RIP Neil Peart

Hypno

Crow
atkins-van.jpg
 

Parabola

Sparrow
This is very sad to hear, I became a big fan of Rush in my teens, 2112 in particular blew my mind.

Not only one of the greatest drummers in rock and a great lyricist, it seems as if Neil was a man of considerable resilience who bore his burdens and suffering in life in a dignified and private manner.

RIP.
 

Hypno

Crow
Johnny Atkins.

He was a character on the show The Goldbergs.

Huge Rush fan. The show is worth watching just for his classic concert t-shirts
 

Days of Broken Arrows

Crow
Gold Member
questor70 said:
Days of Broken Arrows said:
Despite only having one U.S. Top 40 hit ("New World Man")

Really? I thought Time Stand Still tracked. It sure got a lot of mainstream airplay. Song is pretty relevant these days.


It was a #3 Mainstream Rock hit, but didn't crack the U.S. Top 40.

I should have used Mainstream Rock Tracks as a guide for Rush, not the Top 40, since they never set out to be a singles act. But I have Billboard Hot 100 chart book, so I like to use it. The Rush Wikipedia Discography page is really the best source for this sort of thing these days.
 
The first Rush I ever heard was around 1991 when I was 14 - Fly By Night. It was on my middle school friend's copied cassette (as much of the album as he could fit on one side), which he had obtained from his older brother. On the flip side of the cassette was Moving Pictures. We were blown away with FBN, but just when we didn't think it could get any better, we flipped the tape and Tom Sawyer started up. That was it, I was absolutely hooked. I had never heard anything like it. I remember thinking, "now this is what music should sound like." I wore out a Sony walkman or two just playing Rush. I would save my grass cutting money just to buy a Rush tape every couple of weeks until I had them all. The lyrics to the songs got my attention just as much as the music and really had a profound influence on me from a young teenager into adulthood. The intelligent, yet catchy style and subject matters really got my gears turning and essentially convinced me that being stupid was not an option.

In a word, inspirational.

RIP.
 

Thomas More

Hummingbird
Sargon2112 said:
The first Rush I ever heard was around 1991 when I was 14 - Fly By Night. It was on my middle school friend's copied cassette (as much of the album as he could fit on one side), which he had obtained from his older brother. On the flip side of the cassette was Moving Pictures. We were blown away with FBN, but just when we didn't think it could get any better, we flipped the tape and Tom Sawyer started up. That was it, I was absolutely hooked. I had never heard anything like it. I remember thinking, "now this is what music should sound like." I wore out a Sony walkman or two just playing Rush. I would save my grass cutting money just to buy a Rush tape every couple of weeks until I had them all. The lyrics to the songs got my attention just as much as the music and really had a profound influence on me from a young teenager into adulthood. The intelligent, yet catchy style and subject matters really got my gears turning and essentially convinced me that being stupid was not an option.

In a word, inspirational.

RIP.

I played Exit Stage Left repeatedly in college, then had a cassette of it for years and played it all the time. I eventually lost that tape, and a few years later, I bought another, and played it all the time for several years. It's easily the album I've played the most in my life, not to mention all the times I played other Rush albums.

I would say Alex Lifeson is the one who impressed me the most of the three, but Peart was also amazing. Besides his drumming, I always was very impressed with his lyrics. The lyrics for Closer to the Heart and Limelight have a lot more depth than most Rock lyrics, and they have poetic beauty. Other songs with great lyrics are too many to mention.

RIP
 

SeaFM

Pelican
I’ve been a Rush fan all my life. One of the first albums I ever got was Exit Stage Left.

Three bonafide virtuosos playing music that is so good that I think a lot of people just don’t understand what they’re hearing.

You can always find people that “don’t like Rush” and I think a lot of it is people not getting how great they truly were.

Reminds me of this hyper-intelligent kid I knew in high school that spoke like a mile a minute and listened to the grossest speed metal that you could find. One day I realized that all of that sounded normal speed to him, it was the rest of us that were slow.

That is Rush. On a level that is so much higher musically than most people can get.

Sad news.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
When people say they don't like Rush it's almost always because of Geddy Lee's vocals, or maybe the nerdiness of the lyrics. What's sad is that they'd probably like Rush's 80s music, since both of those tendencies chilled out quite a bit by then.
 
^^^ Good point on Geddy's voice. I've heard that from a lot of people when I would introduce them to some Rush. Never made a difference to me, but I can see how it might be irritating to some people.

If you've ever watched an interview with Neil Peart though, you'll see why their lyrics are so cerebral. The man's mind was on fire. He had to slow himself down just to talk to most of the interviewers, and most of them glazed over after the first few seconds. He was simply on another level than most. A musical and literary prodigy.
 

questor70

Ostrich
They were, let's face it, THE nerd's rock band. Neil's lyrics always used proper grammar (no ain't) and complete disinterest in sexual topics. Probably the height of nerdiness was Natural Science which was basically a textbook recitation of evolution. These are the qualities that simultaneously distinguished the band and limited its mainstream appeal.
 

Zep

Pelican
I borrowed this comment and video from youtube.

A great drummer, a great mind, a great lyricist, a great person. He really was someone so very special. Many will grieve the loss of this awesome man.

