn out, or just simply spending more than you are used to on clothes is not for everyone. Just let me be another voice saying that it is worth it, but do it smart, and take your time. No need to rush and buy something you'll regret later. However, with something as personal as clothing, there is an element of trial and error. Thankfully, many people can recognize great quality clothing and are willing to buy it from you even lightly used in the case of jackets and things like that.
 
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kel

Ostrich
I subscribe to the old advice of dressing just a little bit better than most people will in whatever your situation is. Conveniently, since standards have dropped, it's very easy to do. I wear tailored but comfortable pants (Dickies style, whatever that's called. Khakis, essentially, but not the color) and a simple, tailored button up shirt or polo shirt or een just a plain t. That's all it takes to look more adult and put together than most of the men I see at work and out and about.
 

Bright_Sun

Pigeon
As FiatVoluntasTua said, if you want to dress more respectable, in a nutshell, opt for Chinos/Slacks instead of Jeans(though I would argue there is a way to wear dark jeans in a respectable way) and a long sleeve button up for top. Wear respectable shoes as well (No sneakers).

The channel below has been my go-to for years. It's been around for a very long time. To be honest, I actually havent viewed his videos in years since I learned all I needed to years back, but it seems he's still going strong:


Just search "wardrobe" and any one of his videos should help you. You may also Search "Summer", "winter" etc and it will point you to videos he has made in regards to what to wear throughout the season. Here is a sample video:


RMRS is my go-to for style advice. I used to watch alpha m. (a little too cringey and salesman-like) and teachingmensfashion (Jose acts like his main audience is teens). Most of the time, RMRS feels like it has the right balance.

I used to worry about having a perfect wardrobe (ie. multiple colors of every type of top, bottom, shoes, and accessories), but then I realized the only time I used them was to go grocery shopping.

So instead of bothering with putting on a turtleneck, peacoat, scarf, boots, gloves, cologne, etc. (wintertime of course), I usually just go out with a well-fitting shirt and sweater, jeans, nice sneakers, and a watch because it saves me time.

I remember a Youtube video by Matt D'Avella, a minimalist, where he talked about wearing the same color t-shirt everyday for 3 years. He had something like 7 charcoal t-shirts.

However, I do agree that most people nowadays dress like bums (especially at Walmart), and dressing nicely does make me feel a lot more confident. Seeing other people's posts on this thread makes me want to up my style-game.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
If you simply don't wear sweatpants, you're probably in the top half of best dressed men. And if you elevate things above jeans and tees, you're probably in the top 10%. Amazing how far we've fallen as a culture.

Good point. Properly-fitting jeans and t-shirts will make you look more dignified than most.

I see this one look everywhere nowadays, which I assume is inspired by some mishmash of hip-hop and electronica fashion, but comes across as the official globohomo uniform for young men:

- Tight sweatpants that are too short
- Loud, flashy sneakers
- T-shirt that goes down to knees
- Multiple necklaces, bracelets, rings, piercings
- Hair buzzed on the sides, long on the top
- Gay, sculpted facial hair that looks like those weirdo styles from The Hunger Games.
- Though increasingly white guys have adopted this style, the archetypal adherent of this style is an ethnically ambiguous brown dude. Is he from Morocco? Brazil? India? Turkey? Who knows!

Barring this, the standard look for a lot of guys I see is gym shorts and Underarmor shirts or whatever similar brand: the "I just came from the gym" look. Reminds me a little of how twenty years ago, when I was in middle school, it was the "I just came from the beach" look. Cheesy Nsync/LFO spiky bleached hair, Hawaiian shirts and trashy/suggestive tees, cargo shirts, flip-flops, everything sized a couple sizes too big, preferably all from Abercrombie and Fitch.
 

dicknixon72

Pelican
I'm with this train of thought 100%. I always dressed up since 7th grade.

Recalling my first day of high school back in '99. My father always sent me off on the 'first day of school' with a picture, slacks, dress shirt, and a tie.

A Junior thought I was the new AP.

The whole dressed-up thing was my deal from then on, sans tie because it is Florida after all. I was by no means a star for popularity - nor did I care about that - but I feel it was respected in a way.

I've moved away from the short-sleeve dress shirt because I feel it has too much of a Dilbert/Falling Down/Gene Hackman in Mississippi Burning vibe. Still prefer the business casual attire of nice dress pants, button-down long-sleeve that can be rolled up, etc. Can't stand seeing so-called adults walking around like grown children with PJ tops, sweatpants, and that stupid mushroom-top hairstyle that is en vogue today.
 
Can't stand seeing so-called adults walking around like grown children with PJ tops, sweatpants, and that stupid mushroom-top hairstyle that is en vogue today.
Dressing well but not ostentatiously means you will stand out - like a grown man among soyboys - not to crave attention but a clear symbol that you reject clown world and believe human beings have dignity. Dressing well isn't just self-respect- though it is that - it shows reverence for the body God gave you- its also respect for others, even if they don't deserve it.

One thing to avoid is the 'baby boomer' khakis and polos look - its not so much either of those are bad - just the way they were worn it became the fed ex guys's uniform - and looked cheap. Having quality well fitting khakis -not big "tents' of ill fitting clothing like baby boomers did to hide their waistline - will look good.

A jacket that is cheap or not properly fit looks really bad- you can get used jackets on ebay and such often of great or BETTER quality than new ones -and get those altered to fit you properly.


Here is a good guide to fits -the 'relaxed' fit is a higher rise- more traditional but with alterations you have a sharp appearance with a higher rise
 

IM3000

Pelican
You should never wear short-sleeve dress shirts. Well, never unless you are a bus driver.

Also, my revelation of the year was that jeans just suck. I have worn them since forever and at almost 40, I realized that they suck. They are uncomfortable, not very breathable and heavy. Plus, in most cases, they don't look very nice.

