Reviews of American Pilgrim

Steiner

Sparrow
Finished American Pilgrim late last night and I must say it was the book I needed right now. It's one of those stories I wish I could read for the first time all over again.

I purchased the paperback, and for $20 it is a steal. The cover art is beautiful, it has almost a waxy feeling that will last. The font was appealing to the eye, spacing made reading a breeze, I found no errors in the type or the margins.

Moving on from the physical (pun intended), this book is rich in not only entertainment value but practical wisdom. One thing I have always appreciated about R.V. is that he is an extremely honest man. He doesn't pull any punches, including many personal things I would personally have a hard time opening up about. It conveys the feeling of talking to a good friend. The style of writing in American Pilgrim is almost Hemingway-esque, it is not mired in melodramatic prose or overly wordy.

I will leave out anything that could resemble a spoiler, but I will say that reading this in the post-Coronavirus world gives new meaning to many moments in the story, and I am glad that this is eventually addressed.

In closing, I would highly recommend this book to any man that shares our convictions. From a devout Christian to a PUA, they can all take something from the text, and I am sure this will be discussed for years to come. Thank you Roosh for sharing your experience and bringing it to life, you are truly becoming a fisher of men. God bless and good luck!
 
I just finished this book and thought I would post my thoughts (previous post was when I was 1/3 of the way through)

Definitely worth a read. I found it easy but worthwhile reading. I found myself reading it more than I wanted to, to the determent of other books on my queue :)

Who might enjoy reading it: Any man at a stage of transition/introspection. I am a bit older than Roosh, made some of the same mistakes (though not as grandly! ) and like many of us, looking for answers of what to do next, a little lost after being red/white pilled - waking up from the long slumber we were lulled into by global-homo.

What I liked about it: I am sure many of you have had the pleasant experience of finding a non-fiction book you really like that references other books and all the sudden you have a queue of books to read that really excite and interest you... I felt that way about Roosh's actions and travels in this book - and his thoughts (Should I homestead? can I? Where? ) what he actually did "with prayer I am not an expert but this is what I did (paraphrase) the places he visited (for example, I am intrigued to visit Amish country and stay at one of those b&bs, and any monastery that might take me as an overnight guest). While its not going to provide 'answers' it will help you in your transitional period. At least I feel that's what it did for me. Kind of like talking with someone you trust about a lot of issues you really can't talk about anywhere anymore. If Roosh were publishing this say through an NY publishing house, a considerable part would be removed - not that there is anything 'bad' or vulgar in it, just mild crimethink. Honesty is very refreshing in this day and age.

Suggestion for Readers
: Don't skip reading the appendix, but save it for the end, I really don't think it's an appendix, its really a nice wrap up to the whole book and puts the whole thing in perspective

Question for Roosh if you're reading: Did you every find out what the rash was (I don't think this is a spoiler :) ) .

Also, not an expert but seems like a lot of autoimmune/inflammatory issues, I have had similar found anti-flammatories and probiotics help a lot - and breathing techniques (Wim Hof, cold shower), and also being aware of stress like John Sarno suggests, writing it out.
 
I'm about halfway through and just finished reading chapter 11 where Roosh visits Owen Benjamin's homestead. It's really great so far and it makes me wish I had gone to one of his tour events back in 2019. The book reads like how Roosh talks and I will often find myself mentally reading it in his voice. I've also gone back and re-watched the Babylon Road series episodes that coincide with the parts that I've read and having visuals really helps me understand the book more. I want to build my library and I think Libido Dominandi will be my next read. Thank you Roosh for your work and I look forward to your future projects!
 

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Got my copy yesterday and I'm quickly working through the book. Roosh's dry sense of humor that we've seen in all his previous books remains the same even after his change. There's a part where he sees a transgender flag in a bar and he offers his own idea on what the flag should actually look like that got a smile out of me.

Great part of the book is that it isn't a straight up travel diary. Roosh's reactions to the sights he sees whether it be a natural one such as a mountain or seeing a bunch of homosexuals prancing around in some generic American city gets accompanied by either cultural or spiritual commentary. He encounters people of all stripes that range from practicing Christians to straight up atheist humanists such as the Dutch couple he meets at some Mennonite inn and you get to see how he responds to each of them.
 

