RIP Neil Peart

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
This sucks.

Peart is one of the greatest drummers of all time. He's right up there with Bonham, Baker, and Moon. He played with such musicality and precision.

And he was always learning. In his 40s he started taking lessons with legendary teacher Freddie Gruber.

Musicians like Peart are one in a million.

 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member

Rush was THE band when I was in high school. A lot of my friends were Peart fanboys, and could air drum all his fills.

Saw them a couple times in concert, including once in their home town Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto.

Edit: he inspired a lot of air drumming:

 

Days of Broken Arrows

Crow
Gold Member
Excellent lyricist. He was extremely well-read and bright and put a lot of complex, challenging ideas into Rush songs.

As a Gen X-er, I lived through the classic rock era. It's my opinion that we had a society that operated on a higher intellectual plane when large groups of people were listening to these types of songs.

Despite only having one U.S. Top 40 hit ("New World Man"), Rush had scads of "Album Rock" hits, and over ten Top Ten albums in America. They also filled massive concert halls for over three decades. It's hard to imagine a group like this having mass popularity today.

I mourn the loss of Neil Peart. But I also mourn the loss of the audience he created.
 

Hypno

Crow
The lyrics in Rush songs were on another level.’

When I was in high school I had honors English and we had to write a poem. One of my friends submitted the (plagiarized) lyrics to Red Barchetta. Got an A+ until the teacher made him read it in front of the class and all the Rush fans busted out laughing.
 

placer

Kingfisher
Neil Peart was a very strong man. He lost his only child, a daughter, in an automobile accident then soon after lost his wife to cancer. This did not stop him; he traveled the Americas in a motorcycle to move beyond that pain, then he started over: He remarried and has a new daughter.

The lesson here is to never give up and never act like life is over or act like the best days are behind us.
 
This is so sad. Neil Peart was probably the greatest drummer in all of rock, and the drummer for one of the greatest bands in all of rock.

Rest In Peace Neil Peart

 

Eusebius

Hummingbird
Gold Member
The only other rock drummers that people compared him to were long deceased. The man was incontestably the greatest living rock drummer for decades. That's on top of his lyrics, and I speak only of his professional accomplishments. He also seems to have been an incredible human being. What a giant.
 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
RawGod said:
The only other rock drummers that people compared him to were long deceased. The man was incontestably the greatest living rock drummer for decades. That's on top of his lyrics, and I speak only of his professional accomplishments. He also seems to have been an incredible human being. What a giant.
Neil was enormously influenced by Phil Collins’ drumming.

Most people have no idea that Phil Collins was a monster drummer before becoming a singer then pop superstar.

 

Thomas More

Hummingbird
placer said:
Neil Peart was a very strong man. He lost his only child, a daughter, in an automobile accident then soon after lost his wife to cancer. This did not stop him; he traveled the Americas in a motorcycle to move beyond that pain, then he started over: He remarried and has a new daughter.

The lesson here is to never give up and never act like life is over or act like the best days are behind us.
:potd:
 

Eusebius

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Dusty said:
RawGod said:
The only other rock drummers that people compared him to were long deceased. The man was incontestably the greatest living rock drummer for decades. That's on top of his lyrics, and I speak only of his professional accomplishments. He also seems to have been an incredible human being. What a giant.
Neil was enormously influenced by Phil Collins’ drumming.

Most people have no idea that Phil Collins was a monster drummer before becoming a singer then pop superstar.

Interesting article. I'm fascinated by the relationships artists have (or don't have) with each other. Like, at any time, I'm pretty sure that Mick Jagger could get Paul McCartney on the phone and reminisce about the 60s. But I bet they don't. In this case, Peart never even met fellow drumming legend Phil Collins properly.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Usually I could hardly care less about famous (or semi-famous) people dying, but this one actually hurts. Very sad. He was a true legend.

Rush is easily my favorite of the classic rock-type bands. Even though I tend to focus more on Geddy Lee's bass and Alex Lifeson's guitar playing, Peart really is the at the heart of the group.

Around Caress of Steel, when they started to jettison a lot of the blues baggage, was when they really took off. They put out a non-stop stream of outstanding albums for a decade, from the mid-70s to mid-80s, all while navigating changes in music trends, music technology, and their own personal growth. That's seriously incredible.

I think my personal favorite is an album that's largely been overlooked (maybe because of the presence of some electronic drums and other very 1980s elements), 1984's Grace Under Pressure. Peart's lyricism might be at its best on this album - especially on the first half. Every song is amazing, though, except for the cheesy Red Lenses.

This record contains my personal favorite Rush song, Between The Wheels. The lyrics are just terrific, and feel as apt today as any time in the 80s. The playing is great, the song is dark and heavy in the verses, with a huge chorus, and it contains my favorite Alex Lifeson solo. Just total perfection all around.


Rush really is one of those bands I think people will still be listening to decades from now, with kids discovering them and getting blown away by their canon of terrific albums and uncompromising musical vision.

The only bad thing I can say about Peart is that in the 2000s he embraced fedora atheism akin to Richard Dawkins. I think he was sometimes prone to Verysmartism, but he's definitely a thoughtful guy, and more often than not it led to some great music.
 

questor70

Ostrich
Days of Broken Arrows said:
Despite only having one U.S. Top 40 hit ("New World Man")
Really? I thought Time Stand Still tracked. It sure got a lot of mainstream airplay. Song is pretty relevant these days.

 

Hypno

Crow
HermeticAlly said:
Usually I could hardly care less about famous (or semi-famous) people dying, but this one actually hurts. Very sad. He was a true legend.

Rush is easily my favorite of the classic rock-type bands. Even though I tend to focus more on Geddy Lee's bass and Alex Lifeson's guitar playing, Peart really is the at the heart of the group.

Around Caress of Steel, when they started to jettison a lot of the blues baggage, was when they really took off. They put out a non-stop stream of outstanding albums for a decade, from the mid-70s to mid-80s, all while navigating changes in music trends, music technology, and their own personal growth. That's seriously incredible.

I think my personal favorite is an album that's largely been overlooked (maybe because of the presence of some electronic drums and other very 1980s elements), 1984's Grace Under Pressure. Peart's lyricism might be at its best on this album - especially on the first half. Every song is amazing, though, except for the cheesy Red Lenses.

This record contains my personal favorite Rush song, Between The Wheels. The lyrics are just terrific, and feel as apt today as any time in the 80s. The playing is great, the song is dark and heavy in the verses, with a huge chorus, and it contains my favorite Alex Lifeson solo. Just total perfection all around.


Rush really is one of those bands I think people will still be listening to decades from now, with kids discovering them and getting blown away by their canon of terrific albums and uncompromising musical vision.

The only bad thing I can say about Peart is that in the 2000s he embraced fedora atheism akin to Richard Dawkins. I think he was sometimes prone to Verysmartism, but he's definitely a thoughtful guy, and more often than not it led to some great music.
Grace under Pressure was my first Rush album and still a favorite. It came out 5 years before the Berlin Wall came down. Listening to it today reminds one of that Cold War hysteria.
 
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