I don't really like Dickies-style Khakis. For chino-like pants which are not super expensive but somewhat dressy, I like the Swedish Marc O Polo brand.
 
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my revelation of the year was that jeans just suck. I have worn them since forever and at almost 40, I realized that they suck. They are uncomfortable, no very breathable and heavy.
Yes. Practical for.... nothing... I mentioned a few posts up it is so funny that feminists in India wear them as a symbol of 'liberation' - yeah wearing a heavy move restricting unbreathable cloth made by globalists that in a hot climate will probably help give you yeast infections over tradtional wear that complimented the body type, was flexible and breathable.. yeah that makes sense.

But the hands down champion stupidest thing I have seen is 'hikers' wearing them in winter.

It really is amazing how people can be convinced to wear something because of fashion.

The funny thing is cowboys never wore them, they thought they were impractical (and didn't ride high enough in the waist for horseback riding)
 
You should never wear short-sleeve dress shirts. Well, never unless you are a bus driver.

Also, my revelation of the year was that jeans just suck. I have worn them since forever and at almost 40, I realized that they suck. They are uncomfortable, not very breathable and heavy. Plus, in most cases, they don't look very nice.

I don't really like Dickies-style Khakis. For chino-like pants which are not super expensive but somewhat dressy, I like the Swedish Marc O Polo brand.

As FiatVoluntasTua said, if you want to dress more respectable, in a nutshell, opt for Chinos/Slacks instead of Jeans(though I would argue there is a way to wear dark jeans in a respectable way) and a long sleeve button up for top. Wear respectable shoes as well (No sneakers).

The channel below has been my go-to for years. It's been around for a very long time. To be honest, I actually havent viewed his videos in years since I learned all I needed to years back, but it seems he's still going strong:


Just search "wardrobe" and any one of his videos should help you. You may also Search "Summer", "winter" etc and it will point you to videos he has made in regards to what to wear throughout the season. Here is a sample video:

This is great, thanks. I'm going to be traveling soon hopefully and my SoCal wardrobe is pretty much just tees, henleys, shorts and niceish pants. Never gets below 40 here, yet I see people in sweatshirts/sweatpants almost year round, it's very weird. Feeling like I should step up my game when visiting less slovenly places.
 
I am pleased to have found this topic as I am planning to improve my fashion as well. I really enjoyed the Washington Examiner article provided and I agree with the idea of perpetual adolescence. What is interesting is that many in the lower classes (when not working in the fields, factories, or mines) dressed better than many upper class people today. Yes, their suits, pants, and dress shirts might not have been the top brand and maybe they only had a couple sets but they still at least had pants and a collared button shirt. Dressing fairly well is not expensive considering you can buy decent second-hand suits for $10-20 (and likely pretty nice second-hand suits for $50-100). I think that if you dress well (within reason), you will be treated with more respect overall even by people who are very casual. What is funny is that many people pay huge prices to look sloppy. The trend of buying jeans with pre-made holes and a lot of other hipster wear is ridiculous. Mark Zuckerberg is an example of a man that dresses far too casually for someone presenting new business ideas. To me it shows he doesn't represent his audience. Yes, if he is going to the supermarket it is fine, but at work he should at least wear a collared shirt and presentable trousers.

Below is a good video about an expat who always wears a suit. He is in China (where I also worked and plan to return to soon) and as a non-east Asian foreigner, you are definitely noticed in China. Many Chinese people have negative impressions of foreigners, but if you dress well and act professionally (as this man does-I recommend his other videos of his as well if you plan to work in, or even visit, China. Even if you are a low-paid English teacher, people will still at least view you as someone that is respectful and making an effort to be professional. As a foreigner, you stand out and it is doubly important to create a good first impression. Actually, China is somewhat casual so wearing a suit will make you stand out in most cities.

 
What a class act, doing so much to spread the good image of foreigners in Asia. Here is his Twitter by the way.

To be fair, in China, Japan, and South Korea this is a legitimate issue. One bad foreigner does something (like a soldier raping a girl for example) and many (not all) people are quick to paint all foreigners with the same brush. In these countries, it is even more important to create a good impression due to negative stereotypes. Learning about the culture, dressing respectfully, and speaking politely are all doubly important for expats. China is not the easiest or most welcoming country for foreigners. Foreigners need to accept (while knowing it is rude) that in China, discrimination against foreigners is acceptable and even sometimes required (for example, it insulted me that many hotels ban foreigners but I can't change the law and would usually just choose to take my vacations outside of China-let hotels in foreign nations get my money instead).

Imagine Winston walked around with holy jeans and a grubby tied-dyed t-shirt with dreadlocks. People would see him as a loser backpacker (even if he was a wealthy CEO like Zuckerberg). What he said about teaching a class of doctors while wearing a suit is important. The students felt he respected them by dressing nicely. They felt he was being serious and professional. I remember thinking how odd it was that my chemistry teacher in university wore jeans to teach. I thought it was a bit disrespectful. I was not angry, it is not a serious issue and he taught well but I did find it somewhat unprofessional for a university professor in his 40's. Winston found an attractive wife in China and they have a kid. Dressing well likely helped him find an attractive wife as well (it is not the only thing that matters but it doesn't hurt).
 

El Draque

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I've always liked the traditional English country attire. I dont really wear the fancy stuff, as a) its expensive, and b) being of somewhat Meditterean appearance, it always feels somewhat incongrous.

This is of Cordings, a top end store in London. If you go to any English country town, you would find dialled down versions of this (cheaper & a bit more relaxed). Not so much aimed at the 'sporting gentlemen' as in here with the tweeds & somewhat peacocking aspect, but at the traditional working rural population.

Cant really go far wrong there IMHO.

 
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