Volador26

Pigeon
I purchased the online version as well as the paperback, because I had the feeling that this would be the sort of book I would like to have on my coffee table as or keep on my bookshelves to share with my future children. (I’ve purchased Lady for my nieces and one of my soon to be sister in laws; Uncle Roosh definitely has a lot of wisdom to offer).

American Pilgrim is a real adventure that among other things made me appreciate how special a Christ centered church is, and how a church can be its own little world no matter where you go in a country as vast as the U.S. The descriptions of said country are unflinchingly honest yet fair, and one of the most illuminating aspects of this book is how Roosh plainly connects how the most pressing issues afflicting society (homelessness, drug abuse, crime, etc) are inevitably the result of a nation that turns her back on her Creator.

Highly recommend this book. Thanks for writing this Roosh!
 

Pdalion

Pigeon
Just completed it.

As always a pleasant enjoyable read.

A passage that still stands out was from chapter 8 demons, " any inherently good act can be perverted into evil when separated from God's intended purpose." It made me think of discussions with my father about the traps laid out by the Devil as a young child. At that time I imagined them to be camouflaged pits in the road with spikes at the bottom. How much more cunning and subtle reality turns out to be.

There are some sobering accounts of the state of the USA, but I'm glad it ended with the hope that is Jesus Christ.

God bless.
Looking forward to your articles/books/podcasts to come!
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Nearly finished it. I have some more thoughts about the book.

A friend provided me a copy of Game a while back. I read about 20 pages before I bailed. Not just because the subject matter wasn't that interesting, but because the writing was amateurism. Reading American Pilgrim, I found that your style and voice has improved dramatically. It's more polished, thoughtful, and unique. I believe that only God's grace can transform something into art, and I see that in your writing. Your spiritual transformation has deepened your writing, giving it more meaning and focus.

I did find myself wishing you were more descriptive of the spaces you visited, including the monasteries and churches. I think one of themes of the book was the difference between the emptiness of the cookie cutter secular cities, versus God's beautiful creations in nature and the churches and monasteries that holy men built. Delving further into contrasting the two through descriptive imagery could bring those differences alive and really grab onto the emotional response of the reader.

As you moved through so many different places, the churches and monasteries blended together. There's some that stood out, like Joel's mega church, or the church with the iPad, but those were the exceptions. I never felt the beauty or complexity of these places that obviously touched you deeply. Were they musty and damp, or heavy with incense? Were they built with stone, brick, or wood? Were they situated deep in a forest, or just off a main road? What did the monks look like, or sound like?

I also think you had an opportunity to spend more time on describing the wicked places. Again, you visited many restaurants, bars, and hotels, but they blended together. Take the libraries for instance. I was a librarian before I practiced law, and I know that libraries are often where the city displays their current architectural, and therefore psycho-social, spaces. For example, libraries built in the 1900s are solemn, made of stone, and are quiet and foreboding. Libraries in the 70s and 80s are inflicted with brutalist architecture, meant to discourage riots and sit ins. Modern libraries are post-modernist monstrosities, made in a disjointed and Jewish style. You can understand a city by its libraries.

I know it was difficult because you visited so many places, but I don't think it's wrong to cut out some of the less remarkable places where not much happened to delve deeper into the ones that did.

With that said, it was one of the few modern books I couldn't put down and enjoyed reading. I think as you continue to get closer to God's grace, your writing will continue to mature, and I look forward to your next book.
 
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Your book was really inspiring Roosh. God has brought you a long way in a short period of time, its an amazing testimony to the power of God to take a man where he is and use his past to do good. Your love of birds reminded me of a character in Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov who as he is dying receives the faith and becomes entranced with birds also, and he says "is there anything better in this world than birds?"
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Nearly finished it. I have some more thoughts about the book.

