Reviews of American Pilgrim

PaulC

Robin
Having followed the video series and attended two of the events detailed, I was pleased to find that this book was more than just an extended play-by-play of the tour. It is that of course. However, the real meat of the book was Roosh's deeper reflections on both his personal journey and the state of our nation.

Roosh takes passing moments from the travel vlogs and expands upon them in an edifying way that makes it well worth the read even for those familiar with the tour. For example, I remember well Roosh's genuine bemusement when Dr. Jones shot down his cabin idea. It is interesting to see which ideas like that stuck with him, and to see them fleshed out.

Despite the serious topic, Roosh's wry humour shines through and it is a very enjoyable read.

A bit of housekeeping:

p. 299 - The phrase "lower backache" is used. I'm guessing it autocorrected from back ache.

pp. 182, 183 - "ax" is used instead of "axe". I know this is a stylistic choice, but I find ax to be jarring and brutalist. The AP style of unnecessarily shortening words in American English is not to my liking.

p. 183 - The word Pug isn't capitalized. Again, I know this is AP style. However, many style guides disagree as well as the AKC (American Kennel Club) registry of breeds.

p. 209 - Golden Retriever (see above).
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Having followed the video series and attended two of the events detailed, I was pleased to find that this book was more than just an extended play-by-play of the tour. It is that of course. However, the real meat of the book was Roosh's deeper reflections on both his personal journey and the state of our nation.

Roosh takes passing moments from the travel vlogs and expands upon them in an edifying way that makes it well worth the read even for those familiar with the tour. For example, I remember well Roosh's genuine bemusement when Dr. Jones shot down his cabin idea. It is interesting to see which ideas like that stuck with him, and to see them fleshed out.

Despite the serious topic, Roosh's wry humour shines through and it is a very enjoyable read.

A bit of housekeeping:

p. 299 - The phrase "lower backache" is used. I'm guessing it autocorrected from back ache.

pp. 182, 183 - "ax" is used instead of "axe". I know this is a stylistic choice, but I find ax to be jarring and brutalist. The AP style of unnecessarily shortening words in American English is not to my liking.

p. 183 - The word Pug isn't capitalized. Again, I know this is AP style. However, many style guides disagree as well as the AKC (American Kennel Club) registry of breeds.

p. 209 - Golden Retriever (see above).
You're a fast reader. :)
 
I have just finished reading @Roosh 's latest book entitled American Pilgrim. The title works I think on two levels: pilgrim here refers not only to the literal definition of the word, a traveler, but could also mean Pilgrim with a capital P because Roosh is a religious person in a country that is basically new to him and many others: Degenerate America. Ever since LGBTQ acceptance spiked and gay pride flags started being strung up every which way, the country hasn't been the same. This book is about the journey of a man who, after reaching a dead-end in his life, was graced by God and now wishes to share his own story with others. But this is not as easy as it sounds because during his 17,000 mile five-month speaking tour Roosh faces many temptations and doubts. In addition to many physically attractive women being placed on his path (a cruel reminder of his past misdeeds and Satan trying to tempt him no doubt), he finds himself coveting over material possessions such as a cabin, a homestead, and even a motorcycle. Does he make it through? I think we know the answer.

I really liked this book. It shares the same structure as his other books A Dead Bat in Paraguay and Free Speech Isn't Free in that it jumps from place to place detailing anecdotes. I liked reading about the churches that you visited and the landmarks that you saw and the inner battles you fought in your mind. There are some red pills here and there (self-sufficiency, governments, Hollywood, etc.) but this book is really about the God Pill. While this book may not be as sacred as say, something written by the early saints, it is still worth the read from a spiritual standpoint. Is this Roosh's best book yet? Well, I will leave you with this quote:

If just one sentence of this book brings you closer to God, it is more valuable than all my previous writing put together.
-American Pilgrim, pg. 134

This book brought me closer to God.

Errata

I am not a grammarian so I can't comment on that but I did find a few typos:

Page 204: "He will give you want you need" should be "He will give you what you need"
Page 234: "...who affirmed I that might not be in a heretical Church after all", "that" should come before "I"
Page 278: "...or what have you through Joe's inspirational preaching", you misspelled Joel Osteen's name as Joe
Page 359: "There were so hands-off..." should be "They were so hands-off..."
 
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TheFinalEpic

Pelican
Gold Member
I finished the book this morning. Here is my review:

Immediately, American Pilgrim strikes you as something new from Roosh. It's a travel story, a commentary on the United States, and a coming of age tale that will affirm your beliefs in God.

Detailing his 2019 speaking tour across the United States, Roosh visits 23 major cities, countless small towns and destinations, and just as many churches and monasteries. He speaks about the challenges and temptations he faces, the lessons he learns, and the way you can tell if a city is on the decline by visiting the local "homeless shelters" (I'll not spoil where that is, it made me laugh). The book is thought provoking, made me pause and reflect on my own life, and makes you realize what really matters.

The advice from Roosh's personal experience is invaluable for someone that is on the path to finding God. I have over 100 specific quotes that I wrote down from the pages of this book that hit home with me. Whether that be about keeping your faith alive in a world that trends towards Godlessness, forgoing temptations and hopping off the hedonic treadmill, living a "properly inverted life", where to find true beauty, and just overall focusing on the right things in this life - family, friendship, our own salvation and God.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone that is on the path to Christ. It will make you laugh, it will make you think. I very much enjoyed it, and thank you, Roosh, for allowing me to review it.

PS.
I can't believe you actually drove across the country in a Dodge Challenger.

With regard to spelling errors/grammar, @prendergast noted all the things that I had.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I can't believe you actually drove across the country in a Dodge Challenger.
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Hannibal

Ostrich
Gold Member
pg 30
but if Satan knows that your becoming rich or a successful . . .

That would be "you're".

I'm about a third of the way through the book so far. I really enjoyed the part about how people dolling themselves up to impress other people is akin to pigs rolling in the mud a specific way to impress other pigs. At the end of the day the folks with a focus on the secular are no different from pigs wallowing in their own filth.

There were also some mighty fine observations on lower class America with respects to the opioid epidemic.

I wanted to wait until I finished the book first to post a little review, but I did not want the one typo I did catch to be released with the book.
 

SlickyBoy

Hummingbird
Comments were closed for American Pilgrim, but I just wanted to say I think it is truly epic and positively American that he chose to have a Dodge Challenger on the cover - presumably the car in which he made his round the country drive.

I'm glad Roosh did not end up like Kowalski in the 1971 movie Vanishing Point. I won't drop the spoiler here, but lets just say if Kowalski found God he'd have been much better off.
 

kel

Ostrich
Dodge Challenger is one of the few cars made since... 1997? that has any kind of allure, that looks like something other than your typical blob sedan.
 

SlickyBoy

Hummingbird
Dodge Challenger is one of the few cars made since... 1997? that has any kind of allure, that looks like something other than your typical blob sedan.
Thing is, the new version was released so late (2008) that most of the first buyers were boomers who remembered the original. Younger buyers didn't really get it. But it's since caught on with a new audience and still lives. A true MAGA mobile, if ever there was one.
 
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