At 6:39 Neil is with Geddy and Alex, apparently that was the first time Neil ever stepped out of his kit and went to the front of the stage. F**k, I'm tearing up over here, damn onions, that was the last show of the last tour.



These guys were a huuuggge part of my youth and my development as a guitarist. The first time I played a tune in front of *anyone* was 'Natural Science'. I was very very nervous in front of the seven spectators, but somehow got through it. Later played YYZ in a local rock band. Alex Lifeson played a Sus4 chord so much that bandmates used to say "play the Alex Lifeson chord" when creating a guitar part for an original.

To say there's no Canadian Culture, did someone actually say this? If so, F**k off eh. Neil Peart and Rush will influence and inspire for a long time. "Moving Pictures" is a masterpiece of an album.

Ever see people 'dance' to an instrumental (YYZ) by a Canadian band? Check out that shot at :53 seconds, that is epic. This is in Rio..


Neil Peart lost his daughter and his wife in the space of a year. I can't believe anyone could rebound from that and continue touring. He road a motorcycle from show to show on tour as a way to process the grief I guess.

I love this interview. They're all relaxed and Neil is laughing at Alexs' shenanigans, Geddy is patient as hell, trying to get the guys to start creating again.

RIP Neil.

 

Abelard Lindsey

Woodpecker
questor70 said:
They were, let's face it, THE nerd's rock band. Neil's lyrics always used proper grammar (no ain't) and complete disinterest in sexual topics. Probably the height of nerdiness was Natural Science which was basically a textbook recitation of evolution. These are the qualities that simultaneously distinguished the band and limited its mainstream appeal.

As a long time Rush fan, I would say this is certainly true. Their early music, 2112 through Moving Pictures, had both libertarian and SF themes to it. The theme music became less libertarian and SF and more personal starting in the early 80's. In theory this should have increased their mainstream appeal. I think it is their virtuosity (extreme talent and skill) was simply too much for most people to appreciate. After all, Rush is the definitional prog rock band.

Yes, I'm a hard core libertarian and the fact their music was very libertarian early on was icing on the cake for me. However, I actually like their later music best simply because it was better overall and Geddy's voice had mellowed. Their last studio album, Clockwork Angels, is superb and it so far beyond anything else out there that it isn't even funny.

BTW, I do have nearly every Rush album there is on CD that I have put onto my various MP3 devices (I have three).
 

Days of Broken Arrows

Crow
Gold Member
One thing that's not addressed much is how they were able to pull together and play so precisely after Peart joined. I think this is an influence of his that was overlooked.

Rush wasn't just three virtuosos. It was three virtuosos who could play as if they were one. This isn't easy to do. Not only do you have to be in sync with the other musicians, but you have to put your ego aside for the greater good.

As much as I like Genesis and some other prog groups, none of them played this way. The only comparison I can make is to the vocals of the early Beach Boys, where Brian Wilson would drive them through take after take to get an exacting sound that's mindblowing when you hear it a cappella.

Peart must have played a role like that in Rush. Because they had a much looser on their first album, when they had a different drummer. Instrumentally, they sound like almost any other hard rock act on their debut album.

But when Peart drove the rhythms, there would be segments music so tightly performed they almost sound inhuman. The best example is the transition section that comes up at about 3:33 in "The Spirit Of Radio." It sounds like a drum machine programmed in tandem with a sequencer, but it's a band doing that.

 

SeaFM

Pelican
Their first drummer is also dead.

My grade 7 math teacher told us that Rush used to play at his high school dances and that they were lousy.

I have heard the exact same reasons about Geddy’s voice being the reason that those that don’t like Rush don’t like Rush, but it’s never bothered me. I can’t imagine it any other way. I guess that’s the end of the band. I can’t imagine anyone else drumming for them either.
 

Zep

Pelican
Days of Broken Arrows said:
Rush wasn't just three virtuosos. It was three virtuosos who could play as if they were one. This isn't easy to do. Not only do you have to be in sync with the other musicians, but you have to put your ego aside for the greater good.

As much as I like Genesis and some other prog groups, none of them played this way. The only comparison I can make is to the vocals of the early Beach Boys, where Brian Wilson would drive them through take after take to get an exacting sound that's mindblowing when you hear it a cappella.

Peart must have played a role like that in Rush. Because they had a much looser on their first album, when they had a different drummer. Instrumentally, they sound like almost any other hard rock act on their debut album.

But when Peart drove the rhythms, there would be segments music so tightly performed they almost sound inhuman. The best example is the transition section that comes up at about 3:33 in "The Spirit Of Radio." It sounds like a drum machine programmed in tandem with a sequencer, but it's a band doing that.

"Rush wasn't just three virtuosos. It was three virtuosos who could play as if they were one. This isn't easy to do. Not only do you have to be in sync with the other musicians, but you have to put your ego aside for the greater good."

This is an excellent point, and the Spirit of Radio segment was a great example.

I was in a good band for a while, unfortunately we had one member whose ego was insatiable and he could not calm down his playing for the greater good. This is the usual issue no doubt, but, Rush played together, for one another.
 

SeaFM

Pelican
The bass fills on Time Stand Still are absolutely ridiculous. Almost like hidden gems inside the song.

If anything, I’ve never been a huge Alex Lifeson fan. Just kind of felt like he was always on Mars, so to speak. I always appreciate strong rhythm sections though.
 
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