A friend provided me a copy of Game a while back. I read about 20 pages before I bailed. Not just because the subject matter wasn't that interesting, but because the writing was amateurism. Reading American Pilgrim, I found that your style and voice has improved dramatically. It's more polished, thoughtful, and unique. I believe that only God's grace can transform something into art, and I see that in your writing. Your spiritual transformation has deepened your writing, giving it more meaning and focus.

I did find myself wishing you were more descriptive of the spaces you visited, including the monasteries and churches. I think one of themes of the book was the difference between the emptiness of the cookie cutter secular cities, versus God's beautiful creations in nature and the churches and monasteries that holy men built. Delving further into contrasting the two through descriptive imagery could bring those differences alive and really grab onto the emotional response of the reader.

As you moved through so many different places, the churches and monasteries blended together. There's some that stood out, like Joel's mega church, or the church with the iPad, but those were the exceptions. I never felt the beauty or complexity of these places that obviously touched you deeply. Were they musty and damp, or heavy with incense? Were they built with stone, brick, or wood? Were they situated deep in a forest, or just off a main road? What did the monks look like, or sound like?

I also think you had an opportunity to spend more time on describing the wicked places. Again, you visited many restaurants, bars, and hotels, but they blended together. Take the libraries for instance. I was a librarian before I practiced law, and I know that libraries are often where the city displays their current architectural, and therefore psycho-social, spaces. For example, libraries built in the 1900s are solemn, made of stone, and are quiet and foreboding. Libraries in the 70s and 80s are inflicted with brutalist architecture, meant to discourage riots and sit ins. Modern libraries are post-modernist monstrosities, made in a disjointed and Jewish style. You can understand a city by its libraries.

I know it was difficult because you visited so many places, but I don't think it's wrong to cut out some of the less remarkable places where not much happened to delve deeper into the ones that did.

With that said, it was one of the few modern books I couldn't put down and enjoyed reading. I think as you continue to get closer to God's grace, your writing will continue to mature, and I look forward to your next book.
Very fair critique. The problem was I was moving so fast that even I didn't notice things on a deeper level. And towards the end, everything started to blend together and my mind had trouble with delineation. The structure of the book was determined by my travel speed, for better and worse.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
Very fair critique. The problem was I was moving so fast that even I didn't notice things on a deeper level. And towards the end, everything started to blend together and my mind had trouble with delineation. The structure of the book was determined by my travel speed, for better and worse.
You have many strengths as a writer. Perhaps it's your scientific and analytical background, but you leave very little meat on the bone. This skill is good for persuasive writing, as it allows you to distil a point or argument from an experience. It's probably why so many men are drawn to you: you extract meaning. You're also a charismatic and confident narrator, which makes the reader want to agree with you and like you. I assume this is from your pick up days, when you had to grab the attention of a woman quickly and convince her to trust you. These skills allows the reader to flow through your book quickly, which gives it pacing like a action novel. It's hard to put your book down. You may not want your reader to rush through all of it. You may want him to linger on certain parts. You may want him to slow down.

For my undergrad, I was an English and creative writing major. Before I learned the humanities and arts were consumed by Marxism, I wanted to be a fiction writer. Of the few good lessons I learned was a story from my fiction professor (who was one of the few Christians left in the faculty). He told me of a story when he was an undergrad.

On the first day of one of his science classes, as the professor was reading out a syllabus, a man ran into the room, jumped over the professor's desk, and stabbed the professor in the chest. The professor screamed and collapsed on the floor. And just as quickly as the man ran into the room, he dashed out of it. The whole class was shocked. As the women began to scream, the professor stood up. When the pandemonium died down at the sight of the resurrected teacher, the professor asked the class: what was the colour of the man's shirt? No-one could say. Was he wearing a hat? Silence. Did he have a mustache? The class looked at him blankly. So the professor said: how can you expect to be scientists when you are unable to observe what happens around you? Science, he said, is about the power of observation. My fiction professor said the lesson is also true of an author. The power of an author is his observation.

The Egyptian, Satanic jewelry on the waitress in Nashville. The woman in the library that, on closer look, was not an angel, but a junkie. The curly pubic hair of the homosexual in Jew York. They say the devil is in the details, but I would also say, the Grace of God's creation is in it's details. You see that with the birds, and perhaps why you are so drawn to the red of the Cardinal.

A gentle suggestion: when you travel and you have your notebook, sketch down some of the sensory cues you receive from memorable experiences. It doesn't have to be too much. A smell here. A sound there. When you revisit those notes for your books, you might find you can draw on them and differentiate the events more clearly.

I think you're a great writer, and I offer all this advice to help, so take what you find useful and discard the rest. I'll be gifting your book to a few male friends and family members in hope they turn to Christ like you have.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
A gentle suggestion: when you travel and you have your notebook, sketch down some of the sensory cues you receive from memorable experiences. It doesn't have to be too much. A smell here. A sound there. When you revisit those notes for your books, you might find you can draw on them and differentiate the events more clearly.
Excellent tip. Thank you for advice. I would like to write a novel sooner than later.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Roosh, I really enjoyed your fiction writing experiments from a few years ago and look forward to more.

I finished the book yesterday and thought it was great. I'd watched all the Babylon Road videos so I knew the general gist of the trip, but there's a lot in this book that didn't make it into the videos: many interesting conversations and interactions with others that really fill things out. I read A Dead Bat in Paraguay for the first time a year or two ago and it's interesting how this book parallels with that one, probably unintentionally. They're both travelogues and a journey of self-discovery, but in drastically different ways. Roosh does a fine job of capturing the decaying infrastructure of contemporary American life, while avoiding despair and black-pill bleakness with plenty of observations of good interspersed with the bad.
 

budoslavic

Owl
Gold Member
Not to hijack this thread, but Gab's Andrew Torba posted a picture of Roosh's American Pilgrim book in his tweet. He is encouraging people to buy Roosh's & Dr. Jones' books because the Cancel Culture mob wants to ban Christian-related books.




For more details regarding the Mother Jones reporter who contacted Torba with questions about "anti-Semitic" messages/posts, see the Gab Thread post.
 
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Roosh

Cardinal
Review on The American Sun:
Roosh has a new book out. It is not Bang Religion or anything to do with pick up. It is an engaging read about his turn away from the old hedonistic life, and his initial attempt to walk a path with Jesus. It is a fun read I recommend.

There are two major narratives in the book. One is a man discovering his faith. This is the obvious one via Roosh’s public posting. The other is a man discovering his home country. Roosh never visited the rest of America, choosing to dive into foreign travel for over a decade. He discovers the cultural bits he had denied himself as well as the natural beauty of this nation that he never bothered to check out.

The religious bits are a little funny at times because he is new to it. He still uses his casual language and is self-deprecating or critical at times. He learns much about faith as he visits more churches. I personally chuckled at the contrasts of church services between parishes across America. No matter the faith, there is no monolithic church.

The national narrative makes this worth a purchase even if you don’t care for the religious transformation. He has always been a great observer of culture, and the state of America is revealed here. The cities are monoculture holes of dysfunction. Regional flavor will be found outside the metros in specific regions. Our library system is really homeless daytime management. The rainbow flag is everywhere so if you don’t have them in your town, you’re winning in life.

There is another thread. Along the trip, Roosh meets or stays with men and shares the talks they had. If you piece the subject matter together, there is a cabal of sorts that seems to operate and control different realms of business and society that uses vices to corrupt anyone seeking advancement. It’s there for you to see if you put it together. I can’t imagine who makes up that cabal.

I was lucky to meet up with Roosh during this trip and just after in DC. Despite the short time between being in the middle of his trip and ending it, he seemed a changed man. He mentions addiction at some point in the book, and he sounded like an addict angry at himself when we met mid-trip. After the trip, he sounded like a man who had processed that anger, recognized it was behind him, and was ready for the next step in life. We’ve met a couple times since, and he is strongly taking those next steps.
 

Mountaineer

Pelican
Gold Member
Received my copy finally. I thoroughly enjoyed the videos so I hope the book will nicely expand that experience. Same number of chapters.
 
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